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^^ilAB.Vt'" 







DR. K; GREY'I^ 

MEMOKIA TECHNICA, 



OR MBTHOD OF 



ARTIFICIAL MEMORY, 



APPLIED TO AND BXBM FLIFDED IN 









ALS0| , : 

JEWISH, GRECIAN AND ROMAN COINS, 
WEIGHTS, MEASURES, &c* 

TO WHICH ARIB 8UBJ0INBD, 

LOWE'S MNEMONICS 

DELINEATED, 

IN VARIOUS BRANCHES OF LITERATURE 

AND SCIENCE. 

A NEW EDITION, CORRECTED. 

OXFORD, 

PRINTED FOR J. VINCENT. 

'BUTAKEIt AND CO.; LONQMAN, BROWN, GRBBN| AND CO.; 
BIBfPKIN AND MARSHALL; AND SHERWOOD, GILBERT, 
AHD PIPBB, LONDON. 

1844. 



3B5 






PREFACE. 



t^ 



>s 



Ir may be proper to acquaint the reader with what im« 
provements have been made in this work since its first 
publication. In the tables of the patriarchs and ancient kings, 
care has been taken to signify, with the utmost brevity, the 
relation which every person bore to his immediate prede- 
cessor. In the geographical part, besides the adding of 
many remarkable places both in ancient and present geo- 
graphy, the memorial lines for the general and particular 
divisions have many of them been formed anew, with par- 
ticular regard to the situation of the respective kingdoms, 
provinces, or countries into which those divisions have been 
"^ made ; so that every line is in some measure the epitome 
rs of a map. The tables of ancient coins, weights, and 
;^ measures have been carefully reviewed, and very much 
augmented ; and decimal tables subjoined, of great use for 
the more speedy and exact reduction of them. There is 
likewise added an Index of the historical, chronological, 
and geographical words; of the usefulness of which is 
given an account in the proper place. Besides these, there 
are several alterations and additions of less moment, inter- 
spersed throughout the whole ; such as either my own ex- 
perience or the judgment of my friends had suggested to 
me, in order to render the design more useful. I shall not 
trouble the reader with the reasons of them, which, if he 
compares the editions, he will very probably find out him- 
self : nor do I think it necessary to apologize for having 
made them, since it could not be expected that an invention 

a2 



426297 



if PREFACE. 

of this kind should be so perfect at first, as not to be capable 
of being considerably improved. And I was the more willing 
to bestow some care and pains upon it, and to give it what 
improvement I was able, in return for the favourable reception 
it has met with from the public, beyond what was expected 
by myself or others. An Art of Memory has by many 
been looked upon as a thing either in itself impracticable, 
or, at least, in the common methods of it, useless and 
trifling. And I was sensible that the following method 
would lie under the additional disadvantage of a whimsical 
and out of the way appearance ; besides that, the seeming 
difliculty of it at first sight would. I foresaw, deter many 
from so much as attempting to make themselves masters 
«f it. Notwithstanding these discouragements, it has ha( 
the good fortune to give some satisfaction, and to meet 
with some success ; and will, I hope, continue to be looked 
upon as an useful help to those who delight in reading, and 
would retain what they had read with £uthfulnes8 and ac- 
curacy, particularly in such points wherein their memories 
are most likely to £eu1 them. 

llie objections which have been made to it from the 
difiiculty of remembering the memorial lines would most 
effectually be removed by habituating young minds to them 
betimes, by the frequent transcribing and repetition of 
them. The technical words would by this means become 
natural and fiEuniliar, and of no small advantage to them in 
the course of their future studies; they would be easily 
received and long retained. But I shall say no more upon 
this point, having already touched upon it in the Introduc- 
tion ; to which also I refer the reader for what might further 
be expected by way of Preface. 



INTRODUCTION. 



It is a general complaint amongst men of reading, and to 
many a discouragement from it, that they find themselves 
not able to retain what they read with any certainty or 
exactness. And in no part of literature is there greater 
room for this complaint than in History : to the studying 
of which with pleasure and improvement, as nothing con- 
tributes more, so nothing has been thought more difficult to 
be retained, than a distinct and accurate knowledge of 
Chronology and Geography, Upon this account several 
attempts have been made to remedy, in some measure, the 
defects of the memory, by chronological and geographical 
tables, cuts, and maps, and by reducing the principal parts 
of history to certain epochas or seras, so disposed and con- 
trived, as may be most likely to affect the imagination, and 
make the deeper impression upon the mind. Thus Mr. 
Hearne, in his Doctor Historicus, has reduced the whole 
tompass of chronology to thirteen grand epochas, all be- 
ginning with the letter C. Dean Prideaux, in his Intro^ 
~3uctiorno History, has made use of the •number seven, 
throughout his whole book ; ** not out of affectation (as he 
tells us) but experience, as most easy for the memory ;'* 
with others of the like nature, which serve at least to show 
that the memory wants assistance, and that small helps are 
better than none. But of all the inventions made use of 
for this end, none has been found to contribute more to the 
%8sistance of the memory than that of technical verses; 
ooth as they generally contain a great deal in a little com- 



▼1 INTRODUCTION. 

pus, and also because being once learned, they are seldom 
or never forgot. For the truth of which I may venture to 
appeal to the weakest memories, whether they have not to 
the last found themselves in possession of that ever-memo- 
rable line, 

Barbara Cdarent Jkaii Fein Baraliptcn, 

Of this nature is the following method ; the design of 
which is, not to make the memory better, but things more 
easy to be remembered ; so that by the help of it, an ordi- 
nary, or even a weak memory, shall be able to retain what 
the strongest and most extraordinary memory could not 
retain without it. For, as he, who first contrived to assist 
the eye with a telescope, did not by that pretend to give 
sight to the blind, or make any alteration in the eye itself, 
but only to bring the objects nearer, that they might be 
viewed more accurately and distinctly; so neither is it 
pretended * by this art to teach those to remember every 
thing who never could remember any thing ; or to make 
men in an instant skilful in sciences which before they 
were utterly unacquainted with ; but only to enable them 
to retain, with certainty and exactness, what they have 
already a general and competent knowledge of : that they 
may not be obliged upon every occasion to have firesh re- 
course to their books or maps, or be under the tiresome 
necessity of reading the same things again and again, still 
forgetting them as feist as they read them. 

To those who may object, of what use is it to be thus 
exact, and content themselves with an imperfect and con- 
fused remembrance of what they read ; it might be answered. 



* Hsee ars tota habet hanc vim, non ut totum aliquid cujas in 
ingeniis nostris pars nulla fit, pariat et procreet ; verum ut ea, 
quee sunt orta jam in nobis et procreata, educat atque confirmet. 
Cicero de Oratore^ lib. ii. edit. C. Steph, p. 182. 



INTRODUCTION. vn 

that such as think it of no use, need not, as I presume they 
^wiD not, trouble themselves about it ; this bdng designed 
for the benefit of those only -who think it is of use ; and 
who, even at the expense of a little pains, would remember 
if they could : but, besides this, I believe it will be agreed 
on all hands, that to instance in history only, a man who 
k4is an exact notion of time and place, finds incomparably 
more pleasure, and makes a speedier progress in that study 
than he who has not 

I shall here beg leave to transcribe a passage firom Addi- 
son's Dialogues, upon the Usefulness of Ancient Medals : 
" There is one advantage, says Eugenius, that seems to me 
" very considerable, which is the great help to memory one 
*' finds in medals : for my own part, I am very much em- 
"' barrassed in the names and ranks of the several Roman 
"' emperors, and find it difficult to recollect upon occasion 
" the different parts of their history: but your medalists, 
*' upon the first naming of an emperor, will immediately 
** tell you his age, family and life. To remember where 
** he enters in the succession, they only consider, in what 
** part of the cabinet he lies ; and by running over in their 
*' thoughts such a particular drawer, will give you aA account 
" of all the remarkable parts of his reign." 

If this be such a considerable advantage in medals, I hope 
it will be allowed that the following method is of some 
use, since by it a man may be enabled to remember when 
any emperor, firom Julius Caesar to Jovian, began his reign, 
and that as readily as you can name him, by the help of m 
more than seven memorial lines. The like he may do, wit{i 
the same ease and readiness, by the kings of England, and 
so proportionably for any other part of sacred or profiine 
history. For, how impracticable soever it may seem at 
first view, I have reason to believe^ that any reader of a 



▼iu INTRODUCnON. 

common capacity may, by a regolar proceeding and ordinal) 
application, be able readily and exactly to aaswer most if 
not all, the questions that can be proposed, from the follow- 
ing tables. 

The manner in which I would advise him to proceed 
(after having premised that he must not be too hasty at 
first, but make himself'*' master of one thing before he pro- 
ceeds to another, beginning with such particulars as he has 
most occasion or inclination to retain) is this. First, let 
him learn to explain the several memorial lines, accordmg 
to the method hereafter to be laid down, by consulting the 
tables to which they belong. 2. This done, let him, by 
.ooking upon the table?, learn to make out the lines ; and 
3, Let him charge his memory with them, hj frequent repe- 
tition. By this means the words will become familiar, 
how harsh and uncouth soever they may appear at first*, 
and he will find it as easy to know the diameter, distance, 
and magnitude of any planet ; tlie particular time or age of 
any remarkable person or thing ; the longitude and latitude 
of any place, and the like, as it is to remember their names : 
the whole art being in effect nothing more than this ; to 
make such a change in the ending of the name of a place^ 
person, planet, coin, &c. without altering the beginning of 
it, as shall readily suggest the thing sought, at the same 
time that the beginning of the word being preserved, shall 
be a leading or prompting syllable to the ending of it so 
changed. 

I would willingly here let the reader a little more 
into my meaning, which he may not otherwise so readily 

* Assumendus usus paulatim, ut pauca primutn complectamur 
animo qos reddi fidelitur possint : mox per incrementa tam mo- 
dica ut onerari se labor ille non sentiat, augenda usu et exercita* 
tione multa continenda est, qus quidem maxima ex parte memoria 
coDStat. i^iwHlianus, lib. x. edit. Gibson. Ox. p. 584. 



INTRODUCTION. 

apprehend, lest he should think there is more difficulty in 
the matter than there really is. I would ask him, then, 
if he thinks he could remember to call Ctbus, Cjruts; 
DanicI, Dauitf// ; ALSxander the Great, Alext7a ; Julius 
Caesar, Juliox Caesar; or MAHOMet, MiiHiQisiaudd, If he 
can but do this, he has nothing else to do (when he is once 
master of the general key, and knows what letters of the 
alphabet stand for what figures) in order to remember, 
without any possibility of being mistaken, that the years in 
which Cyrus, Alexander, and Julius Caesar founded their 
. pective monarchies, were as follow : — 

Before Christ. 

Cyrus — Cyrw/* 536 

ALExander — Al^xt/a 331 

Julius Caesar — Juliof 46 

And that the Mahometan aera, or flight of Mahomet was 
A. D. 622. — In like manner for Geogmphy. Does he think 
he could remember to call MADidd Madroy-^ or JEBUsalem 
Jeru/o./^, or BLENUEim Blenhe6at;, or TnBssaly Thes&janP* 
This is all that is required, — ^to remember that the degree of 
latitude of Madrid is about 40, and the * longitude about 3 ; 
the latitude of Jerusalem about 31, and the longitude 36; 
that Blenheim is in Bavaria, and that what was the ancient 
Thessaly is the present Janna. Thus the reader will ob- 
serve, that all that he has to do, is for one word to remember 
another, which only varies from it a little in the termina'^ 
tion,f And to make even this easier to be remembered. 



* The reader is presumed to be so far aeqaainted with geo- 
^raphy, as to be able to tell which is eastern and which is western 
longitude, when he is informed that the first meridian is fixed at 
London. 

t In many words the variation is very small : as K. John 
R. Jann, iNachns Inakus^ Solon So^tm, HsaoDOtus Herodo/if«« 
pLAto Pla^oAr, TaAJAn TrajafUr, CLSOPATra Cleopatto, GoRdiaa 



X INTRODUCTION. 

the technical words are thrown into the form of com* 
mon Latin verse, or at least of something like it. For as 
there was no necessity to confine myself to any rules of 
quantity or position, I hope I need make no apology for the 
liberty I have taken in having, without regard to either, and 
perhaps now and then without so much as a regard to the 
just number of feet, only placed the words in such order as 
to make them run most easily oiF the tongue, and succeed 
each other in the most natural manner. But this by the 
way for the reader's encouragement. 

In the mean time, till he can repeat the memorial lines, 
and to those who are not willing to give themselves any 
trouble at all in charging their memory with them, the tables 
themselves will not be without their use ; of which it may 
be expected that I should give some accoimt. 

For the chronology and history I have chiefly consulted* 
Archbishop Usher's Annals, Marshall's Chronological Tables^ 
the Ratioruirium Temporum of Petavius, Mr. Hearne's Ductor 
Historicus, and Bishop Beveridge's Institutiones Chronolo^ 
gicas. The succession of the Assyrian and Babylonian 
Monarchs, the Kings of Persia, Media, Sjrria, Egypt, &c.* 
are taken from Dr. Prideaux's Chronological Tables, at the 
end of his Connexion ; the times of the flourishing of the 
Fathers, Heretics, Councils, &c. from Dr. Cave's Historia 
Literaria. The Roman Emperors, and the time of writing 
of the canonical books of the New Testament, from Mr. 
Eachard's Roman and Ecclesiastical Histories. The Legatine 

GordiUf the battle of Marathoii Marathons, AxTila Atti/Ia, 
Croesus Crcesuse, Ausrin Austins, &c. Those which appear more 
difficult will be full as easy, when familiarised by use. 

* It may be some satisfaction to the reader to know, that Mr. 
Bedford (as he tells us in the Preface to his Scripture Chronology) 
never differs from Dr. Prideaux ; and even from the creation of the 
world to the destruction of Jerusalem, never above five years from 
Archbishop Usher, the late Bishop of Worcester, or Mr. Marshalij 



INTRODUCTION. 



zi 



Bnd Frovincial Constitutions from Bbhop Gibson's Codex 
Juris Ecclesiastiei. The astronomical calculations are from 
Dr. Derham's Astro-Theolo^. I have also added Mr. 
Winston's, from his Theory of the Earth. In the geognu 
phical part, my chief guide has been Dr. Wells's Treatise of 
ancient and Present Geography, whose Maps may be con- 
sulted by the learner. For the coins, weights, and mea- 
sures, I have chiefly been obliged to Dr. Arbuthnot's books 
and tables, not without consulting Bishop Cumberland, Dr. 
Bernard, and Bishop Hooper, and other writers upon that 
subject, of whom I have made what use I thought con- 
venient. If any prefer other authors, who differ from these, 
they may easily apply the art to their £eivourite author, by a 
change of the words, according to the method laid down. 
And, indeed, when the reader is perfectly master of it, he 
would do well to form words for his own use, which perhaps 
he will sooner remember than those which I had formed for 
mine ; my design being rather to give a specimen of what 
might be done by it, than a set of complete tables in the 
respective sciences.. If some think I Have been deficient in 
leaving out what they suppose worthy of remembering, others 
perhaps will think I have been too full. To both these I 
answer, that I impose no task upon my readers, nor desire 
to prevent their own improvements: they may add what 
they please, and pass by what they please. Nor do I think 
it at all necessary that they should be able to answer every 
particular in the following tables ; only this I may venture 
to aflSrm, that if they once charge their memory with them, 
they will find them no burden, and that it is not only prac- 
ticable, but easy to be done. 

It is not to be expected that gentiemen, who have gone 
through the course of their studies, will trouble themselves 
to begin again anew, and (n) regularly through the whole ; 



xii INTRODUCmON. 

but it is submitted to tiiose who have the education of young 
students in the universities and public schools, whether it 
would not be of some service towards facilitating the pro- 
gress of their pupils and scholars in useful knowledge, to 
have them early and thoroughly acquainted with this small 
treatise. It is the advice of Quintilian, that boys should be 
used to repeat, as fast as possible, harsh and crabbed words 
and verses, purposely made difficult, in order to give them a 
more full and articulate pronunciation. His words are 
these : * Kon alienum fuerit exigere ah his atatibus, quo 
$U absoluiius os ei expreuior sermo, ut nomina quadam 
verswtqite affeciaias difficultaiis^ ex pluribus asperrime 
coeuntibus inter se syllabis catenatos et veluti confragosos 
quam citatissime volvant. The frequent repetition of the 
following memorial lines would certainly answer this end, 
and at tiie same time a much better ; and if I might also 
recommend, as he does, the vn'iting of them too, in order 
to make the deeper impression, it would doubtless have a 
good effect, and boys would be treasuring up learning even 
before they were aware of it. f iH'^d non panitebit curasse 
cum scribere nomina puer {quemadmodum moris est) caper it, 
ne hanc operam in vocabulis vulgaribus et forte occurrentibus 
perdat, Protinvs enim potest interpretationem Ungues 
secretioris quam Grmci yK^atraQ vocant, dum aliud agitur, 
ediscere, et inter prima elementa consequi rem postea pro- 
prium tempus desideraturam. It may be sufficient to have 
just hinted these things to those whose more' immediate 
province it is, and who are best qualified to judge what 
methods may most effectually contribute to the improvemen 
of those under their care. 

From the account I have given of it, the reader will 

* InstUutionesOrat. edit. Gibson. OzoD. p. 12. t Ibid. 



INTOODUCTION. xui 

observe, that the method here proposed is perfectly different 
from that of Simonides the Cean,* so famous among the 
ancients for being the first inventor of an art of memory, f of 
whom both Tally and Quintilian speak with respect, and of 
whose method of % places and images (t. e. of having a re- 
pository of ideas, a large house, or the- like, divided into 
several apartments, in each of which you are to place in 
order a symbolical representation of the things which you 
would remember) they have given us a very full and par- 
ticular account, as also of the occasion which first gave rise 
to it. What improvements have been made of this method 
by some modem authors, or in what manner or with what 
success others have set up to teach privately the art of 



« SifwvfStrs 6 Awrg4irovs, 6 Kcios, O TO MNHMONIKON EYPHN, 
ivUetfa^if ^Mtfinfffw lUidtrKuv, jcol td ciic<{yes iardBriaciy 'Apiiodlov «ccU 
^Apurroytlroyos, frrj HH.— Marm. Arund. i. 1. 70. 

De Simonide hoc vide Joannem Tsetzem, Chiliade i. cap. 24, 
ttbi victorias reportasse ait quinquaginta sex. CoDsule etiam 
Valerium Maximum, lib. iv. cap. 7. 

t Non sum tanto ego, inquit, ingenio quanto Themistocles fuit 
ut oblivionis artem quam memorie malim; gratiamque habeo 
Simonidi illi Ceio quern primum ferunt artem memoris protulisse. 
Cicero de Oratorey lib. ii. 

X Constat artificiosa memoria locis et imaginibus, &c. Cicero ad 
Herennium^ lib. iii. edit. Car. Steph. p. 80. 

Loca discnnt quam maxime spatiosa, multa varietate signata, 
domnm forte magnam, et in multos diductam recessus. In ea 
quicquid notabile est animo diligenter affigitur, ut sine cunctatione 
ac mora partes ejus omnes cogitatio possit percurrere. 

Tum que scripserant, vel cogitatione complectuntur, et 

alio signo quo moneantur, notant. Quod esse vel ex re tota po- 
test, ut de navigatione, militia : vel ex verbo aliquo. - Nam etiam 
excidentes, unius admonitione verbi in memoriam reponuntur: 
sit autem signum navigationis, ut anchora ; militis, ut aliquid ex 
armis. Hec itaqne digemnt; primum sensum vel locum vesti* 
bulo quasi assignant, secundum atrio, tum impluvia circnmennt, 
nee cabiculis modo aut exedris, sed stratis etiam slmilibusque per 
ordinera committunt. Hoc facto, cum est repetenda memoria, 
inciplunt ab initio loca hsc recensere; et auod cuique crediderunt, 
reposcunt, et eorum imagine admonentur, ic. QuintUiani ItutUu- 
tumes Orat. lib. xi. edit. Gibson, p. 661. 



xiv INTRODUCTION. 

memory, I am altogether ignorant. Having fomid my own 
method sufficient for m3rBelf, I had no inclination to look 
after any other. What use it may be of to the public, must 
be left to experience. The novelty of it may perhaps re* 
commend it to the inquisitive and curious; and I desire 
nothing more than that into whose hands soever it may fall, 
they would not be prejudiced against it upon the account of 
its seeming difficulty, before any have made trial of it; 
being inclined to think, that to any one, who is at all ac- 
quainted with it, it will be found to be so feur from being 
really difficult, that nothing can be more easy, or more 
obvious. The representation of numbers by letters of the 
alphabet hath been a thing in practice, more or less, almost 
in every language. The only thing wanting was to make 
that representation further useful, by substituting vowels, as 
well as consonants, for the numerical figures, in such man- 
ner and proportion, that any munber might be formed into 
a word capable of being articulately pronounced, and con. 
sequentiy more perfectiy remembered. Amongst the Jews, 
indeed, of whose alphabet the vowels are no part, it was a 
practice, not only to abbreviate sentences and names of 
many words, by putting together the initial letters of those 
words, and making out of them an artificial word* to 
express the whole ; but also to make use of natural words, 
to represent numbers, when they could meet with such as 
happened to answer the number they wanted to express. 
We have several pieces of ingenuity of this kind in the 



* As Rambam for R-abbi M-oses B-en M-aimon ; Ralhag for 
R-abbi Li^vi B-en G-«r8on ; Maccabees from the abbreviation of 
the words in the standard of Judas Maceabieus, M-i C-amoka 
B-aeiim J-ehovah, L e. Who is Uke unto thee amongst the godSj O 
Lord I See Prideaux's Connnexion, part. ii. book 8. Of this 
nature is what the reader will meet with in the beginnings of thf 
geographical part of this methofl) p&(|[e 47, ^c 



INTRODUCTION. xv 

frontispieces of their Bibles, "where they give us the year of 
the edition in some word or sentence of Scripture, the letters 
of which, according to their numerical value, make up the 
date. I have subjoined* some of them for the entertain- 
ment of the learned reader, from Bishop Beveridge's Arith' 
meticce Chronologica, And indeed I am not certain whether 
1 owe not to observations of this kind, the first hint of this 
method, which I have carried so far, and which, doubtless, 
.hke all other inventions, is still capable of further improve- 
ments. 

What is added of the miscellany kind, is a small part of 
what I had drawn up for my own use, and shews how easily 
this art may be applied to almost every part of learning. If 



* Sed non omittendum est, Judsos in librorum prscipuetitulis, 
ad annum quo impressi sunt indigitandum, literas numerales alio 
atque quern tradidimus ordine collocare. Enimvero vocem unam 
vel plures, easque vol seorsim, vel in sententia aliqua Biblica 
comprehensas excogitant. quarum liters utut disposits numerum 
propositum valeant. Ex. gr. In Bibliis Sacris a Josepho Atbia 
Amstelodami editis, tria occurrunt frontispicia, unum ad Penta- 
teuchum, ad Propbetas alterum, tertium ad Hagiograpba. Primum 
impressum diciiur pfiS nsno l&D tOf ^ivh T\i^ Anno computi 
minoris lingua mea est. stylus sertbee prompti. Ps. xlv. Ubi 
voces *1&D is]f ut Tirgulis superne notatfe annum indigitant quo 
Pentateuchus impressus fuit. Quotus autem fuit annus computi 
Judaici minoris statim inveniatur, si omnes vocum instarum liters 
una cum numerico earum galore ita disponantur, y 70 B 9 D 60 
DSO n 200.=419. Ergo annus erat 4l9juxta computum Juds- 
orum minorem, de quo Tideris cbronolpgicas nostras institutiones. 
Sic et propbetffi impressi dicuntur pfiSj^n ^i KVD D^va. Anno 
Onus vallis visionis computi minoris. Is. xxii. Ubi litene kvd 
|*Tn O vatent 420. Frontispicium autem ad Q^aina sive Hagio- 
grapba impressum es^ anno D*nS)l ya^KS D*a>nd scripta digito 
Dei, ubi priroflc dus Ulerae Tocis D^SirS annum eundem 420 signi- 
ficant. Nam t\ valet 400, et 3 30. Hiinc etiam in modum Talmud 
Basilen impressum dicitur vsyh rhv niifi r\W Anno redemptionem 
misU populo suo, Ps. cxi. Ubi literae Tocis iSv valent 88S. 
Denique Seder Tepbillotb Hispaniensis, sive Judsorum His- 
panonim liturgia ingeniosissime impressa, dicitur HMTH TWO Hoc 
Anno, i. e. Anno 413, quem litene rMTH indigitant. Lib. i. c. 6« 
p. 211, 812.4to. 1669. 



xvi INTRODUCTION 

upon the whole this attempt shall be found to contribute to 
the more speedy attainment of useful knowledge, and to 
give men of reading, instead of an imperfect and confused 
remembrance of what they read, a satis&ctory certainty 
and exactness, as I cannot think the little time I have spent 
upon it ill bestowed in respect of my own improvement, so 
I shall be glad that it proves of as much benefit to others as 
] have found it to myself. 



ReeonuttetuhtortftAaraeter of GREY'S MEMORIA TECHNICA, «rt«M 
by the Rev. Mr. Lawson, same years Head Master qf a FoundaiioH 
Grammar School^ at Wolverhampton ; given in the prrface (f a work 
pubiished by Mm for the ute qfhitpupUe. 

The probable reasons why Grey's Mbmoria Tbchhica has not 
been more generally received in Orammar Schools, where any sepa- 
rate regard is paid to History and Chronology, are^ that it abounds 
with matter which has not a strict relation to classical authors, and 
that it is extended to branches of knowledge, such as Geography, 
Astronomy, &c. where the necessity of the art is not so oTident, 
and the diiBculty of application much greater. 

In defence of this art as a subsidiary aid to young persons in 
History and Chronology, I will not say, that by the help of it the 
weakest memory may be able to retain what the strongest could 
not retain without it ; but I have no scruple in recommending it 
to those who wish to avoid the necessity of perpetual recurrenc<i 
to chronological maps or tables, and who prefer accuracy and fidelity 
to confused recollection and imperfect remembrance. It does not, 
indeed confer a new faculty, but it teaches us to manage with skill 
the capacity of the memory, and contrives such helps as greatly 
assist its natural powers* 



CONTENTS. 



GREY'S MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

SECTION I. 
A General View of the principai Part qfikii Method. 

SECTION II. 

The ApplicaUon cftlut Art to Chronology and History, 

I. General Epochas and iBras, Ecclesiastical and CiTil. 7 

II. Some of the more eminent Epochas 8 

III. Chronological and Historical Miscellanies before Christ 9 

IV. Chronological and Historical Miscellanies after Christ 10 
V. The Regal Table of England since the Conquest, and 

some of the most remarkable Princes before it 19 

VI. Chronological Miscellanies since the Conquest 14 

VII. The Patriarchs before and after the Flood 16 

VIII. The Patriarchs, &c. according to their Years before 

Christ 17 

IX. The Judges of Israel, from the death of Moses to Samuel 18 

X. The Kings of Israel and Jadah 19 

XI. The Prophets 20 

XII. The Kings of Assyria and Babylon after the Dissolu- 
tion of the ancient Assyrian Empire upon the Death 

of Sardanapalus 21 

XIII. Kings of Egypt, Media, and Persia 23 

XIV. The different Names of the same Persons in Scripture 

and in Profane Authors 25 

XV. Kings of Egypt and Syria, after the Death of Alex 

ander the Great 26 

XVI. Jewish High Priests, &c. after the Return from the 

Captivity 28 

XVII. Founders, &c. of ancient Monarchies 29 



XX CONTENTS. 

XVni. Grecian History 90 

XIX. Grecian Lawgivers, Philosophers, and Poets 92 

XX. Roman History 83 

XXI. The Consular State to Julius Csesar ib, 

XXII. The Twelve Cesars 34 

XXIII. The Roman Emperors from Nerva to Jovian 3d 

XXIV. The Division of the Empire 37 

XXV. Eastern and Western General Councils 39 

XXVI. Fathers, Heretics, &c 40 

XXVII. Popes, Authors, famous Men, &c 42 

XXVIII. The Founders of the States of Europe 44 

XXiX; The Times of the writing of the Canonical Books 

of the New Testament 45 

XXX* The Provincial and Legatine Constitutions, accord- 
ing to the order in which they were made 4# 

SECTION III. 

The Application of this Art to Geography, 

I. The general Divisions of Europe, Asia, Africa, and 

America , 49 

II. The particular Divisions of Northern Europe .... 50 

HI. The particular Divisions*of Middle Europe 51 

IV. The particular Divisions of Southern Europe 53 

V. England, Wales, Ireland, and Scotland 54 

VI. Chief Cities and remarkable Places in France, Ne- 
therlands, Germany, Spain, and Turkey 67 

VII. Remarkable Places (spartim) in Europe 58 

VIII. Chief Cities and remarkable Places (sparsim) in 

Asia, Africa, and America 60 

IX. Latitudeand Longitude of the most remarkable Places 61 
X. Distance of chief Cities, &c. from London, in English 

Miles 64 

XI. The Proportions of the Kingdoms of Europe to 

Great Britain, that Island being the Unit 65 

XII. Situation of the European, Asiatic, African, and 

American Islands 66 

XIII. The most remarkable of the lesser British Islands.. 69 

XIV. Ancient Euroi>e, Asia, and Africa 70 

XV. Ancient Italy and Greece, Asia Minor, Syria, and 

Palestine 71 

XVI. Ancient Gallia, Germania, Iberia, Britannia 74 

XVII. Remarkable Places in ancient Geography 76 

XVIII. The correspondence ofancient and present Geography 78 
XIX. Ancient and present Seas, Straits, Gulfs, Islands, 

Rivers, Towns 79 

XX. Geographia Sacra. The Plantation of the Earth 

after the Flood 82 

XXI. Division of the HolyLandintheOldandNewTestament 8^ 
XXII. The most remarkable Rivers, with the Places where 

th^7 rise, and the Seas into which they fall. .. . 85 



CONTENTS* XXi 

SECTION IV. 
Tht Apflieatum of this Art to Astronomy and Ckronoiogy. 

I. The Diameters, frc. of the Planets in English Miles, 

according to Dr. Derham's Astro- theology 87 

The Magnitudes or solid Contents in Cubic Miles of the 
larger Planets 88 

The Ambit or Circumference of Jupiter, &c » ». . . ib. 

II. The Diameters, &c. of the Planets, according to Mr. 

Whiston, and their Distances from the Sun 89 

The Proportion of the Quantity of Matter in the heaTenly 
Bodies, the Weight of Bodies on their Surface^ and 
their Densities 90 

III. The periodical Times of the Revolutions of the Planets 91 
The Distances of the Planets from the Sun in decimal 

parts J5. 

The Motion of the Sun, Jupiter, and the Earth round 

their Axes 92 

The three Comets, whose Periods were thought to have 

been discovered ib. 

IV. Chronological Notes concerning the Lunar and Solar 

Month and Year ; the Metonic, Calippic, Dionysian, 

and Julian Periods, &c 93 

To find the Year of the Julian Period, the Years of the 
other Cycles being given 94 

SECTION V. 
The Application of this Art to Coins, Weights, and Meatares, 

I. Hebrew, Attic, Babylonish, Alexandrian, and Roman 

Money 98 

LL Measures of Length, ftc 100 

English and Grecian Measures of Length t5. 

Roman and Jewish Measures of Length 102 

III. The Proportion of the foregoing Measures to English 

Measures 104 

IV. Superficial Measures, &c 105 

V. Measures of Capacity 106 

English Wine Measure jb, 

English Com Measure 107 

Grecian Measures of Capacity jb. 

Roman Measures of Capacity 108 

Jewish Measures of Capacity 109 

VI. Measures of Capacity reduced to English Afeasures . . 1 10 

VII. Weights 112 

Roman and Grecian lesser Weights I L8 

VIII. Ancient Weights reduced to English Troy Weights... 116 
IX. Jewish and Roman Money, according to Bishop Cum 

berland 1 16 

Decimal Tables for the more easy Reduction of ancient 
Coins, Weights, and Measures Ill 



XXU CONTENTS. 

SECTION V, 

iiUoeUanea, 

The Proportion of the Diameter to the Cireumference of a 

Circle, the Area of a Circle, &c lio 

The Area of an Ellipsis, the Surface and Solidity of a Sphere 126 

The quantity of Vapours raised out of the Sea ib. 

The quantity of Water the Mediterranean receives from the 

Riyers that fall into it 127 

The Velocity of Sound, Light, &c 128 

The Jewish Months 129 

The Grecian Months id. 

The Jewish and Christian ^ra of the Creation ISO 

The Days of the Month on which the other noted Epochas 

began ib. 

The specific Gravities of some Metals and other Bodies 131 

Numerus Dignitatum, &c. tempore Camdeni 182 

The Temple of the Winds ib. 

Roman Militia 133 

Roman Law , ib. 

The Bishops who refused their Assent to the *Ofioo6o'u>y 134 

The ten Persecutions ib. 

The Electors of Germany. ib. 

The Qttinquarticular Controyersy 135 

The seven Precepts of the Sons of Noah ib. 

The Misnah, Gemarah, and Talmud 136 

Characteres Arithmetici Oneci et Hebraici. ib. 

The Ages of Christianity, according to what was most remark- 
able in each Century 187 

The Division of the Roman Empire into Prsfectures and 

Dioceses ib. 

The Dimensions of the Ark and Temple 138 

Computation of the Cost, Vessels, Vestments, Ac. of Solomon's 

Temple , ib. 

The number of those who returned from the Captivity 139 

The difference of Talents 140 

A Specimen how this Art may be made use of to remember 
particular Statutes •••• • ... ib» 



CONTENTS. 



XXIU 



LOWE'S MNEMONICS DELINEATED. 



Annuiths 176 

Arithmetic 148 

Arks 176 

As, Roman 144 

Astronomy 167 

Atmosphere 177 

Bible 178 

Chronology 162 

Coins 144 

Cycle 160 

DiTisibility 177 

Dominical Letter 160 

Ductility 178 

EasterTable 166 

England .173, 174 

Epochas 168 

ETaporation 178 

Festivals 165 

Geography 167 

History 178 

Land., 168 



Man 179 

Measures 147 

Memorial Verses 181 

Meridians 173 

Monarchies 175 

Money 144 

Months 157 

Moon 158 

Multiplication 150 

Numerical Letters ib. 

Practice 151 

RiTers 180 

RttleofThree )53 

Subtraction 154 

Sun 160 

Tabulating 154 

Testament 174 

War 176 

Water 171 

Weights 156 

Zodiac 150 



Affbxdix 187. 



MEMORIA TECHNICA. 



SECTION L 

The principal part of this metbod is briefly this: to 
remember any thing in history, chronology, geography, 
&c. a word b formed, the beginning whereof being the 
first syllable or syllables of the thing sought, does, by 
frequent repetition, of course draw after it the latter part, 
which is so contrived as to give the answer. Thus, in 
history, the Deluge happened in the year before Christ 
two thousand three hundred and forty-eight; this is sig- 
nified by the word Deletok: Del standing for DELuge, 
and etok for 2348. In astronomy, the diameter of the 
sun (Soiis Diameter) is eight hundred and twenty-two 
thousand one hundred and forty-eight English miles; this 
is signified by Sol-Siked-dfei : Sol-di standing for the 
diameter of the sun, ked-dfei for 822,148; and so of the 
rest, as will be shown more fully in their proper place. 
How these words come to signify these things, or con- 
tribute to the rememb^ing them, is now to be shown. 

The first thing to be done is to learn exactly the fol- 
lowing series of vowels and consonants, which are to 
represent the numerical figures, so as to be able, at plea- 
sure, to form a teehmcal word, which shall stand for any 
number, or to resolve a word already formed into the 
number which it stands for : 



a 


e 


I 





« au 


Ot 


ei 


ou 


y 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 





b 


d 


t 


/ 


B 


P 


k 


n 


z 



2 MEMORIA TBCHNIGA. 

Here a and b stand for 1, e and d for 2, i and t for S, 
and so on. 

See also other signs at page 4. 

These letters are assigned arbitrarily to the respective 
figures, and may very easily be remembered. The first 
five vowels in order naturally represent 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. The 
diphthong au, being composed of a 1 and u 5, stands for 
6; at for 7, being composed of o 4 and t 3; ott for 9, 
being composed of o 4 and u 5. The diphthong ei will 
easily be remembered for etght, being the initiab of the 
word. In like manner for the consonants, where the 
initials could conveniently be retained, they are made use 
of to signify the number; as t for ihree, /for ^bur, s for 
fix, and n for nine. The rest were assigned without any 
particular reason, unless that possibly p may be more 
easily remembered for 7 or se/item, /r for 8 or o&rit, d for 
2 or daOy b for 1, as being the first consonant, and I for 5, 
being the Roman letter for 50^ than any others that could 
have been put in their places. 

The reasons here given, as trifling as they are, may 
contribute to make the series more readily remembered ; 
and if there was no reason at all assigned, I believe it 
will be granted that the representation of nine or ten 
numerical figures by so many letters ai the al|4iabet, can 
be no great burthen to the memory. 

The series, therefore, being perfectly learned, let the 
reader proceed to exercise himself in the formation and 
resolution of words in this manner : 

10 325 381 1921 1491 1012 536 7967 
az tel teib aneb afna bybe uts pousoi 

431 553 680 &e. 

Jib hit seiz &c. 

And as, in numeration of larger soms, it is usoal to 
point the figures at their proper periods of thousands, 
millions, billions, &c. for the more easy reading of them, 
as 172,102,795, one hundred and seventy-two millions 
one hundred and two thousand seven hundred and ninety- 
five; so, in forming a word for a number consisting of 



CHR0N0L061CA BT H18T0RICA. O 

many figures, the syllables may be so conyeniently di- 
vided, as exactly to answer the end ot* pointing. Thus, 
in the instance before us» which is the diameter of the 
orbit of the earth in English miles, the technical word 
is D-orb'Thboid'dze'paul ; the beginning of the word, 
D-orb-T^r, standing for the diameter of the orbit of the 
earth (D-iameter ORBitae TERrse), and the remaining 
part of it, boid-dze-poul, for the number 172,102,795. 

N. 3. Always remember that the diphthongs are to be 
considered but as one letter, or rather, as representing 
only one ^ure. Note also, that y is to be pronounced 
as w, for the more easily distinguishing it from t, as 
sydras6Q2, pronounce inoid, typ=:201, pronounce twip. 

The reader will observe, that the same date or number 
may be signified by different words, according as vowels 
or consonants are made choice of, to represent the figures 
or to begin the words with, as, 

325 tel, or idu, 154 buf, or bh, or aif, or ah, 93,451 
ni'ola, or <mt-fub, or ni-Jla, or out-olb, &c. 

This variety gives great room for choice, in the for- 
mation of words, of such terminations as by their tencom- 
monness are most likely to be remembered, or by any 
Qcddentai relation or allunen they may have to the thing 
sought Thus the year of the world in which ^'neas is 
supposed to have settled in Italy is 2824; but as this 
may be expressed either by ekef or deido, I choose rather 
to join deido to JEneas, and make the technical word 
Mnedeido than Mnekef, for a reason which I think is 
obvious. Thus King John began bis reign A. D. 199 
(one thousand being understood to be added, as I shall 
show hereafter) ; but as this may be expressed by anout 
or boun, or ann, I make choice of the last, for then it is 
but calling him Jann instead of John, and you have the 
time almost in his name. Thus Inachus King of Argos 
began his reign in the year before Christ 1856 ; with a 
small yariation in the spelling, it is his name InaArtM. 
More instances of this kind see in page ix. of the In- 
troduction. 

b2 



4 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

To go on with our art: it is further to be observea 
that z and y being made use of to represent the cipher, 
where many ciphers meet together, as in 1000, 1000000, 
i&c. instead of a repetition of azyzyzy, which could neither 
be easily pronounced nor remembered, g stands for hun- 
dred, th for thousand and m for million. Thus ag will be 
100, ig 300, oug 900, &c.; ath 1000, oth 4000, otho or 
oM/4004, peg 7200, dig 2300, lath 51000, am 1000000, 
azmoth 10,004,000, sumvis 65,000,056, Umm 59,000,000, 
&c. The solid content of the earth (TERrae M AONlTudo) 
is two hundred and sixty-four thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-six millions of cubic miles; this is expressed by the 
word Ter-magnite^o-A/aum; Ter-magnit standing for 
Terrae Magnitude; iso-klaum for 264,856,000,000, the 
number of cubic miles. 

It will be sometimes also of use to be able to set down 
a fraction, which may be done in the following manner: 
let r be the separatrix between the numerator and the 
denominator, the first coming before, the other after it ; 
as iro 4-; urp f ; pourag -^^^ or *79; north -M-u- or *094, 
&c. Where the numerator is 1, or unit, it need not be 
expressed, but begin the fraction with r, as 4. re, 4- ri, 
^ ro, &c. So in decimals, *01 or -rhr, rag; *001 or Tirmrf 
rath. 

Thus I have given the reader a general view of the 
principal part of this method, and now proceed to show 
how I have applied it to history, geography, astronomy, 
and other parts of useful learning; and, having explained 
a line or two in each, leave the rest to his own industry 
and sagacity; and though the geographical parts are not, 
in this edition, completely modernized, according to the 
present divbions of the earth, neither are the recent dis- 
coveries in astronomy noticed here ; yet it is hoped that 
sufficient is done to answer the student's purpose. 



CHRONOLOGICA ET HISTORIGA. 



SECTION II. 

THE APPLICATION OF THIS ART TO CHRONOLOGY ^ 

AND HISTORY. 

The ages of the world before our Saviour's time are, by 
chronologers, generally divided into six: the first, from 
the creation to the deluge; the second, from the deluge 
to the call of Abraham, &c. according to the following 
periods: 

Bef. Christ. 

1. The CReation of the world 4004 

2. The universal DfiLuge 234B 

3. The call of ABraham 1921 

4. Exodus, or the departure of the Israelites from 

Egypt 1491 

5. The foundation of Solomon's TEMple .... 1012 

6. Cyrus, or the end of the captivity .... 536 

The birth of Christ. 

All this is expressed in one line belonging to Table I., 
as follows: 

Crothff Diletok, Ahaneb, "Exdfna, Timbybe, Cyruts. 

Gr denotes the Creation, othf 4004, Del the Deluge, 
Ab the calling of Abraham, Ex Exodus, Tern the Temple, 
and Cyr Cyrus. The technical endings of each represent 
the respective year, according to the rules already laid 
down. 

I shall explain two lines more. 

Nic-Sil-Con-Ari^c/, Co.Da-Th6-Ma*«6, Eph-Ce-The- 

l^esfib, 
Ch^l-Le-Mar-Eudiofo, Co-Vi-JAst-O/ti^ C-Ag-Co-Po- 

Monm«. 



6 MBMORIA TBCHNIGA. 

These two lines are a short history of the first six 
General Councils ; and every syllable has its distinct 
signification. The Jirst represents the place where it 
was held ; the second shows who was pope at that time ; 
the third under what emperor; X^lb fourth against what 
heretic ; the fifth in what yiear of our Lord. Thus the 
first word is Nic-Sil-Con-Ari*e/; Nic denotes the coun- 
cil of Nice, Sil pope SiLvester, Con the emperor CoN- 
stantine, Ari the heretic Arius, tel the year 325. The 
second word is Co-Da-Th^-Ma/ee^; Co denotes the 
council of Constantinople, Da pope DAmasus, Th^ the 
emperor THEodosius, Ma the MAcedonians, teib 381. 
The third is Eph-Ce-The-N6s/?6; Eph the council of 
EpHesus, Ce pope Cslestine, The the emperor THEodo- 
sius, junior, Nes the NEStorians, fib the year 431. The 
fourth is Ch^l-Le-Mar-Eudio2a ; Ch41 the council of 
CHALcedon, Le pope Leo, Mar the emperor MARcian, 
Eudi the errors of EiJtyches and Diosoorus, ola the year 
451. The fifth is Co-Vi-Jfist-0/M<; Co stands for Con- 
stantinople, Vi pope Vigilius, Jiist the emperor Jus- 
Tinian, O the errors of 0-rigen, hit the year 553. The 
sixth is C-Ag-Co-Po-Monseia; C stands again for C-on- 
stantinople, Ag for pope Aoatho, Co-Po the emperor 
Constantine Pogonatus» Mon the MoMothelites, sdz the 
year 680. 

By this specimen the reader will be able to judge what 
he is to expect from the following Essay, and what it will 
cost him to make himself master of it. I would by no 
means have him discouraged at the difficulty which, at 
first view, he may apprehend there is, in charging his 
memory with so many harsh and barbarous lines ; for 
though they may appear to be so to a person unacquainted 
with them, and^ as such, difficult to be remembered, yet 
when frequent repetition has made them familiar, what 
can be more easy than to supply the remaining part of a 
word which you are prompted with the beginning of? as, 
for instance, to complete Cr — Del — Ab — Ex — Tern — 
Cyr — with their technical endings, and make them up 
into the following line, already explained : 

Crothf, Dkletok, Ahaneb, lS.xdfna, Tembybe, Cyruts. 



CHRONOIiOQIOii £T HISTORICA. 7 

I have only further to desire the reader to take notice, 
that, for his greater ease, that part of the memorial words 
which represents the numbers or dates, is distinguished by 
UaHc characters; that part which is roman answers to the 
small capitals in the Tables. 



TABLE I. 

eSKERAL EPOCHAS AND JERA8, ECCLESIASTICAL AND CIVIL. 

Bef. Christ. 

The CReation of the world — Crothf 4004 

The universal DELuge — Deietok 2348 

The call of ABraham — Abaneb 1921 

Exodus of the Israelites — T^x&fna 1491 

The foundation of Solomon's TEMple — Tembybe . 1012 
Cyrus, or the end of the captivity — Cyruts . . 536 
The birth of Christ 

The destruction of Troy — TrOy abeit 1J83 

The first OLYMpiad — Olympoi* 776 

The building of RoMe — RompHf 753 

^Ra of NABONASsar — ^r-N^abond^op . . . 747 
The PuiLippic aera, or the death of Alexander — 

Phiiufo 324 

The aera of Co NT r Acts, or of the Seleucidae, called 
in the book of Maccabees the aera of the kingdom 

of the Greeks — Contractor/ 312 

Anno Domini. 

The DiocLEsian aera, or the sera of Martyrs — 
Diocleseko 284 

The aera of the Hegira, or flight of MAHOMet— 
MQkomaudd • • • . . 622 

The aera of YEZdegird, or the Persian aera — Yezsid 632 

The Memorial Lines, 

CrofA/", D^letok, Ahaneb, Ez4/na, Tembybe^ CyrtUs. 
Trdyabeit, OlympoM, Rompu^ & .^-Nabon^uspop. 
Philic2o, Contt^ctad, — Diocl^seAo, Mkhomaudd, Y^zsid. 



8 MEMORIA TBGHNICA. 

Though I have no where (except in the ages of» the 
patriarchs before Abraham) made use of any other sera 
than that of the years before and after Christ, because 
those being known, it is easy to find the correspondent 
year of any other aera, according to the common rules 
laid down in books of chronology, which I shall suppose 
the reader to be acquainted with; yet, in the more emi- 
nent epochas, that he may be able, at first glance, to have 
a notion of the time of any thing or person which he may 
meet with in authors making use of the Julian period and 
\he sera of the creation of the world, I have also added 
iiem in the following Table. 



TABLE 11. 

Jul. Period. An. Mun. 

The CREation of the world c-710 — 1 

The universal DfiLuge ...... 2366 — 1656 

The call of Asraham • . . 2793 — 2083 

Exodus of the Israelites 3223 — 2513 

The foundation of Solomon's TsMple . 3702 — 2992 
Cyrus, or the end of the captivity . . 4178 — 3468 

The destruction of Troy 3531 — 2821 

The first OLYMpiad 3938 — 3228 

The building of RoMe 3961 — 3251 

The birth of CHRlSt 4714 — 4004 

The Memorial Lines. 

Creppas, DeX^StsaUf D6masie«, Ahmexki, Abp^/mt, 
Exptiie^, IBxm^lat, Tempipze, Temm^itn€, CymCin^of^, 
Cyrpo^iA:, Troypl/ta, Tr6meAe6, Olympinik, Olmtiek, 
Romptfua, R6mtd«6, ChrismiindofAf, Chrisperi/bi6o. 

EXPLANATION. 

The first syllable points out the epocha as before ; the 
addition of p or peri denotes that it is the year of tho 
Julian period; the addition of m or mund, that it b tho 
year of the world. 



CHRONOLOOJCA BT HISTORICA. 



TABLE III. 

CHAONOLOaiCAL AND HISTORICAL MISCELLANIES BEFORE 

CHRIST. 

Bef. Christ. 

Building of the tower of B ABel— Bibedt^ . . . 2233 

Mizraim settles in £^pt — Mizdakk 2188 

Destruction of SoDom and Gomorrah — S6dakoup . 1897 

Death of Joseph — Jos^phanl 1635 

Anuus S-abbaticus, or the first Sabbatical year — 

AnSfljOgr 1444 

Saul first King of Israel — Saul^^rnu 1095 

JERoboam, or the defection of the ten tribes — 

J^ronoi/ 975 

SALManeser King of Assyria takes Samaria, and 

extinguishes the kingdom of Israel — Salm/ie^ . 721 
Ho LOF£rnes invadeth Judaea, and is slain by 

Judith— Holofes/tt . 655 

NlN£veh destroyed by the Medes and Babylonians 

— Nin^YMtd 612 

JfiHOiAkim taken prisoner by Nebuchadnezzar, 
from whence began the 70 years captivity of the 

Jews — Jeh6ia«y« . 600 

ZBDekiah sent in chains to Babylon, and Jerusalem 
utterly destroyed by Nebuzaradan, captain of the 
guard to Nebuchadnezzar; the end of the king- 
dom of Judah — Zedieik 588 

[N.B. The kingdom of IsRael— Isre/o > . „, , ( 254 ) ^ 

Tb© kingdom of JuDah-^udw* / ^*'^^ ^ 468 / ^^""'^'^ 

The BABylonians having revolted from DARius 
HTstaspes, are beseiged by him, and Babylon 
taken, after a siege of 20 months, by the strata- 
gem of Zopyrus — Bab-D^-Hy^ ..... 516 

SARDis burnt by the Athenians, in confederacy 
with the lonians, which gave the first rise to the 
Peruan war against the Greeks — Sardu^. . . 500 

B 3 



10 MEMORIA TCCHNICA. 

Bef. Clirist. 

ZoRO Astres appears at the Persian court — Zoroa/ne 492 

Est Her made concubine to Ahasuerus — £sthoj»*a . 461 
The feast of PuRim instituted in memory of the 

defeat of Haman's plot for the destruction of the 

Jews— Puro/* 453 

EzRa sent to be governor of Judaea — Ezrolk . . 458 
NEHEMiah sent governor to Judaea, rebuilds the 

walls of Jerusalem — Nehemi^u 445 

The temple on Mount GERizim began to be built 

by Manasseh — Gevizbtei 408 

The translation of the SEPTuagint— SeptejToi . . 277 

Judas M-accabasus — Ju-Mass 166 

The Memorial Lines, 

Bihedit & Mizdakk, S6dakonp, Jos6phast7, AnSafff, 
Swxldznu, J^ronot*/, Salmpeft, Holofes/u, Niniysad, 
Jehola^«, ZedUdk, [duravit Isrelo, Jndosk], 
Bab-Dar- Hyto, Sardu^, ZoTQafne, EsthoMt, Puro/f» 
JS,zrolk, Nehemij^, Gerizbzei, Sept^oi, Ju-Mtiss. 



TABLE IV. 

CHROKOLOOICAL AND HISTORICAL MISCELLANIES APTER 

CHRIST. 

Addo Domini. 

Dispersio JuDaeorum, or the destruction of Jeru- 
salem by Titus — Dis-Judpa 71 

Lucius of Britain, the first Christian king — ^Ldci^up 157 
ZENOBia, Queen of Palmyra, led in triumph to 

Rome by Aurelian — Zenohdoid 272 

EccLESias Pax, or the establishment of Christi- 
anity by Constantine — Ecclesi-Pax/acf , • . 312 
St. Alban the British Protomartyr — Alhantyt . d03 
CLOvis the first Christian King of France — C16yo^a 481 
LiNGua LATina, or the Latin tongue ceases to be 
commonly spoken in Italy— Ling-Latfetp • . 587 



GHRONOLOGIGA BT HISTORICA. 11 

Anno Domini. 

AuGustine the monk, sent by Gregory the Great 
from Rome, converts ETHELbert King of Kent 

— Aug-£thelif]iau 596 

CHARLeMagne declared Emperor of the West — 

Charlme^ 800 

The CROisade, or Holy War — Crois^tte . , , 1095 
HTBernia, or the conquest of Ireland — Uyba^'d . 1172 
OTToman the founder of the prseiealt Turkish empire 

—Ottadoup 1297 

The Mariner's CoMPass found out — Compa/26 . 1302 
The PAPal seat removed to Avignon — Pap-Ava^y/ 1305 
Walter LoLlard, with many of his followers, burnt 
in Austria, for opposing the Rombh superstitions 

—Lolaiub 1351 

6 UN Powder invented in Germany by a monk — 

Gunpi(/b 1344 

TAMerlane the Tartar overcomes BAJazet the Turk, 
and pnts him in au iron cage. (The Great MoGul 
is descended from him.) — ^I'am-Baja^^un (Mog) • 1399 
ScANDERberg, Prince of Epirus, famous for his 

victories over the Turks — Scander6o/2 .... 1443 
The invention of PRiNting — Prina/bn .... 1449 
CoNSTANTiNople taken by the Turks, and an end 

put to that empire — Constantino6^/t .... 1453 
Christopher Co LU Mbus, a native of Genoa, discovers 
Cuba and Hispaniola — Columbont 1493 

N. B, The southern continent of America was discovered 
about four years after by Americus Vespusius, from 
whom it took its name. 

The Memorial Lines, 

Dis-Jud/Mi, L6ci6tej}, Zenob(/ot(£, £cc1esi-Paxfa<f, 
Albanfyt, C16vo^a, Ling-Lat/etp, Aug-Etheli^nau, 
Charlmei^, QxQ\%Aznu, VLyhaboid, Oitadoup, Comperfse, 
Pap-Ava/yZ, \jo\atub, Gunp4(/b, Tam-Baja<6ien (Mog), 
Scander6ofir, Prino/bn, Constantino66/i, Colum6on^. 



12 



MEMORIA TECHNICil. 



TABLE V. 



THE RGOAL TABLE OF ENGLAND SINCE THE CONQUEST, AND 
SOME OF THE MOST REMARKABLE PRINCES BEFORE IT. 

Bef. Christ. 

CASiBELauDus chosen chief commander by the 
Britons against the invasion of Julius Caesar — 
Casibeluc^ • 52 

Anno Domini 

Queen BoADicea, the British heroine, being abused 
by the Romans, raises an army and kills 7000 — 
B6adaicp 67 

VoKTiGern invited the Saxons to the assistance of 
the Britons against the Scots and Picts — Vor- 
tigfos 446 

HfiNGist, the Saxou, erected the kingdom of Kent, 
the first of the heptarchy — Heng/u/ .... 455 

King ARTHur, famous for his powerful resistance 
and victories over the Saxons — Arihlaf . . . 514 

EGBBrt, who reduced the heptarchy, and was first 
crowned sole monarch of England — EgbeAeA • 828 

ALFREd, who founded the university of Oxford — 
AUrkkpe 872 

CANute the Dane — Can^au 1016 

Edward the CoNFESsor — Confisfe 1042 



WiLliam the CoNqueror — Wil-con«atf 
IVilliam RuFus — RufAot . . 
HENRy I. — Henrag . . . 
STEPHen — Steph6i/ .... 
HENry the SECond — Hen-s6c6tcf 
Richard I.— Ric^tn . . . 

J-ohn — Jann , 

HEnry the Tnird^He-thda^ . 
EDward h—Eddoid . . . 
EDvardus SEcundus — Ed-seQip 
EDvardus TERtius — Ed-tertes 
Richardus .S Ecundus — Ri -seMp 
Hsnry the Fourth— He-folo«n 



. Oct.U. 
. Sept. 9 . 
. Aug, 2 . 
. Dec. 2 . 
. Oct 25 . 
. July 6 . 
. April e, 
. Oct. 19. 
. Nov. 16 
. Julyl . 
. Jan. 25 . 
. June 21 
. Sept. 20 



1066 
1087 
1100 
1135 
1154 
1189 
1199 
1216 
1272 
1307 
1326 
1377 
1399 



CHR0N0L06ICA BT HISTORICA. 



Hsnry the Fifth— He.fi/<i<2 . . 
HBNry the 8ixth— H6n-si/e(f • . 
EDwardus QuARtus — £d-quar/a«J5 
£-dward the Fifth ) c i: i> jlx 
R-ichardlll. . .^-E-fi-«^** 

HsNricus Ssptimus — Hen-s^p/et/ 
HsNricus Octavus — Hen-oclyn 
EDwardus SExtus — Ed-sex/o< . 

Mary— Mary/tt* 

Elizabeth — Elzluk .... 
JAMes I. — Ja.msyd .... 
GaroIus Primus — Caro-primxe/ 
GaroIus Secuudus — Car-sec«o^ 
JAMes II. — J^mseif . . • • 
WiLliam aud Mary — WiUeik . 

ANne — Anpyb ; 

Gfiorge I. — Geop^o .... 
GEOrge II. — Geo-sepc2o» . . 
Gsorge III. — Geo-thpauz . • 
GEOrge IV. — G'to-quwrkez . • 



The Memorial Lines. 



Anno 

. Mar. 20 
. Avy, 31 
. Mar, 4 . 
^Apnl9. 
\Ju7ie 22 
. Aug. 22 
. April 22 
. Jan. 28 . 
. JulyO . 
. Nov. 17 . 
. Mar. 24 
. Mar. 27 
. Jan. 30 . 
. Feb. 6 . 
. Feb, 13 . 
. Mar. 8 . 

• Aug. 1 . 

• June 11 
. Oct. 25. 
. Jan. 29 . 



13 

Domini. 
1412 
1422 
1460 
1483 
1483 
1485 
1509 
1546 
1553 
1558 
1602 
1625 
1648 
1684 
1688 
1701 
1714 
1727 
1760 
1820 



Gasibeluc?, B6adatep» Vortig/os, Heng^uZ & Arthlaf, 
£gbeA;eA;9 AlMkpe, Gan6au, CoDf(§s/*e. 

Wil-con«aM, RufAot, Henra^, 

Steph6t7& Hen-skcbuf, Ric^ein, Jann, He-thdasSc Edc2otc/, 
"Ed-setyp, Ed-ter^e«, Ri-se^^ip, 'BLe-iotoun, He-^/ddque, 
H^n-si/edf,£d quar/ai£s;,E-fi RoA;f,Hen-s6|)/et7,Hen-oc/y9i, 
Ed-sex/o«, Mary/u^, Bizluk, Jdnasyd, Garo-prim«e/, 
Gar-secwA, JfuoMeify Wilseik, Anpyb, G'eopbo — pdoi — 
pauz — kez. 

N.B. After Ganute inclusive, one thousand is to be 
added to each. It was thought unnecessary to express 
it, it being a thing in which it is impossible that any one 
should mistake. 

If it be desired to remember in what month, and day 
of the month, each king began his reign, it may be done 
by the fallowing lines: . 



14 MBMORIA TBCHNIGA/ 

Wd-ibS'Sm-iat, Steph-de, Jam-chef-fatf, "Ri-h'jeb-edf 

"El-nap, 
Hen-g^-te/-a»-see-cfaez-gi6-ge«I-pe(f, Geor-go-ja6y An- 

chei, 
Car-chep-rtz, Ma-k, Jo-pt, Ed-nis-lot-r^-cfao-pott-re^iie. 

EXPLANATION. 

The italic letters represent the day of the month; the 
letter immediately preceding represents the month itself, 
r standing for January, f for February, ch for MarcA, 
p for April, m for ^fay, j for tAine, 1 for July, g for Au- 
gust, s for jSbptember, t for October, n for iVbvember, and 
d for December. 

Thus Steph-de, Steph King Stephen, de Dec. 2. El-nop, 
£1 Elizabeth, nap Nov. 17. In words of three or more 
syllables, the first syllable stands for all the kings of the 
same name, and the following syllables in order to answer 
to the first, second, third, &c. of that name. So Jam- 
chef-ictu: Jam denotes James I. & II., che/*(viz. March 24) 
belongs to James I., and fan (viz. Feb. 6) to James II. 
So 'Ri'U'jeb-ed: Ri denotes ail the Richards, U (viz. 
July 6) belongs to Richard I., jeb (viz. Jun.e 21) to 
Richard II., and ed (viz. 22 of the same month) to 
Richard III. 

If this be thought either too difficult or too minute, tlie 
reader may pass it over. 



TABLE VL 

CHRONOLOGICAL MISCELLANIES SINCE THE CONQUEST. 

Adoo Domiiii. 

Jerusalem regained from the Turks and GoDfriBy 
of BULloigne made king of it — God-Bultum • • 1099 

The iNQUisition first erected against the Albigenses 
— Inquisded 1222 

The Confirmation of Mi^na CHARTa by King 
Henry III.- -Chartee/ 1226 



CHRONOLOOICA BT HISTORIGA. 15 

Anno Dcmini. 

Wat TvLer's rebellion suppressed— TyllAa . . . 1381 
Jack Cade's rebellion suppressed — Cade/?y . . 1450 
MARtin LuTHer began to preach in Germany against 
indulgences, and other errors of the Church of 

Home — Mar-Luth^p 1517 

The name of PROTestants first began on occasion 
of the protestation the Lutherans made against 
the decree of the chamber of Spire against them 

— Protafen 1629 

The SMALCAiidan league, or agreement made be- 
tween the Protestants of G ermauy for their mutual 

defence at Smalcaid — Smalcalioz 1540 

The Council of TRENt began Dec. 13 — ^Tren-deca<- 

aiju 1545 

The MASsacre of Protestants at PARis — Mas- 

Parafoid 1572 

The UNited P-rovinces, under the protection of 
William, Prince of Orange, throw off the Spanish 

yoke— Un-Pfom 1679 

The Spanish iNVasion — Sp-invu^ 1588 

The GunPOWBer treason — Fowdsyl 1605 

The famous rebellion at Naples, on occasion of 
the grievous excises, headed by MasanielIo — 

Masanielsop 1647 

Oliver CROMwell usurped the government of Eng- 
land, under the name of Protector — Cromsli . . 1653 
The island of JAMAica in America taken by the 

English — Jamaicau// 1655 

CROHweili Mors — Crom-morsuA 1658 

GiBRAltar taken (capta) by the English — Gibrapzo 1704 

The Memoi'ial Lines. 

God-Bulnotf, Inquis^ec?, Chwrieel, TyllAa, Ca,defly, 
Mar-Luth^p, Prota/en, Smalcal2oz, Tren-decat-nZ/ii, 
Mas-Para2offlf, Un-P2oin, Sp-invuA^, "Povrdsyl, Masa- 

nieUop, 
Cromsli, Jamaicate/Z, Crom-mor«tei^, capta Gibrapzo. 

N. B. A thottsand is to be added as above, where it is 
not expressed. 



16 MBMORIA TBCHNICA. 



TABLE VII. 

THE PATBIARCflS BEFORE AMD AFTER THE FLOOl ■. 

An. Mud. Age. 

ADam— -Adnt« 1 — 930 

Sbth— Seth4*y-narf 130 — 912 

Enos— Endi/-»y/ 235 — 906 

CAinan— Caiec/-najs 326 — 910 

MAHALAleel— Mahala<<m/-^u/ .... 396 — 896 

JARed— Jar^sy-iuiuc/ 460 — 962 

Enoch — Enchs^d-isu 622 — 366 

METHUselah— Methu«elj9-natfn .... 687 — 969 

LAmech — h^koifpoip 874 — 777 

Noah— Noachaz^«-niM; 1066 — 960 

Shem — Shembulk-aug 1668 — 600 

ARphaxad— Ara«/ei-/A ...... 1668 — 438 

SALah— Sala«ouf-o^^ 1693 — 433 

HsBer— Hebapcrf-6«o 1722 — 464 

PELeg— Pelap^p-etott 1767 — 239 

Keu— Reuapelp-ifm' 1787 — 239 

SERug—Serak&n-diz .. , 1819 — 230 

'NAHOR^^ahorakbn-bok 1849 — 148 

TERah — TeraAolA-rfy/ 1878 — 206 

ABT3hdLm--Ahezyk'boil 2008 — 176 

ISBAc—Isebyk'beiz . 2108 — 180 

J ACOB-^HcohebaHk-bap 2168 — 147 

The Memorial Lines. 

Adniz, Sethdiy-nad, 

Endil-nyl, Cuitel-naz, Mahalatote/-Aou/, 

JdLTbsy-naudf 

'Encliid'isu, Methuseip-naun, hfikoif-poip, Noacha2;i<s- 

nuz, 
^hembulk»augt Arasl^-Jik, SaXasout'Ott, H.ehaped'6so, 
'Pelapup^etou, 'Rjeuapeip-diUf Serakdn-diz, Nahora^6n-6o^, 
Terakoik'dyl, Ahezyk-lml, laebyk-beiz, JicohebaHk-bop. 



OHRONOLOOIC^A fiT HISTORICA. 17 



TABLE VIII. 

THE PATRIARCHS, &^ ^ CCORDINO TO THEIR TEARS BEFORE 

CHRIST. 

Be£ Christ. 

Seth— S^thtAotf born 3874 

£nos s. — "Eaosipaun 3769 

GAinan s. — CeAtspou 3679 

MAHALAleel s. — Mahala^^^ 3609 

JARed s. — JsLriUf , . . . 3544 

Enoch s.—Enchtike 3382 

MBTHUselah s. — Methustto/> 3317 

LAMech s. — Lamibiz 3130 

Noah s.— NoenoA; 2948 

SHem 8.^^heff8 2446 

ARPHaxad s. — Arpheto« 2346 

SALah 8.—SB\dibb 2311 

HEBer 8.—Uihdeka 2281 

Peleg s. — Pel^gcctop 2247 

Rbu a.-^Rededap 2217 

Serug s.— Ser6gdaAtf 2185 

Nahor s.— Nahrcia// 2155 

TERah s.— Tere^i 2126 

AsRAhaH s. — Ahr^manom 1996 

Isaac s.— IsaAottf 1896 

J-^acob s. — Jakip 1837 

Lsvi s. — hevapug 1756 

The reader is desired to take notice, that in this and 
the following tables, (where it could be done consistently 
with the intended broYity,) the relation which every per- 
son bore to bim who immediately goes before, is signified 
by a single letter ; s standing for son or sister, b for brother, 
n for nephew or niece, u for uncle, g for grandson, m for 
mother. So the s after Enos shows that he was the son 
of Seth# and m> on. 



18 MBMORIA TBCITNICA. 

The Memorial Lines* 

Skihikaif, , 

"Enosipaun, Caitspou, Mahalali^fii, Jari/o/*, Enchtike, 
Methasitap, Lami^iz, NoenoA, ^^^ffs, Arphetos, Saldibb, 
"BLibdekOp "Pel^gedop, Reixedap, Serdgdaku, Nahrcfa//, 
Terebes, Abriimanous, Isakovs, Jakip, Levopuisque. 



TABLE IX. 

THE JUDGES OF ISRAEL, FROM THE DEATH OF HOSES TO 

SAMUEL. 

BeC Christ. 

Moses M-oritur (dies) — Mos-mo^ 1451 

JosHua — J6shfol 1445 

OTHoniel— Othostf 1405 

Buvd—Ehutel 1325 

DEBorah— Debo(/ei/ / . . 1285 

Gideon— Gi(£o/ 1 . . 1245 

AsiMelech — Ahmets 1236 

THoLa— Tble« 1233 

3 Air — Jsiidaz 1210 

JsPHTha — Jephtakk 1188 

iBzan — Ibza^e 1182 

Elod— EloAoi/ 1176 

Abdon — Abdona«o 1164 

Ehi—EWbup 1157 

SAMuel — Sam6ap 1117 

The Memorial Lines^ 

Mos-mo2a, J6shfol, Othbzu, Ehutel, Dehodeil, Gidol, 

AhmetSy 
Thlett, J&idaz, Jephtakk, Ibz^, Elokoil & Elibup, 
AbdoncMO, SBmbap, 

N. B, One thousand is to be added. The dates affixed 
to the Judges before Abinielech are supposed to relate, 
not to the beginning of their presiding over Israel, but to 
the end of the rest given by them. — Vide the preface to 
Petavii Ratumarium, 



CHRONOLOGIOA £T HI8TORICA. 19 



TABLE X. 

KINOS OF ISRAEL AMD JUDAH. 

KINGS OF ALL ISRAEL. 

Bcf. Christ. 

Saul — Saula^mu 1095 

DAvid — DaTazie/ . 1055 

SoLOMon s. — Solomdzal 1015 

The Defection of the Ten Tribes .... 975 

KINGS OF JUDAH. 

REHoboam s. — "Relionoil 975 

Asijam s. — Ahinup 957 

Asa 8.:— Asanu/ 955 

JeHOSAPHAt 8. hosaphaii69 914 

JeHOjtain s. — - — horAein 889 

AHAZiah s.— Ahazi^^tf ......... 885 

ATHaLiah m. — AthliAA:o 884 

JeHOAASH g. hoaash^oiil 878 

AMAziah s. — AmazAin . 839 

Uzziah or AzARiah s. — Uz-AzariA% .... 810 

JoTHam s.--JothptiA 758 

Ahaz 8. — Ahizpod 742 

HEZEkiah s. — Hezepep ......... 727 

MANasseh s. — Mans6u^ 693 

AlcON 8. — Am6nsot 643 

JosiAhs. — JosiaMxs 640 

JeHoiAKiM s. hoiakimj^. 609 

JeHOlAKin 8. hoiakau^ 600 

ZEDEKiah u, — ZedekiMei 598 

KINGS OF ISRAEL. 

JEROBoaro son of Nebat — Jerobnot7 975 

N-adab s.— Nnte/ 954 

BAAsha— Baania 953 

ElAh 3.— Elnu 990 

ZiMri, TiBni, and Omri — Zim-Tibncii .... 929 



20 MEMORIA TBOHNICA. 

Bef. ChritL 

OmH alone — Omnel 925 

Ahab 8. — Ahibnak 918 

AHAZiah — Ahszikaup 897 

JoRam b. — Jorknau 896 

Jehu — Jehakko 884 

Jehoahaz s. — Jehoah^Mau 856 

JeHOASH 8. hoashA:m •....••. 839 

JBRoboam II. s. — Jero8eA<^ ..•••.. 825 

ZACHARiAh 8. — Zacharapp^ 773 

SHALLUm s. of Jabesh — Shallu/ipe 772 

Men Ahem s. of Gadi — Menapjpe 772 

PsKAlah 8. — Pekaipsa 761 

PEKAh — PekaptMt 759 

Hosea s. of £lah — Hospi;s ••..•••. 730 

The Memorial Lines. 

Saxilaznu, Darazul, Soloin^2a/> Reho-Jerobitot/. 

Abiftttp, Asanulf — bosaphan^o, — bor^em, AhaziA:^^ 
AthliMo, — hoaasb^oi^, AmazA:tn, IJz-Azari^6y, 
Jotbptf^ & Ab^zfKMf, Hezepep, Mans6«^ & Am6n<o^, 
Josifuoz, — boiakinM2^> — hoiakav^, Zedeki/net. 

'Nnuf, BtOMUty lElniz, Zim-Tibnen, Omnel, AhdbnuA;, 
Abazi^oiep, JorknaUf Jehukko, Jeboaha^lau, 
— hoasb^in, JeroseMu, Zacharappf, Sballuppe, Menappe, 
Pekaipfa, Peka/mn, Hospiz. 

JV. JB. The break before 8ome of the words denote8 that 
Je i8 wanting, as — bosaphan^ for Jehosapban^, -"horkein 
for Jehor^ein, &c. 



TABLE XI. 

THE PROPHETS. 

Bet Chnft. 

JoNas prophesied against Nineyeh— Joukse • • 802 
Joel prophesied — Joeiy • • • • • • • • 800 



CHBONOLOGICA BT HISTORICA. 21 

Be&Oiriat. 

Amos prophesied against King Jeroboam — Ampe^p 787 

HosBa prophesied against Israel — Hosepibi • . 785 

Isaiah began to prophesy — hpawg 760 

NAHUm prophesied against Nineveh — N^humcA . 758 
Micah prophesied against Judah and Jerusalem — 

Niicput • ; • 763 

JsRemiah began to prophesy — Jenta ..... 631 

ZEPHaniah prophesied — Zephavto 630 

HABAkkak prophesied — Habaxyn 609 

£zEktel in captivity had his first vision — £ze&m/ . 605 
OBADiah prophesied against the Edomites — Oba- 

dUkoi 587 

D-aniel had hb vision of the four empires — DuU • 555 

HAGgai prophesied — Hag/es ....••• 520 

ZscHARiah prophesied^Zechar^(/« 520 

MALACHi wrote his book, which was the end of 

vision and prophecy — Malachiiip ..... 307 

The Memorial Lines. 

Jonkze, Joeig, Ampeip, 'H.oaepku, Ispauz, Ndhu/wA, 
Micput, Jerfto, ZephatUar, HBhasyn, Ezehuif Obadittoi*, 
DuU, Hagles, Zechar^fi£s, Malachinp. 



TABLE XII. 

XINOS or ASSYRIA AND BABYLON. 

UMGS or ASSYRIA AFTER THB DISSOLUTION Of THE ANCIENT ASSYRIAN 
EMPIRE UPON THE DEATH OF SARDANAPALUS. 

BeC Chtiit. 

ARBAces — ArhtLpop 747 

SALManeser s. — Salm/ieA 728 

SBNNACHerib s. — Scnnachot^o 714 

EsARHADdon third s. — Esarhadopsau .... 706 

KINGS OF BABYLON. 

BsLBsis — Belespop • . • • 747 

NADius— Nad/ii/ . . • 734 



22 MEMORIA TBCHNICA. 

Bet Cairist. 

CHlDzirns*! 

Porus . . > — Chi«Po-Jugpe« 726 

JuG%us .3 

Mardok EMpadus — Empea 721 

ARKianus — Arkpyn • . • 709 

Belt BUS — Belibup^e ^ • 702 

Apron adius — Aprooamm ...••••• 699 

RbgibiIus— Kegibsni 693 

Mssessimordacus — Messaud, .••••.. 692 

After his death followed an interregnum of eight years, 
of which EsarhaddoD, King of Assyria, taking the advan- 
tage, seized Babylon, and addhig it to his former empire, 
thenceforth reigned oyer both for thirteen years. 

KINGS OF ASSYRIA AND BABYLON JOINTLY, THE ROYAL SBAT BOHB- 
TIME8 AT NINEVEH, AND SOMCTIMEB AT BABYLON. 

Bef. Christ. 

Esarhaddon, called in Ptolemy's Canon Assar- 

Addinus — AssMsky 680 

SAOsduchinus s. — Sa6s«imjp 667 

CHYNiladanus — Chyn«op 647 

Cbyniladanus having made himself despicable to his 
people, NabopoUasar, general of his army, set up for 
himself; and being a Babylonian by birth, made use of 
his interest there to seize that part of the Assyrian empire, 
and reigned king of Babylon twenty-one years. And in 
the fourteenth year of his reign, having made an affinity 
with Astyages, the eldest son of Cyaxares, by the marriage 
of his son Nebuchadnezzar with Amyitis, the daughter of 
Astyages, entered into a confederacy with him against the 
Assyrians, and thereon joining their forces together, th^y 
besieged Nineveh; and after having taken Uie place, and 
slain Saracus the king, (who was either the successor of 
Chyniladanus, or he himself under another name,) to 
gratify the Medes, they utterly destroyed that great and 
ancient city, and from that time Babylon became the sole 
metropolis of the Assyrian empire. Vide Prideaua^s Con" 
nexwn, Part I. Book 1. 



GHRONOIiOeiCA BT HISTOBIGA. 23 



KINaS OF BABTLOW. 



NABOPOiiasar — Nabopol<el 025 

NsBuchadnezzar s. — Nebtyt ••..... fM)6 

EviLmerodoch s. — ^yillaub 561 

NERiGlissar b. ia law — Nerig/im ...... 559 

*Laborosoarchod s J ->j ^^, , 

NABonadius s. of Evilmerodoch J "" ^ *^'^* • ' ^^ 
DarIus the MsDe, i.e. Cyaxares, uncle of Cynigy 
to whom Cyrus allowea the title of all hb cod- 
quests as long as he lived — Dar-Med/tA . . . 538 
By his taking Babylon ended the BABYLonish empire, 
after it had continued 209 years — Reg-Babylezov. 

The Memorial Lines, 

▲SSTBIA. 

Arbapop & Salmpek, Sennachot^o, Esarhadop^oic. 

BABYLON. 

Belespop, Nadpif, Chi-Po-Jugpes, Empea, Aikpyu, 
Belibupis«^ Apronaunn, Regib«ni, Mesimd, — Assartfty, 
Sa6ssaup9 ChyuMp, — NabopoUe/, Neb<y#, Cvil^te^, 
Nerig/tfn, Nabo/u/, Dw-Medlik, Reg-Babylezotc. ^ 



TABLE XIII. 

KINOS 09 SOYPT, MEDIA, AND FBRSIA. 

KINGS OF EOTPT.f 

Bef. Christ. 

Sabacou the iEthiopian — Sabacopdloi . • . • 727 
SEVechus s. — Seypan • 719 



* For the reason why JLahorosoarckod is not named in Ptolemy's 
Canon, see Prideanx^s Connexion^ Part I. Book 9. 

t Of the ancient Kio^a of Kgypt, from Mizraim or filifiDet, we 
have little else bat tlie names, or fabaloos accoimts. 



34 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

Bef. Christ. 

TiRHAkah, last of the Ethiopians — TirhApyl . . 705 

Confederacy of the 12 Princos — Pm-b^-skei . . 688 

PsAMMiTicbus— Psammit«py 670 

Necus s. — Necussas . 616 

PsAMMis s. — Psammau^ 600 

ApRies s.— Aprten^ 594 

Am A sis — Amas^uit 569 

PsAMmiNiTus s. who was conquered by Cambyses, 

son of Cyrus — Psaminit/e/ 525 



UNaS or MEDIA AFTER THE REVOLT OF THE IIEDES FROM 

BENNACBERIB. 

Dsjoces — Dejopzau 709 

PHRAortes s. — Phra«2att 666 

OYAXAres s. — Cyaxaw/" 634 

AsTyages s. — Astuno 594 

*Craxares II.— Cy-d-Acn • • 559 



KINGS OF PERSIA. 

Cyrus — Cyruts 536 

CAMBYses s. — Camby^en 529 

tOROpastes Magus . . ) — Oro-Mag-Dar- 7 .^ 

DARius s. of HYSTAspes ) Hysta^ . , . ) ^ 

XsRxes s. by Atossa, daughter of Cyrus — Xerxo^ 485 

Artaxerxes LoNCimanus third s. — hongfauf . . 464 
XsRxes II. s. slain by . .\ 

Soodianus bast. b. slain by f — Xerrf-Sog-Dar- 7 .^^ 
Ochus bastard b. commonly C Nothocfi . • . j 
called DarIus Nothus . J 



* Gyazares succeeded Astyages in the ciYil goyernment, and 
Cyrus, grandson of Astyages, by his daughter Mandane, in the 
military gOYernment. 

^ Herodotus calls him Smerdu; Ctesias, Spendadateti Xtr 
ehyius, Mardut; and in Scripture be is called Antaxtrxu, 



GHRONOL061CA BT HISTORICA, 25 

Bef. Chriiit. 

Arsaces eldest s. commonly called Artaxerxes 

MNemon — Mnoyf . 404 

OcHus s. — Ochilk 358 

ARses youngest s. — Antip 331 

Darius CoDOMAnnus» descended from Darius No- 

thus — CodomvLttu .......... 33d 

The Memorial Lines, 

EGYPT. 

Sabacopclot, Sevpan, Tirhvtpyl, 'Prin-bi'skei, Psammit«py, 
Necussas, Psammau^, Aprun/*, Amasldun, Psaminit/e/. 

MEDIA. 

Dejopzou, Phras2att, Cyaxan/*, Asttino^ Cy-d-lun, 

PERSIA. 

Camby^eit, Oro-Mag-Dar-Hysta^, Xerxo^u> Long- 

Xero-Sog-Dar-Nothodiy TAnoyf, Ochilk, Arsdp, Codo- 
mal^tt. 



TABLE XIV. 

THB DIFFERENT NAMES OF THE SAMS PERSONS IN SCRIPTURE 

AND IN PROFANE AUTHORS. 

*ARBaces . . . fTiolath Pileser, 2 Kings xy. 29. 

NA^'^Lir: : : } BALAdan, /,«. Kxix. 1. 
Mardok Empadus Merodach BALADan, ibid, 

Assar-Addinus . . { ft'll'*****' V *^^* *'*• *'' 

( AsNAPper, Ezra iv. 10. 

§NABONADius . • BfiLSHazzar, Daniel y. 1 and 29. 

CTAxares . . . DARius the M>ede, i>ante/ iii. 31. 

SABacon . . . . So» 2 Kings xvii. 4. 

* Galled also by Castor, Niniw, junior. 

t Also ThUgamus and Thilgath Pilneser. 

X Called also by Nicolas Damascenus, Nawbrwi* 

§ Called also by Berosus, Nabonnedus ; by Megasthenes, Na- 
bonnidodins; by Herodotas, Labynetus; and by Jofephus, Nobih 
amddma* 



26 

Necus . . 
FARAchus • 
ApRies . • 
Dsjoces . . 
*ARTaxerxes 
LoNGimanus 

SALManeser 

SENnacberib 
AsTYages . 
SEvechus 
SAOsduchinus 
CAMbyses . 
SmerdIs 



MEMORIA TECHNIGA. 

. . PharaobNECHo, 2CAro. xxxy.20. 
TiRHakab, Isa. xxxvii. 9. 
Pharaoh HoPHrah, Jer. xUt. 30. 
ARPHAxad, Judith i. 1. 

> AHASuerus, Esther ii. 16. 

C ENEmessar, Tobit i. 2. 
( Shalmod, Hosea x. 14. 

Sargod, Isaiah xx. 1. 

AHASuerus, Daniel ix. 1. 

SETHon, Herodotus 2. 
fNABUchodonosor, Judith i. 1. 

AHASuerus, JEzra iy. 6. 

ARTaxerxes, Ezra iv. 7. 

The Memorial Lines, 

Arb-Tig, Bel-Bala-Nab, Nabonad-Belsh, Dar-M-Cya, 

Sab- So, 
Dej-Arphax, Apr-Hoph, Empdd-Balad, Ass-Esar-Asnap, 
Sen-Sarg, Salm-Ene-Shalm, Sev-Seth, Sa6s-Nabu, 

Smerd-Art, 
Tirh-Tara, Nech-Necus, Art-Long-Asty-Ahas, Cam- 

Ahasque. 



TABLE XV. 

JLINGS OF EGYPT AND SYRIA, AFTER THE DEATH OF ALEX- 
ANDER THE GREAT. 

KINGS OF EGYPT. Bef. Christ. 

Ptolemaeus Lagus or Soter — Lag/yo 304 

Ptol. PnilAdelphus s.— Phadifco or Philrfei/ . . 284 

Ptol. Euergetes s.^Budos 246 

Ptol. Pflilopator s.— Ptol-Phe«6 221 

Ptol. EpiPHanes s.— Ptol-Epiphea:o .... 204 

Ptol. PniloMetor s. — Phomftm 180 

* Archbishop Usher thinks that Darias Hystaspes was the K. 
Ahasuerus that married Esther ; Scaliger, that Xerxes was. 

t Nabuchodonosor was a name among the Babylonians, com- 
monly given to their kings, as that of Fharaoh was among the 
Egyptians. 



CHRONOLOGICA £T HI8T0RICA. 27 

Bet Christ. 

Ptol. Physcod b.— Physco6/tt 145 

Ptol. Lathyrus s.— Lathyracb ...... 120 

ALEXANder n. — Alex^nky 80 

Ptol. AuLetes bastard s. of Lathyrus — Au\aul . 65 

CLEOPATra d.— Cleopat/a 51 

KINGS OF SYRIA. 

Selcucus Nicanor — Stl-'Nitad ...... 312 

ANTiochus Soter s. — ADti-Soc/otn ..... 279 

A-ntiochus Theos s. — A-Thedauz 260 

SsLeucus CALlinicus s. — Sel-CtAdfu .... 245 

Seleucus Ceraunus s. — Ceraunee/ 225 

ANTiochus Magdus b. — Ant-Magclee .... 222 

SELeucus PHilopator s. — Sel-Phai^ .... 186 

ANtiochus £-piphanes b. — An-£^i/ .... 175 

ANTiochus Eupator s. — Ant-£iipaso .... 164 
DEMetrius S-oter s. of Seleucus Philopator — Dem- 

Sdse 162 

ALexander BALa — Al-Bal^2 150 

D-emetrius Nicator son of Demetrius Soter — D- 

Nico/i* 145 

Antiochus SiDETes b. — Sid^t^os 140 

D-emetrius Nicator — D-Nica/y ...... 180 

ZEBina— Zeb6c/ 125 

Antiochus Grypus son of Demetrius Nicator — 

Grypadi 123 

Seleucus s. — Seleucou« ........ 96 

Philip b.— Philipwc 92 

TiGRANes King of Armenia — Ti^iineit ... 83 

The Memorial Lines. 

EGYPT. 

Lagtyo, PharfAo, "Eudos, Ptol-Phecft, Ptol - Epipheao, 

PhomAets, 
PhyscoA/tt, LdithjYadz, Alexan^, Aulaul, Cleopat/a. 

SYRIA. 

S^l-Nitocf, Anti.Soc2otn, A-Thedauz, Sel-Cal^ftc, Ce- 
raunee/, 

ci 



.^' 



28 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

Ant-Magdee, Sel-Pha^s, An-Mboil, AnUEdpcuo, Denn 

Al-Bal6tes, D-Nico/u, Sidet6o2, D-Nicafy, Zehbel, 
Grypodt, Seleucotw, Philipn^, Tigrineit. 



TABLE XVI. 

JEWISH HIOH PaiESTSi &c. AFTER THE RETURN FROM THE 

CAPTIVITY. 

Bef. Christ. 

Jeshua son of Jozadack — Jeshiia/ts 536 

JoiAKim s. — JoiakoA:^ 483 

EliasHib s. — Ehholt 453 

JoiADah 8. — Joiadoat 413 

*JoHANAN 8. — Johan^otpf. •*..... 373 

jADdua— Jadu^o6 341 

ONias Primus s.— On-primu2a ...... 321 

SiMon the J-ust s. — Sim-jt^r 300 

ELBAzar b. — Ele^dna 291 

MANASSeh son of Jaddua, and uncle of Simon Uie 

Just — M^Luisaeps • • . 276 

fONias S-ecundus son of Simon the Just — On-sdu* 250 

SiMon SECundus s. — Sim-secdop 217 

ONias T-ertius 8. — On-iboul 195 

Jasou b. — Jas6ot7 175 

MENELaus b. — Menel&pe 172 

On the death of Menelaus, Alcimus was made 

high priest by Antiochus Eupator. After him, 

Jonathan, brother of Judas, was made high 

priest by Alexander Bala. 

Judas M Acc AB^us (s. of JVfattathiaSjdescended from 

Asmonsus) captain of the Jews — Ju-M^ccaboM; 166 

JoNAthan b. — J6na6au2 160 

Simon MACcabseus — Si-JVfac6o^ 143 

* Called also Jonathan. Nehemiah x. U. 

t He being an infant at his father's death, Eleazar was mad« 
high priest. 



CHRONOL06ICA ET HISTORICA. 29 

Bcf. Christ 

HYRCanus s. — Hircafic 135 

K* ARistobulus s. — K-Ar&^« 106 

Alexander Jannsbus b. — Jannasu ..... 105 

ALexANDRa w. — Alx^ndroi^ 78 

(AristobuIus SECundus younger s. K. — Arist6b- 

aecaun) • 69 

HYRCAnus Secundus elder b. H. P. — Hyrca- 

secundsi 63 

Antjgonus younger son of AristobuIus K — Anti- 

gono2 ... 40 

Herod son of Antipas K. — Herodl4 ... 38 

ARCHELaus K. — ArcheU 3 

The Memorial Lines, 

JeshfiaZu, Joiako^^, "Ehholt, Joiadoo/, Johandntp/, 
Jaduto^, On-ptimida, Sim-jt^, Ele^na, Manassept, 
On-adttZy Sim-secc^op, On-tboul, Jas6ot7, Menel^pe, 
Ju-Maccaba««, J6na6aus;, Si-Ms-cbot, Hyrcatu, K-Arbys, 
JsLunazu, AlxlndroiA, Arist6b-secateny Hyrca-secundn> 
Antigonosr, HerodIA, Archek. 



TABLE XVII. 

FOUNDERS, &c. OF ANCIENT MONARCHIES. 

Bef. Christ 

NiNusfounderof the Assyrian monarchy — 'Ninezlou 2059 
SEMiramis wife of Ninus — Semanaul .... 1965 
SARDANapalus in whom ended the Assyrian mo- 
narchy — Sardanpop or paup 747 or 767 

ZEciALeus, King of Sicyon — JE^Mizkau • . . 2089 
iNachus first King of Argos — Ina^tw .... 1856 
The OcTGian flood, under Ogyges King of Attica 

— OgygapatM 1766 

PRometheus, son of Japetus, brother of Atlas— 

Pra*Aoi 1687 

CECrops first King of Athens — Cec^^tM . r • • 1556 
Sisyphus first King of Corinth — Sisyph^/20 • • 1504 



30 MfiMOKIA TfiCHNICA. 

BetCbrisL 

TEUCer first King of Troy—Teucbuzd . . . 1602 

Cadmus first King of Thebes — Cadmdjko . . .1494 
SATurn expelled Crete by his son Jupiter, setUed 

in ItaAy—SAidtty 1330 

FERSeus first King of Myceoe — ^Persato^ . . • 1313 
HERcules, son of Jupiter by Alcmena — Herbdoif 1274 
The ARGonautic expedition — Axg6bdaiqf . . . 1267 

OEDipus King of Thebes— 06di6m 1266 

THEseusson of iBgeus— The86</t/ 1234 

*CoDRus the last King of Athens — Codrdzpa . • 1071 
C AR ANUS first King of Macedon — CaranAof . . 814 
CANDATJles King of Lydia — Candaupfu . • • 735 

Crcesus King of Lydia — Crodsiise 562 

Cyrus, founder of the Persian empire — Cyruts . 536 
ALEXander, founder of the Grecian empire — Alexito 331 
J u lius Csesar , f ou nder of the Roman empire — Ju los 46 

The Memorial Lines. 

Ninezlou, Semanaul, 8ardanj9op, JEgial^^^mf, 
Inakus, Ogygapaus, Praskoi, Cecblus, Sisyph^izOy 
TevLcbuzd, Cndrndfrio, Saidtty, 'P^natat, Jlerbdoift 
Arg6bdaup, O^dibess, Thesbdif, Codrdzpa, Caiankafp 
Candaupfic, Cross^se, Cyruis, Alexito, Julos. 



TABLE XVIII. 

GRECIAN HISTORY. 

Bef. Chrbt. 

The THEBan war— Thebacte/ 1225 

First MESSenian war— Messpof ...•.• 743 

* After the death of Codras the Athenians had perpetual 

ArchoDS, the first of which was Medoh — M&iazaiz . 1070 
Then decennial Archons, the first of which was Charops 

— Charoppwo 754 

Then annual Archons, the first of which was Crboii-^ 

Creteiz .660 

MedazoiZf Charoppno, Creteh* 



CEIRONOLOGICA ET HISTO 

Bef. Christ* 

Second MESsenian war — Messku G85 

Battle of Marathod — itlarath^ns 490 

Battle of Sal A Mis — SalamoA;^ . 480 

Battle of Eur YMEDon — Eurymedop* .... 470 

The PELOponnesian war — Pelo/ib 431 

Battle of Leuctra — Leuctrafpi 373 

Battle of iVlANTinea — Mantm 368 

PHOCaean or sacred war — Phoct'/p 357 

Battle of the River Gran icus — Grani^i/ . . . 334 

Battle at the Issus — Isstit 333 

Battle of Ar Beta— -A rba6 331 

ALExander the Great succeeds Philip — Alexiis . 336 

Philip ARidaeus— Ari/c* 323 

Alexander ^6us—^gfa« 316 

The Memorial Lines, 

Theh€^el & Messpot, Messku, Marath6nz, ^sldLxnoky, 
Eurymedops;, Pelofib, Leuctrafjoi, Mantm, PhoctVp, 
GTRuitiff Isstit, Arhtib, Alex/t«, Aritet, lEgtas. 

N. B. After the death of Alexander there arose great 
confusion among his Generals about the succession, each 
seizing what he could for himself; till, by leaguing and 
making war against each other, they were, after some 
years, all destroyed except four. These were Cassander, 
Lysimachus, Ptolemy, and Seleucus, who divided the 
whole empire. 

CASSander had MAcedon and GREece. 

LYsimachus had Thracc and those parts of Asia 

situated upon the Hellespont and the Bosphorus. 
PTOLemy had 5il-gypt, LiBya, A-rabia, PALestine, 

and Coelo-SYria. 
Seleucus all the rest of Asia, &c. 

The Memorial Line. 
CiLsd-magre, Lys-thrachebos, Ptol-delibapalsy, Seleuc-as. 



32 M£MORIA TBOHNIGA. 



TABLE XIX, 

GRECIAN LAWGIVERS, PHILOSOPHERS, AND POETS. 

Bcf. Christ. 

LYCurgus born — hycnes 926 

Draco — Drasdo 624 

Solon died — So/vn 659 

PYTHAGoras died aged 80— Pythag/y« .... 606 

Euclid the geomet. Nourished — Euclozatc . . . 406 

So c Rates died — Socrinn 399 

XENOPHon died — Xen6pht/btt 369 

PLAto died— Plafojfc 348 

Diogenes died aged 90 — Diotet 323 

ARistotle died aged 63— Arise^(2 . . . . . . 322 

Epicurus died aged 72 — Epicuc(pa 271 

ARCHimedes slain — Archidad 212 

Linus and Orpheus — Linad^a • • . • . • 1281 

HoMer died — Homnad 912 

Archilochus — ArchilochufAate 686 

Sappho— Sapph^d 602 

ANAcreon — Aniclaud 692 

iPiSCHylus born — Mschlel 625 

PiNDar died aged 80— Pind/<$2 440 

SoPHOCLes born — Sophoclozoi ...... 407 

THBocRitus flourished — 1'he6cr«Aru 286 

Lycophrou flourished — Lycophrepz 270 

The Memorial Lines* 

hycnes, "Drisdo, Solun, Vythiglys, 'Euclozau, Socrtnn, 
Xen6phtfoii, Pia^o^, Dio^ef, AristSd, Epicudpa, 
Arch'idadt Linadka, Homna^i & Archilochu«^ate, 
Sapphic/ & Andc/oud, JEschlel, Piudf 6z, Sophoclo20t» 
'^rhe6cre^ie, Lycophrepz. 



GHRONOLOGICA ET HISTORICA. 33 



TABLE XX. 

ROMAN HISTORY. 

The foundation uf KoMe was laid in the 3961st year 
of the Julian Period — Rom-pinsa ; anno Mundi 3251 — 
l^om-miduh; in the year before Christ 753, or as some 
752 — ^omput ; upon the 22d day of ApriI-— Apride ; 
in the 4th year of the 6th OLympiad— /ol«. 

The KEGal SxATe under seven kings lasted 245 
years — Stat-regcfo/. 

Bet Chriit. 

RoMulus — Rompte^ 753 

NuMa Pompilius — Numpa/' 714 

Tullus HosTiLius — HostiUpy . 670 

Angus Martius—Anc^tp 637 

Tartjuinius Friscus— Priscjo/* 614 

SERvius Tullius — Servups 576 

Tarquinius SuPERbus — Super/?(£ 532 

The Memorial Lines. 

Stat-regefo/, 

Rom-pinsa, 'Rom-midub, Romputfois A^ride, "Sianpaf, 
Hostil«py, Ancsip, Vriscsaf, Servupsque Super /id. 



TABLE XXI. 

The Consular STATe, from Brutus and Collatinus the 
first consuls, to the period when Julius Cassar was 
made perpetual dictator, lasted 464 years — Stat-con- 
sularoso. 

Bef. Christ. 

CoNSUls first made — Consulzot ....#. 507 

First Dictator — Diconoi 497 

Creation of the TRiBunes — ^Tril^^btdf . . « . . 492 

Creation of the DECEMviri — Decemyoly • w • 450 

c3 



-% 



*V a>l VTIUt X XXV1UU9 XlLAUg Vk JUUIIUS—- X VlMVtrfi • • J^ t 

First PuNic war . 1 tj„,i -o i . f 2( 

Second PuNic war . } BELlum-Bel-punen- \ ^^ 
Third PuNic war . ) «ui«-ooit ••••(!. 



Gonsulsroi, Diconoi, Tvibfaud, DecemToiy, MiUtfoz, 
Incendikk, Samnl/e, Vyrdoin, BeU^punesi-das-bok, 
Gracchacfe, Jugubzou, Cim6a^, Italeiit, Mithridat^ou, 
8yl-dictef;;, Cstilaud, Trun, Pharsop, Bat-philo6, Acta. 



TABLE XXII. 

THE TWELVE C^SARS. 

Bet Christ. 

I. Julius Caesar — Julios 46 

II. Augustus great n. — Auguste/ • • . . 25 

Anno Oomini. 

III. TiBERius step-s. — Tiber^tt 15 

IV. CAUGULa great n. — Caliguh'A .... 38 



i 



34 MEMORIA TEGHNICA. 

Bef. Christ 

Creation of the MiLitary T-ribunes— Mil-t/b« . . 440 
iNCENDium Urbis, or the burning of the city by 

the Gauls — IncendtM 388 

War %Tith the SAMNites — $amn(/e 342 

War with PvRrhus King of Epirus — Pyrrfotn . . 279 

First PuNic war . 1 ti__i x»_i .. ( 263 

216 
148 
The end of the sedition of the GRACCHi — Grac- 

chade 122 

The JuGUrthine war — Jugubzou 109 

War with the CiMbri— Cimfca^ 113 

The social or IxALian war — Italein 89 i 

War begun with MiTHRiDATes — MithridatAou . 89 | 

DiCTatorshipof SYLla — Syl-dictef2r 80 i 

Cat I Line's conspiracy — Catilatu/ 62 

First TRiumT irate — ^Trwn 59 

Battle of PHARSalia — Pharsop 47 

BATtle of PniLippi — Bat-philo6 41 

Battle of Actium — Ac/a 31 

The Memorial Lines, 
Stat-consularo«o, 



GHRONOLOGICA £T HISTORICA. 35 

Addo Domini. 

y. CLAudius UD. — Cleuod 42 

VI. Nero step-s. — Neni/ 65 

XI. Titus s.— Titpou 79 

XII. DoMiTian b. — DomitAa 81 

The Memorial Lines, 

Julios, Augustel, — Tiber6u, CaliguhA, Claod, 
Neru/, Galb-Othosou, Vit-Vespot», Tiipou, Domit^a. 

N. B. The reign of Julius Caesar is here supposed to 
commence from the death of Pompey, which made way 
for his absolute power soon after ^ the reign of Augustus 
from the full establishment of his authority by the senate 
and people. Some reckon it as commencing from the 
death of Anthony; and others, yet sooner, from the 
death of Julius Caesar. 



TABLE XXIII. 

THE ROMAN EMPERORS FROM KERVA TO JOVIAN. 

Anno Domini. 

XIII. NERVa — NervoiM 96 

XIV. TRAJan—TranA: 98 

XV. ADRian— Adri6a/7 117 

XVI. ANToninus Pius — Ant^ip ..... 137 

XVII. ANToninus PHilosophus s. — Ant-phi6sa 161 

XVIII. CoMMODus s. — Comm6d6et2 .... 180 
XIX. PERTinax . . .1 

XX. Didius JuLianus . i Pert- Juli-San/ . 19^ 
XXI. Septimius S-everus • } 

XXII. CARacalla&Geta ss.— Car-Gda6 . . 211 

XXIII. MACrinus&D-iadumenus) Mac-D-He- ) 217 

XXIV. HEliogabalus . • . .) dap-k. .) 218 
XXV. ALexander S-everus — Al-SSdd . . . 222 



S6 MEMORtA TBCHNICA. 

I 
Anno Domini. | 

XXVI. M-aximinus & M-aximus— M-Mefit 236 < 

XXVII. Prpienus and B-albinus— Pu-BrfiA: 238 

XXVIII. GoRdian-Gorrfm 239 J 

XXIX: PHilip— PhejOr 244 ^ 

XXX. Decius— Decidon 249 

XXXI.*Gal1us & Volusian-Gal-V6cffa . 251 

XXXII. VALERian— Val6re/i 253 

XXXIII. GALlieNus— Galnrfattz. .... 260 ] 

XXXIV.fFlavius CLaudius— ClesA .... 268 ! 

XXXV. AuRelian— Aurepa 270 . 

XXXVI. TACitus— Tacidoi/ 275 I 

XXXVIL Probus— Probdow 276 

XXXVIII. Carus and his sons C-arinus and 

Numerian — Car-C-NurfA:e . . 282 
XXXIX. Dioclesiau & MAximian— Di-Max- 

deif 284 

XL. Constantius Chloi'us & GALerius — 

Chlo-Gaky* .303 

XLI. jCoNStantine the Great—Cons/y* . 306 
XLII. FiLii CoNStantini, the three sons of 
Constantine, viz. Constan tine, Con- 
stantius, & Constans — Fil-Consfi^ 337 
XLIII. JuLian, nephew to Constantine the 

Great— Julwa 361 

XLIV. Jovian— Jovtew/ 364 

• Gallus. Between Gallus and Valerian, some writers rank 
^niilian among^ the number of emperors ; but because he was 
never established in the empire, nor his title generally acknow- 
ledged, others more justly place him only among the usurpers. 

t Flayius Claudius. Upon the death of Claudius, Aurelian 
was unanimously chosen by the army: and at the same time Quin- 
tillus, brother to Claudius, was proclaimed emperor in Italy, and 
his election allowed by the senate ; but finding himself unable to 
support his cause against Aurelian, he despatched himself, by 
causing his Teins to be opened, after a short reign only of seven- 
teen days, before he was rightly settled in his empire * for which 
reason he is here omitted. 

X Constantine was saluted Emperor of the West upon the 
^eath of his father Constantius Chlorus ; but was not sole monarch 
till the defeat and death of Licinius, An. Dom. S23 — Licinitef. 
He removed the imperial seat to BTZANtium in the year 380— 
Byzantiz. 



« 



GHRONOLOGICA BT HISTORICA. 



37 



The Memorial Lines. 

Nervoiw, Tnnk, Adribap, Anibip, AnUphibsa, Com- 

mGdbeiz, 
Pert-Juli-San/, Car-Grfa6, Mac-D-IIerfa/i-A, AUS6dd, 

M-Metu, Pu-BrfiA, 
Gorrfin. Plie/J, Decirfon, Gal- V6rf/a, Val6re/i, Galnrfaiiz, 
Clesh, Aurepz, TsLcidoil, Vvohdois, Car-C-NurfAe, Di- 

M^xdeif, 
Chlo-Gakt^^, CoBstySf Fil-Consltp, Jult«a, Jovtauf. 



TABLE XXIV. 



THE DIVISION OF THE EMPIRE. 



EASTERN. 

VALens; — YbUso , . 
THEodosiusMAGnus — 

The-Mag^oti? . . 
ARcadius — Arctoul . 
THEodosius JuNior— 

Theo-J6no2;ei . . 
MARcian — Msvcolz . 
Leo— L^ofoi' . . . 
Zeno— Zeno/po . . 
AnastasIus — Ana- 

sta/ita ' 

JusTin — Justlak . . 
Justin Ian — Justini/ep 

* « • « • 
Pnocas — Yhocauze . 

• • « * • 
Leo Isauricus — Le- 



ispap 



iRENe — Ir^npoup . 
BasIHus MACEdo — 
Bas-Mace^dup. . 



A. D. 

364 

379 
305 

408 
450 
457 

474 

491 
518 
527 

602 



717 
797 

867 



WESTERN. 



A.D. 



V A LenTiN lan — Valti- 

nitauf 364 

GRAtian — Gratot7. . 375 
VALeQtiniaa the S-e- 

cond — Val-siA^ . . 383 
HoNOrius-i-Hono^itt . 393 
VAlentiuian the T-hird 

— Va-t^cto ... 424 
MAximus A Vitus — 

Max-Avi/u/ . . . 455 
MAJorian — Majo/p . 457 

• * • * • 
A.UGUSTulus, in whom 

ended the western 

empire — August/bi/ 475 
The restoration of the 

western empire by 

CHARLeMagne — 

Charimei^ . . . 800 

« * • • • 
OTHoMAGnus — 0th- 

Magni> • • • . 936 



■■ 



38 



MEMORIA T£CHNICA. 



Eastern. 



A. D. 



• • « • • 
Leo PHilosophus-— 

Leo-Vhetks . . . 886 

* • « • • 

A Lexius C-omnenus 
—Al'Cazka . . 1081 
» * « • « 

M iCHAelPALaeologus 
— Micha-PaWsa . 1261 



WESTERN. 



A. D. 



HENricus QuARtus 
— Hen-quar6z«fp . 1057 
» • * « # 

Frederick iBNobarbus 
—Mnbale . . . 1152 
• » « • « 

FREdericus Seeundus 
— Freftdop . . . 1217 



CoNSTAl^TiNOple taken in the reign of Constan- 
tino Palaeologus the last Emperor of the East — 
Constantinciif/i (see page 11) 1453 

The Memorial Lines. 

EASTERN EMPERORS. 

Valwo, The-M agtotn, Arctoul, Theo-Jiinom, Marco^^ 
lAoloi, Zeuofpo, Anasta/na, — 
Just^A, Justin U^, Phocateze, he-lspap, Ir^npoup, 
Bas-Mace^up, Leo-PheiAs, AUCazka, Micha-Palacf^a. 

WESTERN EMPERORS. 

Valtinitew/, GratotV, Ysl-sikt, Hono^nt, Va-torfo, 

Max-ATi/ii/, Majo/jt), August/bt7, 

Charlmei^, Oth-Magnt>, Hen-quarAzup, Mnbale, Frebdap, 

It was not agreeable with the author's design to give 
a complete table of all the Eastern and Western Em- 
perors. The succession was carried down to the sixth 
century; and after that, only a few are added of such as 
were most remarkable : to which it may not be improper 
to subjoin those persons who were famous for wasting 
and ravaging the Roman Empire. 

Anno Domini. 

ALaRic, King of the Goths, besieges, takes, and 
plunders Rome — Alvobz 410 

ATTila, King of the Huns, called the Scourge of 
God, ravages Italy — Atti/la 451 



mmm 



CHR0N0L06ICA ET HI8TORI0A. 



39 



Anno Domini. 

GENSeric the Vandal sacks Home — Gensful » . 455 

ODoacer,King of the Heruli, makes himself master 
of Italy, and assumes the name of King — Odops 476 

THEOporic, King of the Ostrogoths, drives Odoacer 
from Rome, and kills him with his own sword — 
The6dont 493 

ToTilas the Ostrogoth takes Rome — Toilop . • 547 

The Memorial Line. 
Akobx, Atti/2a, Gens/u/, Odops, Theodoni, Tot/op. 



Place. 

1. Nice 



TABLE XXV. 

EASTERN GENERAL COUNCILS. 

(See page 5.) 
Pope. Emperor. Heretics. 

SiLTCster CoNstantine Arius 
2.Constan- 7 tv ( THEodosi- ) ( MAcedo 

tiuople I Amasus | ^^ Magnus ) ( nians 
3. EpHesus CElestine THEod. jun. NEStorians 431 

C Eutyches 1 
< &D10-I45I 
(, scorus ) 



! 



A. D« 
Year. 

325 

381 



4. Chal- ) T 
cedon \ ^^^ 



MARcian 



^' tinopk"' } V'g"'"« JusTinian 



scorus 
O-rioenists 553 



6.C-onstan- J a ^ xi, 
tinople {Aeatho 



J Constantine^ 5 Mono- 1 ^^^ 



( Pogonatusj \ thelites 3 

The Memorial Lines. 

Nic-Sil-Con-Ari^e/, Co-Da-Th6-Ma*e»&, Eph-Ce-The- 

N6s/6, 
Ch^l-Le-Mar-Eudio/a, Co-Vi-JiistrOk^ G-Ag-Co-Po- 

Mouseiz, 

WESTERN GENERAL COUNCILS. 

1. LATeran 

2. LATeran 

3. LATeran 

4. LATeran 

5. LATeran 



— hoXhSd-in'Oil'dal'lap 



Anno Domini. 

1122 
1139 
1175 
1215 
1517 



5 



MBMORIA T£CHNICA. 

Anno DominL 

i. ilZ ]-h<-«^'-'^ { 1S2 

Vienna— Vitea 1311 

Con STance— Const/of 1414 

BAsil— Bas/a 1431 

FLORENce— Flor^n^n 1439 

TRENt— Trenafo/ 1545 

The Memorial Lines, 

hHibSd^in-oil-dal'lap, hyodiil-doif, YitcM, Constfaf, 
"Bssfia, Fior^n^n, TrenaloL 

N. B. A thousand is to be added. Note also, that 
the second and third Lateran being in the same century 
with the first, b is left out, as bed-in-oil, instead of bed- 
bin-boil; the syllables in order answering to the order of 
the councils. 

COUNCILS NOT (ECUMENICAL. 

A. D. A. D. 

ANtioch — Antob . 341 

SARDica— Sardt/5>' 347 

GANOra — Gaug^oz . 340 LAODicea — La6disa36\ 

The Memorial Line. 
Anc-Neoto/, Gangtoz, An^o6, ha^disa, Sard(/p. 



ANCyra 7— Anc- 1 ^^^ 
Nfiocaesarea } Neoto/ ) 



TABLE XXVI. 

FATHERS, HERETICS, &c. 

Flourished A.D. 

HsRMas PASTor — Herm-Pastau/ ..... 65 

CLEmens RoManus — Ci6-Romatc/ 65 

iGNAtius — Igna62a 101 

PoLYCARp — Polycar42?ei 108 

Justin MARtyr — Jus-Mar6oz 140 

iRenaeus — Irasp 167 

Tueophilus Antiochenus — Thask 168 

ATHeNagoras — Athnapp 177 

CLemens AlExandrinus—Cl-^xane 192 

rERTuUian— Tertawd 192 



CHRONOLOGICA ET HISTORICA. 41 

Flourished A. D. 

MiNutius F-elix — Min-Tdez 220 

ORigen — Oreiz 230 

Gregory THAUMaturgus— Thaume/f . .... 254 

CvpRian martyred — Cy pre/A 268 

LactanUus — Lactan^^^ 303 

ARNobius — Arntyt 303 

Eusebiiis PAMphilius — £u-Pamfa/ 316 

ATHAnasius — Atha^6« 326 

CYRil of J-erusalem — Cyr-Jifo 350 

HiLARy— HilariZ/T 354 

EpiPHANius— Epipbdnwife 368 

EpHraiiD Syrus— Eph-Syr*oiz 370 

BasH MAGnus— Bas-Magfoi« 370 

GREGory NAzianzen— Grego-Naz*oi» .... 370 

Macarius — MviCAript 373 

AMBROse — Amhrotpo • • 374 

JERoMe — Jeromtoik 378 

EvAGrius — £vag/et« 380 

KcFinus — 'RuUnz 390 

A usTin or Augustin — Austtiu 396 

CHRYSOstom — Chryso^cmA 398 

CYRil of ALBxandria — Cyr-Alex^^e . • . . 412 

Philo JudaBus—Phil-Ju/y 40 

JosEPHus — Jos^phaup 67 

AQUila— Aquiftc* 128 

THEODOTion — Tbeod6tqptt 175 

SYMmacHus^~-Syiuche26 201 

• 
HERETICS. 

Cerinthus — Cerinthm SO 

' PAPias — Papao^ HO 

BASiLides— BasiliA^e 112 

VALENTinian — ya,\entady 1^0 

MARCian — Marcftoz 1^*0 

HERMOGenes — Hermogapj^ •...#•• 1*0 

MoNTanus — Montdpe ^'^^ 

Novatian— Novdtta • ^^ 

PauIus SAMosatanus— Pau-Samdaw* . . • • 2O0 

• MANes— Man^^ • ^'^ 



42 MEMORIA TECHNIGA. 

Flourished A.D 

Arius— Antel (see page 6) 325 

DoNAtus — D6nafen . . . • 329 

EuNOMius — Bunomitaux 360 

PRiSClllian— Prisci^pa 371 

Pelagius— Pelagi^zu 405 

WRITERS AGAINST CHRIBTIANITY. 

Celsus — Cehbuz 150 

HiEROCLes — Hierocl^se 202 

PoRPHyry — Porph^y 270 

Zosimus — Zosfel 425 

The Memorial Lines, 

Herm-Pastau/, Cl^-Romau/, Igusltza, Polycar^sei, 
Jus-Mar6os, Irasp, Thcuk, Athuapp, CUixane, Tertand, 
Min-Tdez, Ore*«,Thaume/^, Cyprelk, Lactanfi^^ & Arntyt, 
£u-Pamto/, Aihates, Cyr-Ji/s, Hilari/f, EpiphdnisA, 
£ph-Syr-Bas- Gregotoiz, Macartpf , Ambro^po, Jerom^ot^, 
Evag^m, Rufinz, Austins, Chrysotouk, Cyr-Alex^6e. 

Phil-Jii^, Jos6phaup, Aqui&eAr, Theod6tapu, Symch^is6. 

Ceriutheiz, Papoas;, "BssWibbe, Yslentady, Marcboz, 
Hevmogapy, Montdpe, Pau-Samdauz, Novcftta, Manepp, 
D6na^en, i^nnomitauz, Prisci/pa, Pelagi^^sv. 

Celsbuz, HieroclSze, Porphg^y, ZoafeL 



TABLE XXVII. 

POPES, AUTHORS, FAMOUS MEN, &c. An.Dom. 

LiBERius— Liberffe . 352 

Zosimus — Zosoap 417 

Leo M-agnus — heo-Moff 444 

GelasIus — Geldsone 492 

Joan — JoanAo/* 844 

?™n7vn. } Antipope^Urb-,-Cle.p-««o£p . 1377 

L-eo X. — lu-az-blat 1513 

GREGory XIII. — Grego-6i-^pe 1572 

S-extus QuiNtus — S-QuincUeil 1585 

CLEment VIII. — Cle-k-ahud ...•••• 1592 



GHfiONOLOGlCA £T HISTORICA. 43 

Bef. Christ. - 

SANCUoniathon— Saiicha6ou/ 1193 

HerodoIus — Herodq/te« 456 

Manetho — ManetheJ^3( 280 

Berosus-— Berockou 2G9 

UiPPARchus— Hippar6«6 162 

Atiuo Domini 

Onkelos — Onkelkoi 87 

Tacitus — Ta.cit6zei . 108 

Aulus GelUub — Gelacul 112 

PAUSanias — Pausa/o 134 

GALen— Gal6o^ 143 

Diogenes LaertIus — Laert&op 147 

PRUDentius — Prudinp 397 

EuTROPius — BniTopJek 428 

MERLin — Merlopot . • 477 

HssyCHius — Heschfoun 499 

PROCOpius — Proco/ip • • • 637 

AcATHias— Agath^tfp 667 

GiLDas— Gildi^p 667 

Beds — Bedsaus 666 

Zona R AS — Zonanhbak 1118 

GRATian— Grata6/a 1161 

BALsamon — Belabaub 1191 

Petrus LoMbardus — Itombalk 1168 

THOMas Aguinas— Thom-Aquacigi 1263 

PETRarch— Petrrt«tt . 1336 

Ptol. GEOGRaph. — Ptol-Geogra/a: 140 

Copernicus — Cop6rnica/bt^ 1473 

Tycho Brahe— Tych6fo« 1646 

Galilsbo — Galilasfe 1642 

Erasmus obit — Erasmufs 1636 

Robert STephens obit — Ro-St/un 1669 

TuRNebus — Turn/ate/ 1666 

HENry SxEphens obit— Hen-Ste&i 1663 

Thuanus Historicus — Thuansop 1617 

The Memorial Lines, 

hihertkf Zonoap, Leo-Mo/f, Gclisone, JoBnkof, 
Urh-s-Cle-p-ataip, h-az-blat, S-Quinaleil, Cle-k-abud, 

GregO'bi'b^e. 
Sancha6o«/y Herodofiu, ManetheAy, Hippar6«e, Berodsou. 



44 MBMORIA TEGHNICA. 

Onkelkoi, Gelaad, TeLcitdzei, Fausa^o, Gal^o^, 
Laertdop, Prudinp, £iitro[>/e^, Merlopot, HeschfouUp 
Proco/ip, Ag&ihlavp, Giidusp, 'Bedsaus, Zondimbbak, 
Grdiiabla, BsAaboub, hombalk, Thorn- Aquac^', Petrattn^ 
PtoI-Geogra/«, Tychblos, Gop^raico/ot^, Galila«/i?^ 
JStrasmuts, Ro-St/un, Turnlaul, HenSielsi, Thuaiuop. 

2Vie time when any Author orfammu Man flourished may also be knoum ni 

general^ as follows : 

ViTRUVius in the time of , » , Juiius Gaesar. 

Dionysius HALlcarnassensiSy under AUGustus. 

Strabo TiBerius. 

SiLius iTAiicus Nero. 

Quintus GuRTius Y£SPa«iaii* 

PuJTarch ) rr„ , . 

Appian . } T^Aian. 

ARRian ANToninus P-ius. 

ULPian SEverus. 

PROsper "J 

OROsius V THEodosius junior. 

Z-osimus ) 

JoRNandes ....•••• JusTinian. 

The Memorial Lines, 

Vitruv-Jul, Halic-Aug, Strab-Tib, Sil-IUl- Nero, Cart- 

Vesp> 
Plut-Appi-Tra, Arri-Ant-P, IJlp-Sev, Pros-Oifi-Z- 

Theo, Jorn-Just 



TABLE XXVIII. 

THE FOUNDERS OF THE STATES OF EUROPE. 

Addo Domini. 

Bishop of Rome , St Peter — Pe/> • . . 43 

Pope .... HYGinus — Hyga/b . , 154 

Imperii ORientis . GALerius — Gri-Ga%^ . 303 

Emperor of GoN- \ ARCadius — Gonst-Arc- ^ „^>- 






mperor of GoN- ) ARCadius — Gonst-Arc- \ 
STantinople . . ) toul ) 

TuRKish Emperorl O^^T"'^"''"^*" \ 1295 
'^ I tomadnot . . . • j 

Emperor of the J Julius Gsesar [before 5 .^ 

RoMans . . • j Ghrist] — Rom-Ju/i J 



s 



CHRONOLOGIGA ET HISTORICA. 45 

Anno Domini. 

^reEJpl'e'f^jO'-acer-Ital-Odop. . 476 

Emperor of Ger- 7 CHARLeMagne — Ger- ) ^^^ 
many . , . • 3 Charlmet^ . . . ) 

Ki„gofFK.Kce { ^^^rX".^""-. } ^^ 
Ring of Spain . ATHaulphus — Sp Aihfaz 410 
KingofPoRTugal ALphonsus — PortAIa6in 1139 

King of ENGland Egbert— Engifceifc . . 828 

King of PoLand . BoLeslaus — Pol-BolaM 100* 

King of DENmark Olaus — Den-Ola^jsou . 80& 

^King of SwEden . B-ero — Swe-B;^t6 • . 831 

The Memorial Lines. 

Pe/3f, Hygalo, Ori-GaUy^ Const-Arcfotc/, Turk-Ot- 

iomadnoif 
'Rom-Jufs, Ital-Odop«, Ger-Charlmet^, Fran-Pharam^efj^ 
Sp-Atbyaz,Port'Aia6m,Scot-Ferg^i€f,Poi-Bola^A,EngAeifcy 
Den-Oltiksaup Svre-Bkib, 



TABLE XXIX. 

THE TIMES OF THE WRITING OF THE CANOJ^ICAL BOOKS OF 

THE NEW TESTAMENT. 

An. Dom. 

Titus and )— Ti- )i ^ . 
iTiMothyJ Tim«tt .S 
2 PEter 7 — Sec-Pe \ ^„ 
2TiMothyJ TimiiMp j"^ 
JuDe— Judpa .• . . .71 
REVelations — Reynau . 96 
John, Gospel & Epistles 

— JoTtp 97 

M ATthew— M66orMa^a 4( 
M ARk — Maro^ ... 43 
L-jKe — \jaub .... 61 
Acts— Ac«^ • • • • 63 



An. Dom. 



1 THESsal. \ — Thes- ( 52 

2 Thessal. 5 h-t > 53 
1 PEter— Pe/f ... 54 
GAlatians . , \ — Gd- ") 
l&2Corinth. I Co- >57 
R-omans . .3 Rifp3 
Pmlippians 
CoLossians 
E-phesians 
Pnilemon . 
JAmes • . 
HEBrews — Hebn • . 63 




46 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

The Memorial Lines. 

Thes.fe-*,Pe//;Gd-Co.RMp,Phi-Col-E.Ph-Ja«c,Heb«i, 

Ti-Tim««, 
Sec-Fe-Timaup, Judpn, ReTnau, Jonp, MM, Maro/, 

Lau6, Acst. 



TABLE XXX. 

THE FR07INCIAL AND LEOATINE CONSTITUTIONS, ACCORDING 
TO THE ORDER IN WHICH THET WERE MADE. 

ConstitaUooies Editee A.D. 

STEPHani — Stephecfe 1222 

RiCARdi — Ricarefts . . , 1230 

EoMUNdi— EdmundM 1236 

OTHonis Card. Legati—Othrfi/) 1237 

BoNifacii— Bone^a . . . . 1261 

OTHOBoni Card. Legati — Oi\iohdauk .... 1268 
J. PECcham apud Re A Ding — Pec-Readc?oin . . 1279 
Ejusdem, apud LAMBeth — Pec-LambeAa . . . 1281 

R.WiNCHelsey— Winch/y/ 1.305 

WALter— WaUerf 1322 

SimoQ MEPHam — Si-Meph^e^ 1328 

J. SxRATFOrd — Stratfotofif 1342 

S. ISLEPe— Isieptoud 1362 

S. LANGHam — Langht^p 1367 

S. SuDBUry — Sudbufot^ 1378 

T. ARUNdel — ^Arun^* 1408 

H. CniCHley— Chicb/a/ 1416 

The Memorial Lines, 

Stepheefe, Ricardiz, £dinun(ft«, Othdip, Othobi/auA, 
Bonesa, Pec-ReaddEozn,Wincb^i^/, Pec-Lamb6^a,Wak€d, 
Si-Mepb^e^, Stratfo^oc/, Isleptouc/, Cbicbya/, Krwckfyk^ 
Sudbutoi^, <& Langbisp. 



GEOGRAPHICA. 



SECTION IIL 

THE APPLICATION OF THIS ART TO GEOGRAPHY. 

In the first place are laid down the general divisions of 
Europe, Asia, Africa, and America; then the particular 
divisions of the several states of Europe, into their re- 
spective governments or provinces. For every division 
there is one technical line, composed of the first syllable 
(or sometimes only of the first letters) of the parts or 
places into which it is subdivided; which syllables or 
letters are distinguished from the rest, in the tables, by 
small capitals, or an hyphen following. 

It is further to be observed, that the beginning, middle, 
and ending of the line, answer, in order, to the northern, 
middle, and southern divisions of the kingdoms or coun- 
tries ; so that not only the places themselves, but, in some 
measure, their situation with respect to each other, may 
be remembered at the same time. Thus, in the memorial 
Une for France, as it was before the Revolution, Fraa 
P Nor-I-Cham; Bret-O-BouL; Gul-La-DaP. 

P Nor-I-Cham denotes the four northern governments, 
viz. P-icardy, NoRmandy, I-sle of France, and Cham- 
pagne. 

Bret-O-BouL denotes the four middle governments, viz> 
BRETagne, 0-rleanois, Bourgogne, and L-ionnois. 

Gui-La-DaP denotes the four southern governments 
viz. Guiennewith Gascony« LAoguedoc^ DAuphiny^and 
V rovence. 



48 BfEBfORIA TBCHNICA 

It will be yet some further help to remember the situ- 
ation of places, to observe, that in the several divisions £ 
begin at the toest, and go the eagtward, as far as the limits 
of the country will allow, in a strait line, unless wtiere 
the irregularity of the position makes this method incon- 
venient or impracticable ; where that is the case, the 
reader will supply the defect by his own observation, and 
by comparing h ith proper maps. 

Observe further, that where the syllables are connected 
with an hyphen, the countries denoted by them are con- 
tiguous from west to east; thus, 

Nor-I-Cham shows that the Isle of France joins to 
Normandy on the east, and Champagne to the Isle of 
France on the east. Where the syllables or letters de- 
noting two or more countries are joined together without 
an hyphen, there the countries are contiguous from north 
to south. Thus, Gui-La-DaP shows that Languedoc joins 
to Guienne on the east, Dauphiny and Provence to Lan- 
guedoc on the east ; and also that Provence is contiguous 
to and south of Dauphiny. iSuch syllables as have an 
hyphen preceding, but are not by it immediately joined 
to the foregoing syllable, signify that the countries denoted 
by them lie eastward, but are not contiguous. Thus, 
Sp -It -1'urk shows that Italy is east of Spain, and Turkey 
east of Italy, but not contiguous. 

When the reader is become well acquainted with the 
general ditnnons, he may then go on to charge his memory 
with the chief cities and most remarkable places of every 
country, their longitude and latitude, the correspondence 
of ancient and present geography, the geography of the 
Old and New Testament, the proportions of the states of 
Europe to Great Britain, the situation of the most noted 
islands, with other instructive and entertaining particulars 
in geography; all which he will find himself able to remem- 
ber with greater ease than he could possibly have supposed 
before he became acquainted with the memorial lines con- 
trived for that purpose. 



GEOGRAPHIC A. 4U 



TABLE I. 

THE OSNEBAL DIVISIONS OF EUROPS9 ASIA, AFRICA^ AND 

AMERICA. 

I. EUROPE is divided into, 

1. Northern — cootainiog Norway, S-wedeo, Russia, 
D-enmark. 

2. Middle — comprising the Nfitherlands, GErmany, 
Poland, L-ittle T-artary, Erancc, Swrrzerland, HuN- 
gaiy, TRANsiivania, Moldavia, WAlachia. 

3. Southern — consisting of Spain with Portugal, iTaly, 
TuRKey. 

The Memorial Line, 

£UR=No-S-Ru D; N6-Ge-Po-LT,Fran-Switz,H\in- 
Tran-Mo-Wa; Sp -It -Turk. 

II. ASIA is divided into, 

1. Northern— containing Great TArtary, GEorgia. 

2. Middle — including TuRkey in Asia, PErsia, Em- 
pire of the Mogul, CHiNa. 

3. Southem—^ompTehending ARABia, East iNDies. 

The Memorial Line. 
AS=Ta-Geo; Tur-P6- Mo-Chin; Arab^Ind. 



III. AFRICA is divided into, 

1. Northern — containing BArbary, BiLdulgerid, E»gypt. 

2. Middle — subdivided into Z Aara, N EgToland, G u inea. 
N-ubia. 

3. Southern — consisting of CoNgo, ABYSsinia, coast 
of Abex, coast of CAFraria, MoNomotapa, ZANGuebar, 
coast of AJan. 

The Memorial Line, 

AFsB&Bil-E; ZdNeGui-N; Con- Abyss- Abex, Caf- 
Mono-Zangu- Aj . 



50 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

IV. AMERICA is divided into, 

1. N'Orthem — containiog New WALes, New BRiTain, 
Louisiana, CANada, Mexico, FLORida, CARolina, Vir- 
ginia, M-aryland, P-ennsilvania, NewYoRk, NewJ-ersey, 
New ENGland, lying from south-west to north-east. 

2. S-outhem — including Terra FiRMa, Peru, country 
of the AMAZonSy BRAzil, CHili, PARaguay, Terra Ma- 
oellanica. 

The Memorial Lines, 

N-AM =s Wal-Brit, L6uis-Can, Mex-Flor, C^-Vi-M, 
P-YorJ Eng. 

1-AM=Firm, Per-Am^ Bra, Chi-Par, Mag. 



TABLE II. 

THE PARTICULAR DIVISIONS OF NORTHERN EUROPE. 

I. NORWAY is divided into five parts or governments, viz. 

WARDhuys (including F-inmark and Norwegian Lap^ 
land), DROntheim, BERgen, AnsIo. 

II. SWEDEN was divided into four general parts, viz. 
Swedish LApland (with B-othnia intermingled), Swe- 
den P-roper, Fin land (lately seized by Russia), and 
GoTHland. 

III. DENMARK contains 

The peninsula of JuTland, ZsAland, and the lesser isles. 

IV. RUSSIA contains many provinces, the most con- 
siderable of which are, 

Northern — LAPland, Dwina or Archangel. 

Middle — Finland, Esxhonia, Livonia, iNCria, Nov- 
gorod. Moscow. 

Western — LiTHuania, PoLotsk, Mohilev, UKRaine, 
BBLgorod. 

Smithem — BuDziakTartary, Crim Tartary or Taurida, 
VoRonez, Don R-ozacks. 



6E06RAPHICA. 51 

The Memorial Lines for Northern Europe. 

NOR=:s Ward (F-Lap), DroBerAns. S WED±=Ld (B), 

SweP-Fin Goth. 

DENzrJut-Zea. 

BUSS=Lap-Dwi; FiaEst Liv, Ing-Nov-Moac; Lith- 

Pol-Mo-Ukr-Bel; Bud-Crim^Vor-DonK. 



TABLE III. 

THE PARTICULAR DIVISIONS OF MIDDLE EUROPE* 

I. The NETHERLANDS, or Low Countries, here- 
tofore were generally distinguished into the United or 
Dutch Netherlands lying to the north, frequently called 
Holland, and the former Spanish Netherlands to the south, 
often called Flanders, from the most remarkable province 
in each. 

The United Netherlands, now incorporated with France, 
formerly were divided into seven provinces, viz. FRiEsland, 
GRoningen, Overyssel, H-ollaud^ U-trecht, GuElderland 
with Zutphen, Z-ealand. 

The Spanish Netherlands, now swallowed up by France, 
were usually divided into these ten provinces, viz. Fl An- 
ders, B-rabant, (MARquisate of the empire within Brabant, 
Seignory of M Alines within Brabant,) partof G-uelderland, 
LiMburg, ArtoIs, HAinault^ NAmur, LuxEMburg. 

The Memorial Line* 

HOLL=Fries.GrOv, H-U-Gue-Zu Z; Fla-B (Mar- 
Ma), GLim Art-Hal Na-Luxenu 

II. GERMANY was divided into nine circles: 

Three northern — circle of WEstphalia, circle of lowei- 
SAi^ony, circle of upper Saxony. 

Three middle — circle of lower Kmne, circle of upper 
Rhine, circle of FRANconia. 

Three southern — circle of SuAbia, circle of BAVaria, 
circle of Austria. 

d2 



irfEMORIA. TECHNIGA. 

To which may be added, the kingdom of BOHEMIA , 
distinguished into four general parts, viz. LvsAtia, Silesia, 
Bohemia P- roper, MoRavia, 

The Memorial Lines, 

GER.M=We-Sa/-ttp; Rhi/-tt-Fran; Sua-Bav-Aus, 
BOHE=Lusa-Si-BoP-Mor. 

III. POLAND was divided into two general parts; 
the duchy of Lithuania, and the kingdom of Poland, pro- 
perly so called. 

Lithuania, consisting of the duchy of Courland, Sa- 
mogitia, LiTHuania Proper. 

The kingdom of Poland contained PRUssia, PoLACHia, 
MAzovia, PoLand magna, Poland /larva. Little Russia, 
VoLHinia, PoDOiia. 

The Memorial Line, 

POL=:CouSa-Lith, Pru-Polach, Maz, Polma-jva, Rus- 
VolhiPodol. 

IV. FRANCE was divided into twelve governments, 
now, including the conquered countries, into about 120 
departments : 

Four northern — ^P-icardy, NoRmandy, I-sle of France, 
CHAMpagne. 

Four middle — BRBTagne, 0-rleannois, Bourgogne, 
L-ionnois. 

Four iouthem — Guienne with Gascony, LAnguedoc, 
DAuphiny, P-rovence. 

To which may be added, the other countries compre- 
hended within the compass of Old Gaul, viz. 

LORrain, east of Champagne. 

S AVoy, east of Bourgogne, or burgundy, and Dauphiny. 

Switzerland, east of Franch^ C-omptl. 

Franch6 Compt6, east of f -urgundy. 

The Memorial Lines, 
FRA=PNor-I'Cham; Br6t-0-BouL; Gui-La-DaP. 
LorC%, Sav^wDa, SwiC, CoB, 



■ « ■ 



OBOORAPHICA. 58 

TABLE IV. 

THE PARTICULAR DIVISIONS OF SOUTHERN EUROPE. 

L SPAIN (excluding Portugal) may be divided iuto 

two general parts : 

Northern — containing eight provinces, viz. GALlicia, 
A-sturia, Biscay, N-avarre, ARAgon, CATalonia, Leou, 
Old (vetus) CAStile. 

Southern— contajning five provinces, viz. New (nova) 
CAStile, VALencia, ANDalusia, MuRcia, G-ranada, 

The Memorial Line. 

SPAziGdl-A-Bisc-N-Ara-Cat, Le-Cast?c«; Casno-Val, 
And-MurG. 

II. ITALY might formerly be distinguished into 

Northern, or LoMbardy — containing Piedmont, MoNT- 
serrat, MiLan, G-enoa, VENice, MANtua, PArma, Mi- 
randola, MoDena. 

Southern — Lucca, Tuscany or Etruria, the PAPacy 
or States of the Church, NAPles. 

The Memorial Line. 

XTziLom (=Pi-Mont-MilO, VenManPa-Mi-M6d), Lu- 
Tu, Pap-Nap. 

III. TURKEY in EUROPE may be distinguished into 

Northern — containing BESsarabia,CRoatia, D-almatia, 
Bosnia, SErvia, BuLcaria. 

Southern — containing ALBania, MACedonia, RoMania, 
CniMaera, jAnna, LiVADia, MoRea. 

The Memorial Line. 

TURK as Bess, CroD-B6-Se-Bulg ; Alb-Mac-Rom, 
Ghim-Ja, LivadMor. 



54 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

The Memorial Lines for all Europe. 

NOR==Ward (F-Lap), DroBerAns. SWED=:Ld(B), 

8weP-FiD Goth. 

D£N=iJut-Zea. 

RUSS=:Lap.Dwi; FinEst Liv, Ing-Nov-Mosc; Lith- 

Pol-Mo-Ukr-Bel; Bud-Crim-VoT-DonK. 
HOLL==Fries-GrOv, H-U-Gue-ZuZ; Fla-B (Mar- 

Ma), GLim Art-Hai-Na-Luxem. 
G£RM=:We-Sa/-«p; Rfai/K-Fran; Sua-Bav-Aus. 
BOHE=Lusa-Si-BoP-Mor. 
POL=CouSa-Lith, Pru-Polach, Maz, Volma-pa, Rus- 

VolhiPodol. 
FRA=P Nor-I-Cham; Br^t-O-BouL; Gui-La-DaP. 

LorCh, SsLvBuDa, SwiC, CoB. 
SPA=Gdl-A.Bisc-N-Ara-Cat, lA-Ctiavet: Casno-Val, 

And-MurG. 
IT=Loin (=Pi-Mont-MilG,VenManPa.Mi-M6d), Lu- 

Tu, Pap- Nap. 
TURK » Bess, CroD-B6*Se-Balg ; Alb-Mac-Rom, 

Chim- Ja^' LdvadMor. 



TABLE V. 

ENGLAND, WALBS, IRELAND, AMD SCOTLAND. 

L ENGLAND may be divided into three general parts, 
northern, middle^ and southern: which altogether con- 
tain forty counties or shires. 

The nortketn part of England contains six counties or 
shires : 



On the west coast, from north to south, 

CuMberland 
WEstmoreland 
LAncashire 
[Cum-WeLa] 



On the east eoast,/rom north to south. 

No Rthumberland 
DuRham 
YoRkshire 
[NorDurYor] 



The middle part of England contains twenty-tour coun- 
ties or shires : 



GB06RAPHICA. 



55 



On <Ae west 9 jomhtg to Wales from 
north to south, 

CHEshire . ) 

Silropshire ) . • • . 

HErefordshire .... 



On the east coast, from north to 
souths 

Lincolnshire 



C N-orfolk 

JS-uffolk 

MoNJBouthshire . . ; . • Essex 

[Che$hHeMon] [Li NSEss] 



Between Linccinsh. E, t^ 
Vheshire tf Shropshire W. 

Dsrbyshire *) 
Netting- I N. 

hamsbire 3 
STApfordshire 
LBicestershire 
R'^utlandshire 

tOe-No-Staf- 
Lei-R] 



BetweenNorfoUcIf Suffolk 
E, ondHer^ardshtre W, 

WoRcestershire 

WArwickshire 

N'ortbamptonshire 

B-edfordshire 

Huntingdonshire 

C-ambridgeshire 

[Wor-Wd-No- 
B-Hun-C] 



Between Essex K and 
Monmouthshire W, 

GLoucestershire 

O-xfordshire 

Buckinghamshire 

HERtfordshire 

M-iddlesex 

[Gl-O-Buc- 
HerM] ^ 



The iouthem part of England contains ten counties or 
shires : 



Between the Channel 9^ the Severn sea. 

CoRNwall 
DBVonshire 
Somersetshire 
Dorsetshire 




Between the Channel and the Thames, 
WiLTshire 



BERkshire 
HAmpshire 
SuRrey 
S-ussex 

KENt 



— Wilt- 
BerHa- 

SurS-Ken 



The Memorial Lines. 

E=Cum-WeLa, NorDurYor,CheShHeMon, Li NSEss, 

De-No Staf.Lei-R, 
Wor-Wd-No-B-Hun-C, Gl-0-Buc-HerM, Corn-D6v- 

SoDo, Wilt-BerHa-SurS-Ken. 

The diriston of England according to the Circuits: 



WE8TEEN. 

Cor-D6.Dor-Hara» Som- 
Wilt. 



OXFORD. 

Ber.O.Glo6ce-Mon, W6r. 
cest- U ere- Shrop- S taff . 



60 MBMORIA TBGHNICA. 



HOME. 

Hert-Ess-Ken-Sur-Sus. 

NORFOLK. 

N6rf-Su-Cam, HuD-B^d- 
Buck. 



MIDLAND. 

North- Rut- Lioc, Derby- 
No-Leice-War. 

NORTHERN. 

Yor-Dur-Nor, Lduca-We- 
Cumber. 



II. WALES is divided into two general parts: 

North Wales— coDtaining ANolesey, CAerDarvooshire, 
DEnbighshire, FLintshire, M£Rionethshire> MoNTgo- 
meryshire. 

South Wales — containing CARDiganshire, RADNor- 
shire, PEMbrokeshire, CArmarthenshire, BREcknock« 
shire, GLAMorganshire. 

The Memorial Line. 

W=Ang-C6-De-Fli-Cfe, Meri-Mont-iS& ; Card-Radn- 
JJere, Pem-Ca-BreG lam- Mon. 

N, B, The italic letters denote the adjoining counties 
of England : as Ch Cheshire, adjoining to Flintshire ; ^ 
Sh iSiAropshire, adjoining to Montgomeryshire; Here 
Herefordshire; Mon iUicmmouthshire. 

III. SCOTLAND is divided into two general parts: 

North Scotland, or Highlands, beyond the river Tay — 
containing thirteen counties, among which are Strath- 
navern, Caithucss, SuTHerland, Ross, LoCHabar, 
MuRray, BRAidalbin, P-erth, 

South Scotland, on this side the Tay — containing twenty 
counties, some of which are ARGyle, Fife, Lothian, 
A I Re, GAiioway. 

The Memorial Line. 

SCOT=Strath-Caith, SiithRoss, Loch -Mur, BraiP ; 
Arg -Fi, Lo-Air, Gal. 

IV. IRELAND is divided into four larger parts or 

provinces : 

UliSTer to the north 
MuNSTer to the south 



LEiNster to the east 
CoNnaught to the west 



The Memorial Line, 
IRELssUlst, L6in-Con, Munsu 



GEOGRAPHICA. 



67 



TABLE VL 

CHIEF CITIES AND REMARKABLB PLACES* 



A Miens eh. town in Picardy 
P-aris in the lile of France 
Rouen in iVbrmandy 
TROYes ) . r^w 
RHEims } >•> CrA««P«Jn>« 

RENnes in Bretagae 
PoiCTiers in Or/eannois 



IN ANCIENT F&ANCE. 

BouRDeaux in Gutenne 

THOulouse in Zan^jfuedoc 

GRENoble in Daiephiny 

Dijon in f ur^undy 

Aix 

MARseilles S-in Provence 

O Range 



] 



The Memorial Lines, 

AmPica, 'PIsle, 'ELouNor, Troj-'RheiCham, 'R€nBreta^ 

PoictOi/, 
BourdGut, ThouLang, GrenDau, Dij6n^«r^, Aix^^Mar 

& OrPror. 



MiDdleburg in Zealand 
De venter in OverysseX 
LEUWARden in Pne^land 
BrusscIs in ^ra^ant 
Brugcs in Panders 
CHARLeroy in Namur 



IN THB NETHERLANDS. 

DuNKirk 



> in Flanders 
( in HainAuli 



DouAy 

MoNs 

Cam Bray 5 

Loo in Crue/derland 

An Twerp in Brab&ni 



The Memorial Lines, 

MidZea,Dey Overyssjjeuwit Fries, BrfisBrafta^BrugPAin, 
CharliVam, Dunk-p6uaP^n<f, Mon-CambJJatJiy LooGuel 
& AniBrab, 

IN GERMANY. 



HAMBurg) cb. towns in 
HANOTer 3 L-ow. ^Saxony 
WiTtenberg in Up. ;S>axony 
HEldelburg ) in Lower 
CoLogne i Rhine 
MuNich in Pavaria 
AuGsburg in Sualnvk 



JPRANcfoit in Upper PAine 
NuRemburg in Pranconia 
MuNSterin TTes^halia 

CLEves in Westphalia 
ViENNa in Ai»<ria 
9 



S8 



MBMORIA TEGHNICA. 



The Memorial Lines. 

Hamb-Hano^Sdl, WitS'up, Hei-CoH^tlo, MunBavar, 

AugSuab, 
Franc/2^up, NurF, MwasWe$t, Stras/2Aup, Cl^yWestpha^ 

YieunAnst. 

m SPAIN. 



BiLboa in Biscay 
CoMPOStella in GaRiciB, 
Ssville in Andalusia, 
BARcelona in Catalonia. 
Oviedo in Asturia, 



PAMPBLuna in Navaxre 

» 

S k RACossa in A f ragon 
Burgos in Castle vetus 
MADrid in Castile nova 
ToRTosa in Catalonia 



The Memorial Lines, 

3i\Bis, ComposCaZ, SerAndal, BaxCatal, OvAst, 
PampeliVai;, Saragilr, "BurgCas-vetf Mad Ca-no, TortCs^ 



IN TURKEY IN EUROPE. 



SoPHiach. town in Bulgaria, 
BELGrade in Servui 
Sera 10 in Bosnia 
SPALatro in Dalmatia 
SALONichi in Afacedonia 
CARLStat in Craatia 



TERGOvisk in Walackia, 
HKRMan- ) in Transyl- 

stadt 5 vania 
CHOCZim in iRfoldavia 
CoNSTanti- J . 

nople 3 



in jRomanki 



The Memorial Lines, 

^oph Buly BelgSert7i\ SeTa,iBos, SpalDa, Salon^ac, 
CarlsCrOy Ter%6Walach, HermTransyl^ ChocziMo, Coh- 
stjRom. 



TABLE VII. 

REMARKABLE PLACES (sPARSIM) IN EUROPE. 



FoNTARAbiain Biscay 
RATisbon in Bavaria 
PADua in Venice 
NiMeguen in Guelderi^nd 
OLiva in Prussia, 
CoNSTance in SucUnA 
Aix-la-Gha- )inlfes/- 
pelle ) phalia 

MoNTPElier {'"dS"^"*" 



CASsel in Upper jRAine 
ARCHangel in Dwina, 
EiocHstet } ' jy 

BLENHEim }>»««•«'>» 

St. Omers in ArtoHs 
VERDen ) . T ^ cf 

MAGDeburg in Lo. Saxohj 
CALais in Pic&rdy 
BADen in ^a6ia 



GEOGRAPHICA. 



SO 



BBNeVENto in Naples 
BRBDa in Bra6aat 
CadIz ill Andalusia, 
AciNCourt in Artois 
MiTtaw in Cauriand 
MALAga in Granada 
Trists m L-ower Rhine 
MABSTrich in Limbwrg 

Havre- J • a? a 
De-Grace } '" ^"^a-^y 

VALEDOiid in Old Castile 
ToLedo in A'eto Castile 
Meaux in C&ampa^e 
Soissons in hie of France 
AviGDon in Provence 
NASsaw in Upper Rhine 
CiTADBLla in J/tnorca 
CAGliari in ^Sardinia 
PALERmo in SiciXy 
SLBSiwck in Jtedand 
BASTia in CorsicsL 
Cracow in Po/and P-arva 
WARSaw in Mazovia. 
BfiRGEn in JVorway 
Copenhagen in Zea/and 
NisMes in Languedoc 
CuRisTiana in il^^erhuys 
Turin in Fiedmont 
Riga in Zivonia 
RoCHeile in Or/eannois 
Gottenburg in Gothland 
LuNDen in Seanen 
CRESSy in Ptcardy 
SALAMANCa in Xeon 
Zell in Lower iSaxony 
Cham berry in Savoy 
Dantzic in Po/and 

STOCKholm \ "^ ^"'^^^^ 
( P-roper 

PRBSburg in Up. Hungary 



CoRDova in Andalusia 
CARThagena in Jfiircia 
Ur,«« S in FrancM 

Liege in TFe«fphalia 
CREMona in Milan 

i in the Pfinia* 
BATCHberai< sula of Little 

t Tartary 
NANcy in Xorrain 
LBGborn ) . ^^ 
f LORence \ '" ^^««^"y 
GfiNeva in ^S^u^Vi^erland 
Lisbon in Portugal 
RAGusa in Da/matia 
BREslaw in SilesisL 
PRAGue in Bohemia 
SxExin in Pomerardu 
PERPignan in iRoie«illoa 
TRENt in Tyrol 
STRASBurg in Ahace 
PoLa in Istria, 
Posega ^ 
PeterwA- vin Sclavonia, 

RAdin 3 
BERLin in Brandenburg 
DREsdea 7 . « 

LEiPsic { '"^ ^^"y 

RAvenna in JRomagna 
LoRETTo in ilncona 



RousilloB 5P*rtofO<.te- 

( AMua 
ScLATonia of Hungaiy 
Tyrol of Austria. 
PoMerania ^ f ^ 

and ( of the late Fenetian 
IsTria ( territories 



(90 MKMORIA TBCHNIGA. 



CAPitaiiate part of i^!iple» 



{part of the 
Papacy or 
states of the 
Church 
LlMOsin part of Chiienne 

The Memorial Lines* 

FontaraBuc, RatijBao, Pad Fen, 'SimOaSlder, OlivPrtt*, 
ConstiS>tfa6, Ain-lsL-ChaWest, MontpelXan^, Cassi^Aup 

& Archl>tcm, 
Hoch-BlenheBav, Omeri^r^, VerdBremSalo^ MagdSs- 

lo, CalPic, 
R&dSuab, BenyenNap, BredBrab, Csd Andal, AgincArt, . 
MiiCauriand, Mal&Gran, TrieRkil, MaestLim^ttr, Ha- 

vredjVorm, 
Valedol 00, TolNewC, MeauxCAam, Soiss/«/e &Ayi^Prov, 
NassjRAup, CitadelMtn, CagSard, PalcrjSi'ci, Sles«/t<^, 
BasiCarsic, CracoPo/p, WhtsMozov, BevgeNo, CopZeal 
^ismJjangued,Chr]aiAgg,TunnPied, RigaZi, RochO»7^ 
GoG, hundScon, CiessPic, SalamancXe, Zell&lo, 

ChamSav, 
Dantzlc Po/, StockiS»wep, Pr^s-upHun^, CordAndalu 

CartMiur, 
Bes Fran- Com, Liege IFe^, CremMil, Batch 7brto-pe, 

NanXor, 
Leg-FlorTtMc, GenSwitz, lAsP, RagDa/, Bres;Si^, 

PragBo, 
SietPomeran, PerpjRoiw, TrenTyr, Strasbi^^sa, Pollstri, 
PoS'W arsiSclaVf Berl^ran, Dtes-LeipSax, RaviRo, Lo- 

rett.^^nc, 
BoQsCatalon, Sc\a,yHung,Tjro\Aust, Pom- Brand-Sa5up, 

1st Ven, 
Anc-RomPop, lAmoGuienn, Ben-AnjOrl, Holst&lo, 

CapiVop. 

TABLE VIIL 

SOMB CHIEF CITIES AND EEMARKABLE PLACES IN ASIA, 

AFRICA, AND AMERICA. 



PEKin capital of China. 
AoRa in India 



CHAMBalu in Tartary 
Ispalian in Persia 



n r y i 



GEOGRAPHICA* 



61 



-. (in SavvL 

PoRTro8eway| ^^^j^ 

AsTRAchan in Tar^ary 
Nicosia in Cyprus 

SMYRna in NatoliVL 
Azov in Circassia 



parts of 
Turkey 
in Asia 



ALEPpo capital of SyridL 
Cairo in ^ecypt 
Fe2 in Barbixy 
DAAra in BUdulgBxvdi 
ToMBute in iVe^roland 

MoKOMotopa{--£JX 
Dan cola in iVu^ia 
Ch Axumo in JSitAiopia Inf. 
S. Fe in Granada 
S. SALVador in Brazil 
S. Jago in Chili 
Assumption in Paraguay 
QuEBec in Canada 

PH^x^elphia { \l^'- 

Jamgs Town in Fir^inia 

BALTimore in Jlfaryland JALADulia 

The Memorial Lines, 

PiikChin, Agr/mf yChamb Tart, Isp Pers, Alepi%ri,Cair£^, 
Fez Barb, Ddi2LBildul,TomhNeg, Monom^JSltAsupe, Dang- 

Nub, 
ChaxJS'Minf, F^Crran, Salv^rax, J9^6Chili, Ass Par, 
QuehCaTiadd, PhilPennSy Jam Virffin^ BaltMary, Port- 

No-Sc, 
Astrac Tar^, Nico Cyp, Mous-BagDia, SmyriVa^, Azov- 

Circ, 

Nat-Syr i-Di-Turc Twr, MingGeorg, Car- Amis-Nat- AIM- 
Nat. 



NATolia 

SYRia 

Diarbec 

TuRComania 

MiNGrelia of Gfeor^ia 

CARamania ^ of iVa^olia 



TABLE IX. 

LA TITUBE AND LONGITUDE OF THE MOST HEMARKABLE PLACES. 

To the beginning of the name of the place is added a 
tec hnical ending, consisting of three or four letters, the 
tw o first whereof denote the latitude, the other the longi- 
tu (ie: thus, 

Stock/o«-aA, i« e, STOCKholm in the 59th degree of 



(32 MEMORIA TEGHNICA. 

latitude, and 18th of longitude ; km standing for 59, ac- 
cording to the general key, and ak for 18. But this is 
not the exact longitude and latitude of the place, because 
no minutes are taken notice of, which would perhaps be 
a nicety not worth remembering : but that the latitude is 
between 59 and 60, and the longitude between 18 and 19.* 
And it is farther to be observed, that if of the two letters 
which signify the longitude and latitude, the fiist is a 
consonant, as in Am, in that case, though the longitude, 
&c. is between 59 and 60, yet it. is nearer to 60 than it is 
to 59, and consequently 59 degrees 30 minutes at least, 
if not more. If the first letter is a vowel^ as in ak, though 
it is between IB and 19, yet it is nearer to the lesser 
number, and consequently 18 degrees and under a half; 
as the true longitude of Stockholm is 18 degrees 22 min., 
the true latitude 59 degrees ;i0 minutes 

Lat LoD. 

fBfiRgen — Bersy-l 60 5 

SrocKholm — Stocklou-ak 59 18 

Moscow — Moslu'tei 55 38 

Copenhagen — Coplu-be 55 12 

PARis—Par/fe-c 48 2 

Cracow — Cmcuz-ez 50 20 

Vienna — Viok-ap 48 17 

MADRid — M?idroy't 40 3 

RoMe— Rom/^-6e 41 12 

CoNstantinople — Cono6-to 41 31 

PRAGue — Prag/y-6o 50 14 

DANTzic— Dantztt/-6«t 54 18 

Bash,— Basil/bi-p 47 7 

BRUSsels — Brus/y-o 50 4 

j-GiBraltar— Gibtett-« 36 6 

f SMyrnacr-SmtTs-cftm 38 29 

TRoy— Troy-c» 40 29 

fjBRUsalem — Jexuta-ts 31 36 

* This accuracy hath not been altogiUher observed in those 
places which have this mark (i) placed before them ; the assign- 
ing to them their respective degrees of longitude and latitude 
being intended only to enable tlie learner to remember in what 
part of the globe they are situated. 



GBOGRAPHlCA« 63 

Lat. Loa. 

A LEPpo^-Alepls-^ei 36 38 

RHodes — "Rhotoi'te 37 32 

fBABylon— Babi*/o 33 44 

AtH€ds — Aihik-ef ....>••..• 38 25 

iDa— Idi/-rfoi 36 27 

WARSaw — Wsisud-eb 62 21 

ALExandria — Alexib-if 31 34 

S. HELens — Hel^-jp 16 7 

Lisbon — Listei'bz 38 10 

NAPXies — Naplo6-6» ......... 41 15 

MESsina*-MessiA-6au 38 16 

fCAHTHage— Carthfi-6y 33 10 

NANcy — Nan/ct-« 48 6 

fispahan — Ispte-on 32 49 

AGRSL—A^ik'Oit 28 73 

SiAM — Siama/-^a . • • . 14 100 

-j-JAPan — Ja.pto-bay • • . 34 110 

•FoRMosa — "Formdi-g 23 100 

"AsTRachah — Asivop-lau 47 66 

pEKlS^Vekinoz'bap 40 117 

+Fort St GEorge— Geo*i-«(m 13 69 

jSpiTsbergen — Spitm'-soii 73 69 

ARCHangei — Archso-fe 64 42 

BENGal — Bengdd-out 21 96 

VENicer— Ven^-flrf 46 12 

CaiAo— CairdoM-t7 29 36 

LeipsIc — heipsub-ad, ........ 61 12 

+HECla— Hec5/-a* 65 13 

"NlNeveh — Winto-fe 34 42 

••Porto BELlo—Bel6/^-itM 11 86 

• -Porto Rico— Rice2f-/oM 20 69 

••BsRMudas — "Bermta-lau ....... 31 59 

••J-amaica — Jak-ky 18 80 

• -TERCERa chief of the Azores I. — Tercerfp-c/ 37 25 

• -MADeira Isles— Madi7-e(£ ....... 33 22 

"BARbadoes — Bar6u-/a 15 51 

1 ?ERRO one of the Canary Isles— FerrcA:-a^ . 28 18 

"j-Quebec — Qaop-pu 47 75 

N* B» The first meridiaii is fixed at Londoiu 



31 


— 





47 


— 17 


36W 


46 


— 1 


16W 


61 


— 12 


29£ 



64 MBMORIA TBCHNICA. 

It may be convenient to remember the exact longitude 
and latitude of some particular places; as, 

Lat Dcgr* Min* Lon. Deg. Min. 

LoNdon— -^n^a, ib, • . . 61 

FerRo Isl. — Ferr^p, op-dp, il 27 

Oxford— OxW,/«-6, al . . bl 

RoMe — K6m/a, lo-bS, dou . 41 

The Memorial Lines. 

Bersy-l, StockUm-ak, Moslu-tei, Coplu-be, 'Parfk-e, 
Crac^z-e?, Viok-ap, Madroy-^ Rom/2-^, Cono6-<a, 
Vngly-bo) Dantztef-6et, Bdsil/ot-p, Dmsly-o, Gibtau-s, 
Smik-dou, Troy-en, Jeruta-ts, Alepb-^ei, Rho^oi-#e^ 

3fihit'fo, 
Athik-el, Idil-doi, Wars^c^eft, Alexifr-t/*, HeI6ie-p, 
histei'bz Naplo6-^tt, Messik-bau, i^atthti-by, 'Nanfei-s, 
Japte-on, Agr^k-oit, Siwnaf-ga, JsL'pto-bay, Formc/t-^r, 
Astrop-^te, Pekinoz-6ap, GeobUiou, Spitpi-sotf, Archs^-^e, 
Bengdd'oul, Yenji-ad, Cairdou-il, Leipsu6-ac?, Hec«/-a/^ 
SintO'fe, Belbd-ku, ^iciz-hu, 'Bermta-lou, Jak-ky, 
Tetcetip-el, MnAit-ed, FerreA-aA, Bar6tt-ia, Quup-pu, 

L6nla, ib; Ferr^, op-ap^ il; 0x16, fs-b, al; R6m/a, /o- 
bi, dou. 



TABLE X. 

DISTANCE OF CHIEF CITIES, &e. FROM LONDON, IN ENGLISH 

MILES. 

To the beginning of the name of the place there are 
two or three letters added, which are to be supplied with 
a cypher at the end ; it being thought sufficient to give a 
round number, instead of being too exact, especially in a 
matter wherein the best geographers themselves are not 
agreed: as, 

Madreu ^MADRid distant from London 86,sc. 860 
miles. Copenhagen — Copsa, distant about 61, sc. 610. 
GsNEVa — Genevos, distant 46, sc, 460 miles; and so of 
the rest, only PARis — 'Ptadp-l, 2*25. 



GBOOBAPHICA. 



65 



Note^ That the compntations are made at the rate of 
69| statute miles to a degree, which is nearest the truth, 
and are therefore about one part in seven more than in 
Mr. Templeman's tables, who computes by geometrical 



miles of 60 to a desrree. 



PakIs — Vwdel 

Rome — ^Roul . . . 950 

MADRid— Madn?i« . 860 

ViENna— Vienife^ . \ 820 

Copenhagen — ^Cop^a 610 

GsNEva — Genevo^ . 460 

Moscow — Mosco^x . 1660 



DISTANCB8 FROM LONDON. 
Eng. Miles. 

. . 225 



Eng. 111108. 

Pnague — Praw^ . . 650 
GiBitaltar—Gibra&x • 1160 



WAHsaw — W arsnu 
STOckholm — Stotfp 
Dantzic — Dantzi% 
CoNSTantinople— 
Constat • • . 



DItTANCm FROM JBRU8ALSM. 



BabjIou — Babo^y . 480 
NAzareth — Naz% . 80 
SAMaria — Samo^. • 45 



DAMascus — Dam- 
bva . . . . 

ANTioch — Ant^ 



From Dan to BBEBsheba — Dan-a-B^er^z 



950 
970 
800 

1600 



150 
dOO 
240 



The Memorial Lines, 

Fordel, lUmZ, Madron, VienA^, Copxa, Genevo^, 
Moscow, Traul, Qihrabs, Warsnu, SUmp, Dantzi^, 

Consto^. 
Babo%,^z%,Samo/,Dam&t^,Ant^, — Dan-a-B6erdtw. 



TABLE XI. 

THE PEOPOETION OV THE COUNTRIES OP EUROPE TO GREAT 
BRITAIN, THAT IILANI> BEING THE UNIT. 

Russia— Buss- I PoLand— PoU,tn 

az,ln .... 10,13 TuRkey— Turf,aA 



GERMany — Germ- 

tftit .... 3 ,53 
Sweden — Swi,M • 3 ,66 



Spain — Spa,^ . 
Faance — Fra,p . 
•Iraly — Itb^an . 



With Sicily, Comca, and Sardinia. 



3,39 
3,18 
1,81 

1 ,7 
1,19 



06 MEMOSIA TBGHNICA* 



*DBNMArk — D^n- 
ma^fOn .... 1 ,40 

SpanI^ N-ether- 

landsf — Span-N,aA ,18 



UNited PROTincesf 

--Un-Pr,ad • . ,11 
SwiTZEKlandt — 

Switzer,6o« • • ,17 
Britain .•..«! ,00 



The Memorial Linee. 

Ru«a;r,6t, Germ^u^, Swt,s«, PoU,tn, Tra,p, Spa,ka^ 

TuTt,ak, 
Por,r«, iSipan-Nja^, Uii-Pr,a6, Switzer,6oi, DeDina6,<m, 

1th fOn, 

EXPLANATION. 

Germt^ni — GERMany is to Great Britain as 3 ,53 to 
1, t. e. three times as big and a little above half as big. 
UNited PRovinoes — Un-Pr,a6, as ,11, or very little above 
a tenth part; and so of the rest. 

Note, That a degree is esteemed equal to 60 Gbomb* 
tricaLmiles, 69J English statute miles, 15 GERman miles, 
2& common FRench leagues, 480 Greek STAoia, 16 Pbr- 
sian PARAsaogs, 12 (or, according to some, 8) Egyptian 
scHcenf. 

The Memorial Line. 

Deg=sGeomatir=sG«r6u8Fre/=StadaJ;5fs:Pers-paraMtt 



TABLE XII. 

SITUATION OF ISLANDS. 
1. EUROPEAN ISLANDS. 

In the i Ic Eland west of Norway — Ice^or 

Northern Ocean ( Britain and Ireland 

In the Baltic . \ f ^^^^^^ I E- of ^u/land-FunZeal- 

I FcNen J Jut 

In the ( MAJOR^a I ^' ^^ ^«^««»a^ 

Mediterranean . J V-vica 1 MiMajorcY Valenci 



* Including Norway and Iceland, 
t Now in posseMft^w of Franoe. 



6EOGRAPH1CA. 



C7 



In the 



ranean 



^rSa '. } "^""^ ^^ G^eiioa-CoSardGej. 

Sicily south of Naples — SiciiVa 

CANDia south of the Archipeiago — Cand- 

Mediter- ^ ^orfu west of ^itfrinto— CorfBiU 

CBPHAloniaW.l c .^ wr rt i_ 

ZANTeW. • loftheitforca-Cepha. 

CEiigo S. . • 3 
.NEGropoot east of 



ZantCe Jib 



Tie Memorial Lines* 



IceNar, VuaZeaUut, MiMajorcY Vaiemd, Ck>SardGen, 
SmNafiBMdArchpelfCod£tU,CephA2daniCtMo^'NegLiv. 

IL ASIATIC ISLANDS. 

" J APan east of North CAina — JapnorCh 
FoRMOsa £. of South C%tsa — Fonn6«m.CAtii 
PmLippine Islands east of the£!eufern Penin- 
sula — PhilipeastPen 
In the LADrone Isl. £. of the /'Atlippines — LadPAt 
Eastern '^ MOLUCca Islands east of the Eeuiem Penin- 
Ooean I sula — Mol(icP-eiw< 

Isles of the Sound sontli^east of the Eoitem 

P-eninsula — SoundP-ecu^ 
MAIidives S. ) of the Western Peninsula — 
LCEYlon E. J Mal-C6yP-toe«^ 

Mediter. ]cyp^^ J south of JVii/olia— RhodCyp2Vato 
ranean ( "® * 

In the f ^TAlimene 'J 

A u* 1 MEtelin . f west of iyTa^olia north to south-* 

ela o 1 ^^^ • • I StalMeSciSimiVii* 
p€ ago (Samos. .} 

The chief of the Mo Lucca Isles are CELSbes or Macas- 
sar, GiLolo, C^Ram, AMBoyna. 

The chief of the PHiLi])pines are MANilla and MiN- 
Banao. 

Isles of the Sound, the chief are SuMAtra, BoRNeo, 
and JAVa. 



68 MBMORlA TECHNICAL 

The Memorial Lines, 

JeiunorCh, VormOsouChin, ^hili^eastPen, LadPAt, Mo- 

IdcP^east, 
SoundP-east, Mal-Ciy P-west, RhodCyp^ato, StilMe- 

SciSimNat. 

MoL=Cele-GilCer-Amb. PHiLssManMind. Sound 
= S uma- Born Jav. 

. III. AFRICAN ISLANDS. 

1 th ^ MADaGAScar, or the Isle of St. Laurence, £. of 
TFth' 1 ^^ south part of Zan^uebar — MadgascZan^ 

•/ Zocotra at the east end of the coast of Ajan — 
A J ZocAjan 

\ St. HsLens west of Congo — HelCongo 
In the r Isles of Cape Verd W. of iVegroland — VerdiVe 
Atlan- ) CANARy Isles west of J^tTc/ulgerid— CwairBild 
tic I Madeirb: Isles west of Barbwry — Msd^irBarb 

Ocean (^ Azore Isles west of Portugal — AzPort 
In the C MALTa south of Sicily — Malt/Sitc 
Mediter- < Pharos at the mouth of the port to AUxan- 
ranean (. dria — Pharii 2ea;an 

The chief of the GANary Istes are FfiRro or Iliero, 
TENErifFe, CANary. 

The chief of the Azores, TERCEra. 

The chief of the Madeira Isles, P6rto SANto and 
MADeira. 

The Memorial Lines. 

MadgascZexn^, Zociijam, H el Con^o, Yerd^e, GandrJ?tl4 
Madlirj8ar6« AzPort^ Malt/Sitc, FhwAlexan. 

Can = FerHi-TeneCan. Az =p Terce. Madeira =a 
PoSanMad. 

IT. AMERICAN ISLANDS. 

NEWFoundland east of Nona, Scotia, — 'NewfNovScot 
CALifornia west of New Granada — Cali Gran 



6EOGRAPHICA. Qi) 

CARiBbee Isles east of the Antilles — CmhAnt 
Lucayos Isles east of Florida — huF 
BERMudas, or Somp^'^rs' Isles, £. of Carolina — Berm Car 
ANTiiies Isles soiii^ >f Zucayos Isles — AntilZuc 

The chief of the Lucayos Islands are BAhama, Lu- 
cayone, PROvidence. 

The chief of the CARibbee Islands are BARBadoes, 
and the Leeward Isles, viz. StCHRistopher's, ANTigua, 
ToBago, &c. 

The chief of the Antillcs Islands are Cuba, JAMaica, 
Hispaniola, Porto Rico. 

The Memorial Lines, 

"NewWovScot, Cali Cran, C&rih Ant, ImF, Berm Car, 
AntilZtec. 

Luc:5=Ba-Lu-Prov. CARissBarb, Chr-Ant-Tob, An- 
TILLS Cu- J am-Hisp-Ric. 



TABLE XIIL 

THE MOST REMARKABLE OF THE LESSER BRITISH ISLANDS. 

SH^Tllnd } ^^^^ ^^ iScotland— Ork-Shetno-Sb 
Holy Island east of iVbr/Aumberland — HolyNorth 
GANYey Island '\ near the C Essex — CanvEss 

Sir/ '^M lTb\t;/i?^H-*-s''«p-^-^- 

ANclesey west of Caernarvonshire — AngCaem 
Man west of Zancashire — ManZan 
RAMsey over against St. Dam'd's Point in Pembroke- 
shire — Ram DavU Pern 
TVight (VfiCtis) south of ZTampshire — Yecs-Ham 

GuERnsey ) ^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ JVormandy— 6ue^-Jerco.JVbr 
JBRsey J ^ 
Western Islands (Esudse) west of jSKcotland — ISthwe'Sc 



70 MBMORIA TECHNICA. 

The Memorial Lines. 

Ork-Shetno-Sb, HolyAorfA, QwoyEu, Shep-ThaiiJire», 

& AngCocrHy 
ManXan, RamHavt-Pem, Vecs-Ham, Guer-Jerco-iVbr» 

£bto€-iSb, 



TABLE XIV. 

ANCIENT BUKOPE, ASIA» AND AFEICA. 

I. Ancient EUROPE, by way of accommodation to the 
present divisions of it, may be divided into, 

1. JVoftAem— containing^ ScAndinavia, Ffiningia, part 
of SARMatia, CiMBrica Chersonesus, CoDanonia Insula. 

2. Middle — containing GERmania, the restof S-armatia, 
6-allia Transalpina or Celtogalatia, RH<£tia,y-indelicia, 
Noricum, part of PAnnonia, D-acia. 

3. Southern — containing Iseria, iTAlia, the rest of 
P-annonia, iLLyricum, McEsia, G-raecia, THracia. 

The Memorial Line. 

£URsSca-Fe, Sarm. Cimb-Cod ; Ger-S, G-Rhoe-V- 
No-Pa-D; Ib-Ita-PIll-MoeG-Th. 

II. ASIA Antiqua may be divided into, 

1. Northern — containing ScYTHia Asiatica, SoODiana, 
CoLchis, Iseria, ALBania. 

2. Middle — containing Asia ilf inor, ARMenia, SYria, 
Mssopotamia, Assyria, MEDia, HYrcania, BACTriana, 
ARaCHosia, BABylonia, Susiana, PARTHia, ARia, 
DRANgiana, PERsis, CARamania, GsDROsia, N-(»th 
part of iNDia, Sfirica, SiNse. 

3. Southern — containing ARabia, the two P-eninsulas 
of iNDia. 

The Memorial Lines* 

ASssScythiSogd, Col-Ib-Alb; Asm- Arm, Sy-Mes-Ass- 

Med-Hy-BactArch, 
Bab-Sus-Farth-AriDian, Pers-Car -Gedro, NInd-8e- 

Sin; Ar-P-Ind. 



GEOGRAPHIC A ANTIQUA. 71 

III. AFRICA was anciently divided into, 

1. Northern — containing MAUritania, T-ingitania, and 
C^sariensis, NuMiDia, Apnea P-ropria, LiBTa (eom- 
prehending C YRenaicaand M ARmarica), £-g3rpt, GjBTttli, 
GARAmanteSy NASamones, PsylU. 

2. Jlftdd^e— containing Li b va Heserta or Interior, com- 
prehending the ATLANTes, PHAunisii, Nicritae, NuBia, 
JETHiopia. 

3. SoHihem — containing the LucjBTHiopes, ERSMbi 
or Troglodytae, BLSMmyes. 

The Memorial Line*. 

AF=:MauT-Caes-Numid-AfP-Liby-(Cyr.Mar)-E, 

GaetGara-NasPsyl ; 
Uhydes = AtldntPhauNig-Nub-^th ; •L6uc»th-£rem* 

Blem. 



TABLE XV. 

ANCIENT ITALY AND GREECE^ ASIA MINOR, SYRIA, AND 

PALESTINE. 

I. Ancient ITALY may be distinguished into two 
general parts — Gallia Cisalpina to the north, and Italy, 
primarily so called, to the south. 

The several people of Gallia Cisalpina were these : 

*LiGures, TAurini, SEgusiani, SAlassi, Lspontii, 
EuGanei, RHJETi, CARni, Istri, VENeti; (south of the 
P-o these) A-nanes, Boii, LiNGones, SENones; (north 
of the Po these) Lisici, L^vi, iNSubres, ORobii, Ceno- 
mani. 

iTalia, primarily so called, or the south parts of Old 
Italy, comprehending these following countries and people: 

fETRUria or Tyrrhenia, SABini, LAtium, CAmpania, 
Picentini, G-raecia Magna, jUMbria, Piceuum, V-estini, 

* Lying in order along the Alps. 

^ Lying in order on the Mare Inferunu 

X Lying in order on the Mare Superum. 



72 MBMORIA TICHNICA. 

MArucici, FRentani, Apulia, "^MARSi, PELigni, Sam- 
Kium, UlRPini. 

The Memorial Lines. 

Cis as Lig-Tau-S^-Sa-Lep-Eug-Rhaet-Car-Is, Ven (P) 

A- Bo- Ling-Sen; 
Lib-Lnv-Ins-Oro-Gen. — 
It = Etru-Sab-U-Ca-Pi-G, Um-Pi-V-Ma-Fr-Ap, 

Mars-PeliSamn-Hirp. 

II. Ancient GREECE was usually divided into five 
general parts,yiz. MAcedonia,THessalia,EpiRus,HELlas 
or GrsBcia, properly so called, and PELoponnesus. 

The Memorial Line. 
GR-«:=MdTh, Epir-HelPel. 

1. PELOPonnesus was divided into six parts or regions, 
v'z. fAcHaia, Elis, MESSenia, LAConia, ARgia or Ar- 
golis, xARCADia. 

The Memorial Line, 
Pei^opss Ach-Eli-M6ss-Lac-Ar-Arcad. 

r 

2. Epirus contained these people and countries, viz. 
CHAones, DRYopes, THESPRorii, CAssiopaei, Amphi- 
Lochi, ALmene, MoLossi, AcARNANia. 

The Memorial Line, 

Ep zz Chao-Dry, Thesprot-Cass-Ampkiloc, Al-Mol- 
Acarnan. 

3. Hellas, or GRJEcia PROVRia (called also Achaia), 
was divided into eight parts, viz. Doris, LocRis-Epic- 
nemidia, JBTolia, LocRis-Ozolaea, Pnocis, BcBotia, 
MEGaris, Arrica. 

The Memorial Line, 

Grje-Propri =: D6-LocrCp, -aEto-LocrOz-Pho-Eoe- 

Meg-Att. 



* Id the inland parts. 

'*' Lying in order on the Ionian, ^gean, and Cretan sea, 

X In the inland. 



6E06RAPHICA ANTIQUA. 73 

4. THESsalia contained these several parts, viz. Pe- 
LASgiotis, EsTiotis, THESSaliotis, PHTHiotis, M-agnesia. 

The Memorial Line* 
THESS—PelasEstTh^ss-Phthi-M. 

5. Some of the more remarkable people and countries 
of MACEdonia were, TAULantii, PjEones, MTGDonia, 
^MATHia, AMPHaxitis, Pieria. 

The. Memorial Line. 
MACEssTaul-Paeo-Mygd-^math -AmphPi. 

Asia Minor comprehended Asia Propria, BiTHynia, 
Pontus, GAlatia, *CAPPadocia: — Lvcia, PAMPHYlia, 
UiLicia. 

The Memorial Line. 

A8m=sAsp-Bith-P6-Ga-Gapp: Lyci-Pamphy-Cil. ^ 

Asia Propria contained PHRYGiaMtnor, MYSia JIftnor, 
Mysia ilfajor, iEoLis, loNia, LYDia, PHRYgia JIfajor, 
CARia, Doris. 

The Memorial Line. 

Asp = Phryginitit-Mysifni-iiiy JEol loni-Lyd-Phryma, 
Car Do. 

GALatia comprehended PoNtus GALAticus, PAPHla- 
gonia, GALAtia Propria, Isauria, and part of Pisidia; 
the other part of which, with the regions of Carbalia, 
was contained in Pamphylia. 

The Memorial Line. 
GAL^PonGalaPaphGalaj? Is-Pis. 

SYRia was divided into four parts: SYRia Propria, 
PHCBNicia, CcELOsyria, PALestina. 

PALestine was distinguished into GAiila^a, Sam Aria, 
JuD£a, PERaea or Judaea beyond Jordan, iDUMaea. 

The Memorial Line. 

Syr = SyrpPhcen-CcElo-Pal. Pal « GdlSamaJudae- 
Per Idum. 

* Among the several regions of Cappadocia was Lycaonia* 

B 



74 MEMORIA TEGHNICA. 

TABLE XVI. 

ANCIENT GALLIA, GERMANIA, IBERIA, BRITANNIA. 

1. GALiia was divided by Augustus into four parts or 

Srovinces, viz. Gallia BELgica, Gallia CfiLTica or Lug- 
unensis, Gallia Aguitanica, and Gallia NARBonensis — 
G ALL= BelCelt AquiNarb 

2. The inhabitants of ancient GfiRMany were compre- 
hended under four general denominations, viz. iNCaevones, 
VANDali, IsTaevones, HERmiones — GERM=Ing-Vand 
Ist-Her. 

3. iBERia, or ancient Spain, was distinguished into three 
general parts, viz. TARraconensis, Lusitanica, B-<Btica — 
lBERi=TarLuB. 

4. BRiTannia, according to the last division by the 
Romans, was distinguished into five parts, viz. VALencia, 
MAxima Caesariensis, BRiTannia iSbcunda, FLAvia Csesa- 
riensis, BRiTannia Prima, — BRiT=eValMax, Britse-Fla, 
Britpn'm. 

The Memorial Lines, 

GALL=BelCelt AquiNarb. GERM=Ing-Vand Ist-Her. 

I=TarLuB. 
BRiT=ValMax, Brit«e-Fla, Britprtm. 

The Memorial Lines for all the /tncient Cfeography. 

EUR=Sca-Fe, Sarm, Cimb-Cod ; Ger-S, G-Rhoe-V- 

No-Pa-D; Ib-ItaPIll-MoeGTh. 
ASssScythiSogd, Col-Ib-Alb; Asm.Arm, Sy-Mes-Ass- 

Med-Hy-BactArch, 
Bab-Sus-Farth-AriDran, Pers-Car -Gedro, Nlnd-Se- 

Sin; Ar-P-Ind. 
AF=:MauT-C8Bs.Numid-AfP-Liby-(Cyr-Mar).E, 

GaetGara-NasPsyl ; 
Lihydes = AtldntPhauNig-Nub-j£th; L^ucaeth-Erem- 

Blem. 
Cis = Lig-Tau-S6-Sa-Lep-Eug-Rh»t-Car-Is, V^n (P) 

A- Bo- Ling- Sen ; 
Lib-Laev-Ins-Oro-Cen. — — 



6B06RAPHIGA ANTIQUA. 



75 



It = Etru-Sab-Ld-Ca-Pi-G, Um-Pi-V-Ma-Fr-Ap, 

Mars-PeliSamn- Hir p. 
GRiE=MdTli, £pir-HelPel. PELOP«Ach-£li-M6s»- 

Lac-Ar-Arcad. 
Ep = €hao-Dry, Thesprot-Cass-Amphiloc, Al-Mol- 

Acarnan. 
Grje-Propri = D6-LocrEp, JEto-LocrOz-Pho-Bce- 

Meg-Att. 
THESS=PelasE8tTh6ss-Phthi-M. MACE=Taul-Paeo- 

Mygd-iGmath -AmphPi. 

Asm=Asp-Bith-P6-GrarCapp: Lyci-Pamphy-Cil. 

Asp = Phrygii»i»-]Jf ysimi-fii, Mo\ loni-Lyd-Phryma* 

CarDo. 

GAL=:PoiiGalaPaphGalap Is^Pis* 

S Y R = SyrpPhoen-Ccelo-Pal. Pal = GdlSamaJudae- 

Per Idum. 
GALL=6elCeltAquiNarb. GERM=Ing->yand Ist-Her. 

I=TarLuB. 
BRiT=ValMax, Britse-Fla, Biitprim* 



TABLE XVII. 



REMARKABLE PLACES IN ANCIENT 6B06RAPHT* 



ABDERa in ThraciVL 
BsRTtus in Phcenici^ 
HsLicon in Phocis 
HALiCARnassus in Doris in 

^sia Minor 
CHERonaea in Bceoiia. 
CANnae in Peucetia, 
ARBela Assyria. 
GRANicus river of PArygia 
M JEander river of LydidL 
Tagus river of Ximlania 
Issus promont. of Ct7icia 
PATmos one of the Sporade& 

Islands 
OLTMpia in Elis 

E 



Py^us in Jlfessene 
MARATHon in Attica 
DELf^os in Phocis 
SAMOSAta in Comagene 
DYRRachium in itfacedonia 
Thess ALonica mAmphaantis 
Nicomedia in JSt^^nia 
NYSsa in Megoiis 
AcROCeraunia m. in Epirva 
CiTHaeron m. in Baotia, 
HTMettus m. in Attica 
Athos m. in JIfacedonia 

Lympus 1 mountains m 
2 



76 



MEMORIA TBCHNICA. 



MANTioea in ylrcadia 
EpiDAurus in Laconia. 
PELLa in ^mathisL 
AcTium ) . 
AMbracia }>»^«»»^«a 

SMYRNa ) ■ r • 

EPHeaus !"»^*«'* 
PEROamus in My sib. 
LAODicea in Caria 

SARDis 1 

T H Y Atira > in LydisL 

PHiLadelphia ) 
SARDica m TArocta 
CHALcedon in ^ithynia 
GiRTium in iVumidia 
iLLiBeris in Hup, BceticB, 
ANcyra in GalatisL 
GANGra in PopAlagonia 
SiRMium ill Pannonia 
NfiocJESarea in Cappadocia 
PHARsalia in Tkessaha, 
*PHiLlppi in UiractA 
LEUCtra in j^oeotia 
CLUsium in Etruria. 
BAiae in Campania, 
Tusculum in Za^ium 
AQuiLEla of the Cami 
EDESsa in JIfesopotamia 
RHEGium in Calabria 
Tomi in itfavia 
DAMascus in Ccelo Syria 
CoLOSSse in Phrygia. 
SAGuntum in Hispania Tar- 

raconensis 
5Ri}N0U8ium in Cambria 
GoMagene a region of Syria 

Propria 



Do Done a town of theJfo/ossi 
SpARTa in Xaconia 
ANTioCHia in Pisidia, 
ANTium of the VoUci 
AmycI« in Xaconia 
ARlMinum in Umbria, 
CoRinth ) i„ ^^i^ 

GENCHRaeae 5 
EliEUSis in Megaria 
AcBRRae in Campania 
Ghalcis in j^ifolia 
GoRFiNium I of the Pc- 
SuLMo S ^^^^ 

MfiMPHis in Inferior ^jgypt 
THEBais in i§»fiperior J%ypt 
MYCENse in iir^ia 
PATAra in Lycia, 
GHALYbes a people of Ga- 

fotia 
NfiMea in Argia 
ADRAMYTtium in Mysia 
GNidus in Doris in iisia 
M EDiOLanum of theiiMubres 
SYRACUsae in Sicily 
PATavia of the Veneti 
lUium in Phrygia Minor 
GARBALia in PampAylia 
LYCAonia in Gippadocia 
GYZicum in Myna 
GuMa in JEhlis 
Pisidia part in Pamphylia, 

part in Galatia 
GuRes of the SaMni 
LAYiNium in Lativtm 
ARDea of the RutuM 
Portus LiBURNus in EtvurisL 
TEGaea in Arcadia 



* Why Philippi it said to be in Macedonia, Acts x?i, 19, see 
Wells's Geography, ehap* xt^ wd Pearce on the Epistles. 



Lucani ) - r% 

BRtrrii 1 "• ^"«""* 

OENOTria ) parts of Graciei 

MESSAPia 5 ilfagna 

DAUNia ) 4, c A V 
PEUCETia {parts of Apulia 

Herni }in^'i«n»^^vum 

MuTlna of the Boii 
KAveNna in Vmbm 
CALAbri ) • AC 
SALentini I'^^^^^V'^ 



6E0GRAPH1CA ANTIQUA. 77 

A „„ ^ J in Latium Novum 
Ausones ) 



c A «^^„^T i in iirabiaFefix 
•Saracen ) 

N AB ATHsei iu^ rabiaPe/raea 

NoMades ^ in Arabia, 

ScENitae 3 Deserta 

S^TDon' }in^A««icia 
Bippo in Aumidia 
PALMyra in Ccelo-SyridL 
No La in Campanio, 
TARENTum of the Sa/entini 



The Memorial Lines, 

Abder Thra, Bery Phcen, HelicoPA, HalicdrDor-il, Cher- 

Bce, 
Can Peiuset, Arh Ass, Gran PA, MvdLydi, Ti^Lusit, IsCil, 
VaXSporad, OlymElis, VylMes, Marathii«ica, Del PAo, 
SamosaGMft, Dyrr Mac, TheaaalAmphax, 'NicBithy, Nyss- 

Meg, 
AcxdcEpir, CithUcB, Hymilf, AihMac, 01-Pel-O Thessal, 
Mant/lrc, EpidauJLac, PeWJEmath, Act-Am^cantait, 
Smym-Eph ion, VetgMys, Laod Car, Sard-Thya-PhiiZycf, 
SardTAract, ChalJ?, CirtiVum, ^WxhUisp-Bost, AncGala, 

GangPapA, 
SirmPan,NeocaesCap,PharsTAeMa,PhilipTAract,Leuc££e, 
Clus£'/ru, Bai Campo, TuscXa/,- A quilei Car, £dessillfe«, 
1ihegCa2a6rl,ToM(Btf, DamCcB^<$f,Col6ssPAry^t, Sa.g!;Tat, 
Brund Ca2a, Oom^Si, DodMol, Spart£ac, Ant6chPm(/, 

Ant Vols, 
AmycLac, Arim Umb, Cori-CenchriJcAy Eleusilfe^, Acerr- 

Ca?np, 
Chalc^f,CorfiniPe/, SulmPe/, Mem^hinferE,ThehsupE, 
Mycen Arg, PataZi^c, ChalyCra/, Nem^r^r , Adraniyt^fcTys, 
CniDor--^, Medio] Ins, Syracu^tci, PatFewe*, IlPAry-n, 
CarbdliPompA, Lyca Cap, Cyziyi^y9,Cuni.^/t, PisPam-G, 
CuriSId^, LaviniXa/, Ard Rut, Liburn £^nc, Teg^rc, 
Luc-BrutOeno^, OeuoCr<e-ffi, Messap€rr<e-ifi, Dauni* 

Peucet^p, 



78 



MEMORIA TBCHNICA. 



Mqa-HeTuLat-n, MutiJSoi, 'Ra.ynUmb, Cala-SaliUfeyVol- 

AusLat-n, 
Sab-Sdracen-4ra-Pe/, NabathPc^, 'NomScen Arab- Des, 
Tyr-SidPAoBM, 'HippoNum, YalmCal-S, "NolCampa, 

Tarent&/. 



TABLE XVIII. 



THE CORRESPONDENCE OF ANCIENT AND PRESENT OEOGRAFHY. 



Ancient. Present. 

/- Poland 
S ARMatia \ Great TartSLvy 
[SarmPo- -/south part of 
Ta- RusL] J Riissia. 
V iivonia 
CiMBrica Cher- ) ^^^j^^^ 
sonesus ) 

*InsuIaCoDA- \ Zealmd 
Noma 3 

ScAndinaTia iS^^^tof 
orB-altia \s„J^n 

ScYTHia As. & ) Great 
SoGdiana ) 3\rtary 

AcHaia or Hellas LitMcCia. 
Epirus . . . ChitnddTB, 
THESSaly . • JanudL 
McBsia superior . ^Sfervia 
McEsia inferior . J^ulgaria 
P^LOponnesus . Morea. 



REGIONS AND PROVINCES. 
Ancient. 



Present. 

C itfo/davia 
. < TFalachia 

t Transilva. 
. Croatia 

{Croatia 
Da/matia 
C J^avaria 

* ( ^K^ria 
C Suahia. 

' ( J^avaria 

i Grisons 
. < Tyrol and 

Ipartof/^aly 
. Switzerlaxid 
. Savoy 

• ilfin^relia 

> Georgh 
^i/c?u1gerid 



DACia . . 

LiBURnia . 
iLLYRicum 

NoRicum . 

ViNDilicia 

RHiETia . 

HELVetii . 
ALLOBroges 
CoLCHis . 
iBERia. . 
ALBania . 
GjETULia . 

Africa Pro- C IWpoli 
pria . . ,\ and Tunis 



:ia 



THracia . . . iSomania 

I ( inorocco 

* Zealand, Funen, and the adjoining isles had the common name 
of IiisuliB ^modes, and were esteemed isles of ancient Qermany, 
being inhabited by the Teutoni, called also Codani. 



GEOORAPHICA ANTIQUA. 



79 



Ancient. 

LiBYa Pr. . • 

NuMiDJa . . 
LiBya De- 

serta . . . 

Nioritae . . 

TAURica 
CuERSonesus 

GARAmantes^ 



Present 

Baroi 
Algievs 

> Zaara 

iVe^roland 
The penin- 
sula of Lit- 
tle TartBxy 
C The deserts 



{ 



Ancient Present. 

NuMidiaiVbva Bildulgerid 

SooDiana . { ^^^J - 

iBeria. . . Spain 
CANTAbria . Bisca,y 
ALBion . . BriteAn 
LiGUres . . Genoa 
ARMeniaMaj. Turcomania 
ARMenia Min. AladuVw, 
MESoPotamia Diarbec 



of Zaara 

The Memorial Lines, 

SdirmPo-Ta-RusL, CimhJut, CodanZea/, Sca-B;S^t&e-j!Vb, 

Scyth-SogT, 
AchLivad, EpiCAtm, ThessJ^an, Moes^r-^, PeloMor, 

ThjRojM, 
PanHten^, DaciiWb/- TTa- T, Libur Cro, Illyri Cro-Daf, 
Nor Bavar-Au8, Y\ndSua-B, T^h^dtGris-Tyr-It, Helv- 

Stoit, A116b^at;, 
ColchMingj Iber- Alb Geor, GtetulBild, Afric2LTrip-Tun, 
MsiuFeZ'Mor, JAhyBarc, 'NumidAlgf Lib-desZara, Nig- 

Neg, 
Taur-Chers7arfy GaraZoar, 'Numi-noY Bil, So^dZagat, 

IhSpain, 
Cantai^M & Alb^nV, Ligu Gen, Arm Turc- A 2a, MespDt. 



TABLE XIX. 

SEAS, STRAITS, OULFS, ISLANDS, RIVERS, TOWNS. 
Ancient Present 

Mare Hyrcanum, or CASPium . Sea of Sala or J^acAu 

Pontus Euxinus Black or Euxine Sea 

^oaean Sea Archipelago 

PROPontis Sea of Marmoia, 

Palus IHjEOTis Sea of Azov 

FRETum GADitanum . . . Strait of Gibraltar 
Bosphorus CiMMerius . . . Strait of Ca^a 
Bosphorus Thracicus . . . Strait of Con^tontioople 



80 



MEMORIA TECHNICA. 



Ancient. 
HELLESPOntuS . • 

8inus ADRiATicus 
Sinus SALAMinius 
Sinus GANgeticus • 
Sinus PersIcus . 
Sinus CoRiNTHiacus 
Sinus ARABicus . 
FRETum Siculum 
Sinus AMBracicus 
Mare LiGUsticum . 
Sinus Maguus 
Mare TYRRhenum 



Present. 

Strait of the Dafdanells 
Gulf of Venice 
Gulf of J^n^ia 
Bay of BengdA 
Gulf of BaUora. 
Gulf of Zepanto 
Red Se2i 

Straits of MessiutL 
G ulf of Larta, 
Sea of Genoa. 
Bay of Siam 
Sea of Tuscany 



ISLANDS, RIVERS, AND TOWNS. 



Ancient Prawnt. 

THULe . . Iceland 
Ebusus • . Fvica 

BALEares < mfp 

I A/inorca 

Ins. jflBolise . Lipari Isles 

I.FoRTunatae Canaries 

*HESPerides C. Verd 

TABROBana Ceylon 

Cos . . . Lango 

CRETe . . Candy 

CAssiTerides Scilly Isles 

EuBoeavel ^jf^.^^^^^ 

He di Compare 
. Engia 
.-fMadagascav 
• St. Maura 
. Metelin 
. Palmosa 



CHALCis 

iTHAca . 
j^GlNa . 

CERNe . 

LEUcas . 
Lesbus . 
PATmos . 



Diosco Rides Zocotra 



Ancient. 

Lemuos . . 
GADes . . 
Cyrnus . . 
SALAmis • . 
CARPathus . 
TRiNACria . 
Cyt Heron . 

M. ^TNA . 

M.VesuvIus 
Laeus Tra- ) 
simenus ) 
RuBieon . . 
Padus or 
ERiDanus 



Present 

Stalimene 
Cadiz 
Corsica, 
Coluri 
Scarpanto 
Sicily 
Cferigo 
Gtbel 
Soma, 
Lake of 
Perugia 
Fiumec'ino 



\ 



Po 



FsTer . . . Danube 
B^Tis . . Guadalquiver 
TANAis . . Don 
Rha . . . Volga 
Bo R YSThenes Nieper 



* Galled also Oorgades. 

t Madagascar is supposed by some to be the Menuthias of the 
ancients. 



GB06RAPHICA ANTK^UA. ' 81 



Ancient Present 

AKGBKTora: j^^^burg 

turn . . . ) ° 

MoGuntium . Mentz 

CoLonia Allo ) r^ 
, > Geneva 

brogum . . ) 

RoTHomagia . l^ouen 

TiGunim . . Zurich 



Ancient Present 

SAGuntum . • MorvedTh 
CALPe . . • Gibraltar 
CoLonia ) ^ > 

AGRiPpinse , ) ^ 



LuGduDum . . Lyons 
JGdunum 7 

B-atavorum . ) 



LuGdunum 1 r j 

> Leyden 



The Memorial Lines. 

i^VLspSala-Back, Eux J^/acA, MgArch, PropiKf^irmo, M aeot- 

Zov^ 
Trei'GiidiGib, CimmCaff, ThmciCanst, HellespDar, 

A drat Fen, 
Sin-SalamjEk^, GanJ^en^, VetsBah, Si-CorinthZep, 

Arih Red-S, 
Trei-^icuMess, AmhLart, LiguGen^ Sin-Mag^Sta, Tyrr- 

Tusc. 

Thul/ce, Eb^s Yv, "BeAeMa-m, Molipare, FortCan, 
Hesp Verd,T2ipTohCei/l, CosLangy CratCandyj CtLasitScill, 
Chalc-Eub iV6(/, lihB,Comp, MginEng, CernMada, Leuc- 

Manr, 
heshMetelin, Pat PaZm, Diosc6rZoc, LemStali, GadCacf, 
CyruCornc, SalaCb/, CarpiSbarp, TrinacSici, CythCer, 
JEtnaGi, \esuy Som, TrasiPcr, RuhiFium, Pad-EridPo. 

IstDanu, 3?diGiiadal,TQ,nsL Don, 'Rho, Volga, BorystNiep. 

ArgentStras, MogMentz, Col- A 11 Gen, R6tho/2o, TigZter, 
SagMorvec/, CalpGi6, Col- AgripCo/, hugLyo, hug-BLeyd. 

N, B. It was thought needless to give more examples, 
especially of such as now have any likeness or affinity in 
their ancient names; as Ta^guA Taio, Sequanus Seyne, 
Rhenus Rhine, Garumna Garonne, Zacynthus Zante, 
Melita Malta, &c. 



K 3 



Se MBMORIA TEGHNICA« 



GEOGRAPHIA SACRA. 



TABLE XX. 

THE PLANTATION OF THE EARTH AFTER THE FLOOD. 

And first, the several countries mentioned in holy 
Scripture, and denominated from some of the posterity 
of SHEM, viz. 

OPHir, conjectured to be part of the East Indies, viz. 
Aurea Ckersonesus of the ancients — OphChers. 

HAVilah, part of Susiana and C^ramania — HaviiStes- 
Car, 

ELAm, part of ;$fi»iana and Petsis — lEXsiSus-Pers, 

AssHUR, or Assyria properly so called, into which 
Nimrod is said to come and build Nineveh, &c. — Asshur. 

Aram, part of Syrio, and Mesopotamia — ArimSy-Mes, 

Land of Uz, Judaea Persea and the adjoining parts of 
ARAbia Deserta and Petraea — UzJ6/9-Arad'. , 

LuD, or Lydm in Asia Minor — LudXj^c^. 

The Memorial Lines. 

Oph CAer«, Havifi>M«- Car, Ela^Sfus-Pers, ArkmSy-Mes^ 

Asshur, 
UzJ6p-Arac?, IxALyd. ^ 

Countries mentioned in the Scriptures, and denomi- 
nated from the posterity of JAPHET, (eldest son of 
Noah,) whose family is supposed to have peopled, be- 
sides a considerable part of Asia, all Europe. 

MADai, called by heathen writers Media — Mad. 

GoMER, thought to be A/iania, on the Euxine Sea — 
QcometAlb, 

ToGArmah, Cappadocia — Toga Cop. 

AsHKEnaz, PArygia — AshkePA. 

TuBal, Zderia in Asia — ^Tubi&^it. 



6E0GRAPHIA SACRA. 83 

M ESHECHy the country lying about the Montes Moschici, 
between Colchis and Armenia Major—Mesh^chMoscA. 

MAGog, the parts of Scythiti adjoining to the planta- 
tions of Meshechy Tubal, and Gomer — MeL^Scythi-Mesh, 

JAVan, ancient Greece — JavGree. 

ELiSHah, or the Isles of Eiisha, the Isles of the ilrcAi- 
pelago — Eilshil ?'cA. 

KiTTim, understood of Italy, Dan. xi. 30, and of Mace- 
donia in the book of Maccabees — Kittlta, 

TARSHish, by Josephus understood to be CiZicia, by 
others Old Spain, by others Carthage — TarshOeV. 

The Memorial Lines. 

Mad, Gomer ^/6, Toga Cap, AshkePA, TuhlbM, Me- 

sh^chMosch, 
MogScythi-Meshy J&vGree, l^lishArch, Kitilta, TaxshCiL 

Countries mentioned in Scripture, denominated from 
the posterity of HAM (youngest son of Noah), whose 
family peopled Africa, with the adjoining parts of Asia. 

Land of CusH, (commonly rendered JEthiopio,,) — 

Cush^i^Atop, — under which name seems to have been 

contained most of Arabia, distinguished into several 

parts, denominated from the posterity of Cush, as, 

SHEBa, ArahiB, FeVix — Shebi4ra-/. 

H Avilah, part of Arabia Deserta, next to Babylonia 

— Havilra-rf. 
KAamath and DEDan, parts on the Persian GuU — 
— Ra-D^Pe-G«. 
MiZRaim, or -^gypt — M'lzrJE, 

LuB or Lybim, that is, Lybia properly so called — Lub. 
Phut, the more remote parts of Libya, largely taken — 
PhutLtT*. 

Land of CANAan lying between the river «/ordan and 
the Mediterranean — Canau/or-M. 

Land of Hamath, north part of Phcenicia, and adjoin- 
ing parts of ;Siyria Propria — HamMiPhcen-S. 

ARvad, or Arpad, or the Isle Aradus, lying over against 
Hamath — A rvHama. 

Land of the PHiiistines, Palestine Proper~PhilPa/. 



84 MEMOfilA TBCUNICA. 

The Memorial Lines, 

CushuEthiop, l&heh Ara-f, UdLvJra-d, Ra-DedPe-Gw,] 

MizrJE^ 
Lub, PhutXt6, C^nvLJar-M, HamdthPA<en-5, Aiv Hama^ 

PhilPa/. 



TABLE XXI. 

DIVISION OF THE HOLY LAND. 

The kiugdom of JUDAH contained the tribes of 
Judah and B-enjamin — Ju-B. 

The kingdom of ISRAEL contained the tribes of 
A-sher, NEphtali, ZEbulon, Issachar,! 

half of MAnassehy Dan, E-phraim, i west of Jordan 

Simeon ) 

RsuBen, G-ad, the other half of M-a- ) a. c i ji 

naaeh . } east of Jordan 

The several nations were the CAnaanites, the Gir- 
Gashites, the HiTtites, the Hivites, the AMorites, the 
JsbusiteSy and the P-erizzites. 

The Memorial Lines, 

ISR s^ A-NeZe -M, IssMa -G, Dan-£ -R6ub, Si : 
Ca-Gifg-Hit-Hiv, Am-Je-P. 

TBE DIVISION OF THE HOLY LAND IN THE NEW TESTAMENT COMPARED 
WITH THE DIVISIONS THEREOF AMONG THE TWELVE TRIBES IN THE 
OLD TESTAMENT. 

GAlilee contained A-sher, NEphtali, Z-ebulon, and 
Issachar — GAL=A-NeZIss. 

SAMaria contained EPHraim, with the half of MANasseh 
— SAM=sManEph. 

Judaea contained Dan, parts of Simeon and Judah, 
with B-enjamin— J Us: DdnSi-Ju-B. 

iDumaea contained the south parts of Simeon and 
J-udahy and some part of the land of E-dom — ]d= 
Si-JE. 



6EOGRAPHIA SACRA. 85 

PBRsea contained E.-euben, GAd, and the other half 
of lVI-anasseh~PER=M GaR. 

The Memorial Line, 

GAL=A-NeZIss. SAM=Man£ph. Ju = I>^nSi-Ju-B. 
lDc=Si-JE. PER=MGaR. 

The land of Edom bordered on the <outh of «/ttcfaea— 
"EAtmsJud. 

The land of the Mo Abites lay on the north-east of Edom 
— M69neEd, 

The land of the AMmonites lay on the north-east of 
Moab — A mneMotib, 

The ISHmaelites, MADianites, and AMalekites lived 
promiscuously together, and therefore seem to be denoted 
by the common name of the Mingled People, or ^ra6ians, 
from 'yyi miscuity from whence the Greek appellation 
of ^Apa\j/, or "Apafiee — Ish-Mad-A m Arab. 

The Memorial Line, 
'Ed6m8Jud, M6sneEdf AmneMoab, Ish-Mad-Amv^ra6. 



TABLE XXII. 

THE MOST REMARKABLE RIVERS, WITH THE PLACES WHERE 
THET RISE, AND THE SEAS INTO WHICH THEY FALL. 

IN EUROPE. 

The VoLga, the greatest river in Europe, rises in 
Russia., and fails into the Caspian Sea — VolRus-Ca, 

The DANube rises in ;SiiMi6ia, and falls into the J^t^ine 
Sea — Dan Suab- Eux. 

The B/HiNe rises in the country of the Gri^ons, and 
falls into the German Ocean — Rhin Gm-Ger-O. 

The ViSTula, or Wesel, rises in Poland, and falls into 
the JBaltic—VistPo-Ba. 

The NiEper rises in Poland, and falls into the Euxine 
Sea — NieP-JEJtM:. 



86 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

The DwiNa rises in i2tt«3ia/and falls into the gulf of 
the Northern Ocean, called the White Sea — Dwinjf^tes- 
Whi. 

The Taio in ;^in falls into the ^//antic Ocean — 
TaiSp-Atl-Oc. 

The Iserus, or Ebro, in Spain . •! r n • ^ 4U 

The RHODanus, or Rhone, in France VJ?]^!?/^ ***® 
-Ib-RhodMed ........ . J ^^^iterranean 

The Elbc in Germany falls into the German Ocean — 
Elb Ger-Oc. 
The ODer in Germany falls into the Baltic — OdBalt. 



IN ASIA. 



T-igris and EuPHrates rise in Armenia Major, and, 
having joined streams on the south-east of Mesopotamia, 
fall into the iS^inus Persicus — T-Euph-^rm-iSii/*. 

JoRDan rising in the border of VepAtali, and passing 
through the Lake of Gennesaret, falls into the Salt Sea 
— JordNeph- Salt. 

GANges in /ndia falls into the Bay of ^en^al Ginl- 
Beng, 

IN AFRICA. 

The NiLe, running through the middle of Egypt, falls 
into the Mec^iterranean — 'NilMedi, 

The SENegal runs through Negroland into the ^dantic 
Ocean — S^n^^ 

The Memorial Lines. 

Yo\Rus-Cay DeLuSuab'Eux, RhinGrtt-Ger.O,VistPo jBa, 

NieP-Eux, 
BwinRus-Whi, TBiSp-Jtl-Oc, Ib-Rhodflfed, ElbGcr-Oc, 

OdBalt: 
T-Euph^m-SiP, GhiLBeng, JoidNeph-Salt: miMedi, 

Sin At. 



ASTRONOMICA, 



SECTION IV. 

THE APPLICATION OF THIS ART TO ASTRONOMY AND 

CHRONOLOGY. 

Th£ technical endings affixed to the beginnings of the 
names of the planets, represent the number of miles of 
their diameters, distances, magnitudes, &c. according to 
the general key. Where the beginning of the word is 
technical, it is composed of the syllables or letters distin> 
guished in the tables by small capitals. 



TABLE I. 

THE D-IAMETER8, &e. OF THE PLANETS IN ENGLISH MILES, 
ACCORDING TO DR. DERHAm's ASTRO-THEOLOGY. 

English Miles. 

Luna — hvL'ddapu 2,175 

MERCXJry — Mercii-depok 2,748 

Mars — alBX'dokpu 4,875 

VEnus — Ve-donetp 4,987 

TERrae DiAmeter — Ter-dieLpousoi,k . . * . 7,967*8 

SAturn — Sa-dni-o/tt 93,451 

Jupiter— Ju-da*y-«/« 130,653 

Soiis Diameter — Sol-diked-dfei .... 822,148 

The D-iameters of their ORsits. 

SATum — jy-ovh-^itasob-les-teis .... 1,641.526,386 
Jupiter^Ju-rbA;oti/-afo^A 895.134,00(1 



88 MBMORIA TECHNICA. 

English Milea. 

MArs— Ma-rbe«e-<iei<f-ita2 262.282,910 

TERrm^D'OTh'Terboid-dze-jHrnl , . . 172.102,796 

Msrcury — Me-vhsau-sebth 66.621,000 

YEnus—ye-vhbef-okfA'baf 124.487,114 

LuNa-— D-orb-Lunop^-nj^/ 479,905 

SATurni ANnuli Diam. or the diameter of 

Saturn's ring — Sa,i'&nU'did6z'daul . . 210,265 

Ejusdem LATitudo, or the breadth of 

Saturn's ring IsLtidoH-eg .... 29,200 

TERrae SupERficies, or the superficial con- 
tent of the earth — Tev -super ann-f of -ezau 199.444,206 

Ejusdem DiAmeter — -—didipousoi,k 7,967*8 

-Ejusdem Orbit® PERiMeter per- 






mufy'SkaU'M 540.686,225 



TBE MAGNITUDES OB SOLID CONTENTS IN CUBIC MILES OF THE 

LABOEB PLANETS. 

MAGNITudo. 

Cabic Miles. 

TERra^-^Ter-maguite^o-A/aum 264,856.000,000 

Sous — MsLg'SGiiaeo^z-noia 

mil-mil 290,971.000,000.000,000 

Jovis—MtLg'JorneZ'Z&b'ezym 920.011,200.000,000 
SATurni -^ 8at-magnito^/>-c/aA; 

& izym 427.218,300.000,000 

1. The A Mbit or Circumference. 

Englirfi Miki^ 

Jovis— Am-Jovistpo^-zo^ 379,043 

T-errae— Am-Tc/-ytA 25,031 

&OL\8--Am-So\e-leid'koit 2.582,873 

The Memorial Lines, 

Lu«d(2apti, Merc^-depoA, Mar-doApze, Ter-diapotuot,^, 
Ju'daty-sHf Ve-donetp, Sa-dnl-oicc, Sol-diA;ecf-4/^t. 



ASTRONOMICA. 



&) 



D'Orh'SiUuob'leg-'teis, Ju-rhkoiil^itoth, Md^vhese'deid-TMz, 
D'orh-Terboid-Aze-poul, Me'Thmu-sebthfYe-Thbef-okf^ baf, 
Sat-anu-didiz-c2a«l, — loXidSu-eg, D'Orh-hunopbu-nyl^ 
Ter-superanji;/o/^eza«, — diapouwifk, — ^^Tmufy-skavrdeL 

Ter-rndL^nit^so-klaum, Mag-S61iseotiz>no2a-mil -mil, 
Mag-Jovnez'Zdb-ezym, Sat-magnito^p-ciaA; & izym, 

Am'Joy'mpo^zotf Am-Te/-yi6, Am-Soie-letct-^ot/. 



TABLE 11. 

THE DIAMET£B8» Ac. 09 THE PLANETS, ACCORDINO TO 

MR. WUISTON.* 



Luna — hn-ddedi . . . 
MsRCUry — M^rcii-depap 
Mars — Mar-de^^tc . 
TERra — ^Ter-diaA;^zc . 
Jupiter — Ju'dle-led . 
Vsnus — Ye-donob . . 
SAturn — SdL'dot-nel . 
Sol — SoUdifouf'dzy . 



2,223" 
2,717 

'^^ English Miles 

4,941 *®^^- 

43,925 
494,100^ 



2. Their DiSTances from the Sun.f 

English Mil«ti 

SATurn— Dista-Sat2(fi-2oz<A 513.540,000 

Mars— Dist-MdrA;6-<i(M/M 82.242,000 

MERcury — Dist-Merez-ouie^A .... 20.952,000 
Jupiter — Jupi(/6i«-uAetA 280.582,000 



* Theory of the Earth, page 81, &c. 

t The distances of the planets from the Sun, according to Dr. 
Derham, are as follow : 

SATam— -Dist-Sat4;e2-palie-aiti . . . 820.768,193 



MAii»^Dist-Mar6t6-&o6-o/tt 
MERCury — Dist-MertM6z-u^ . 
Jupiter — Disi'Jupxf op-usoWi 
TsRra— Dist-TerJratt-«u6-£oieib 
Vsnus — Dist-VeM-rfof-/M/i . . 



181.141,465 
88.810,500 

447.667,000 
86.061,806 
62.248,667 



90 MEMORIA TBGHNICA. 

£QgluhMik& 

TERra^Dis-Ter/^ 54.000,000 

Veous— Dista^Ve^ott-snau^A dd.096,000 

3. The QuANtity of matter in the heavenly bodies is in 

the proportions following : 

TERra-*Quan-Tera . . • • 1 

LuNa — Quan-Lun,re< OfV 

Ju Piter — Quan-Jupsj^ 60 

Saturu — Quan-SatureA,ro 28^ 

Sol — Quan-Sol«au-«ity 66|690 

4. The weight (PoNdus) of bodies on the surface of 



• 



Saturu — Pon-Sdturtt^« 536 

LuNa — P-Lunm 630 

Jupiter — Pon-JuA;zo,re 804} 

TERra— Pon-TeraduA,re l,258j| 

Sol— Pon-SolasM 10,000 

5. The DENsities of the same. 

Sol— Den-Solo^ 100 

LuNa — Den-Luno2^ 700 

TERra— Den-Terfe?p 387 

SAturn — Den-Sa^ • • 60 

Jupiter — Den-Jups 76 

N. B, Mr« Whiston supposes the Sun's parallax to be 
32''. Dr. Derham (with Cassini) 9 sec. and a half. 

The Memorial Lines. 

1. IjM'didMiy M6rc6-depap, Mar-deA6(m, Ter-diaA^6, 
Ju'dlC'led, Ve-donoft, Sa-dot-ne/, Sol'dif ouf-'dzy, 

2. Dista-Sat2^'i-^zM, D'lsUM^rke'dodtk, Dist-Mere2« 

otUeth, 
DlsUJu^ideiz'Uketh, Dis-Ter2om. Dista-Ve<ott*29iatt^ 



ASTRONOMICA. 91 

3. Quan-Tera, Quaii-Lua,r6£, Quan-Jupsy, Quan- 

Sature^,ro, 
QudLU'SolsaU'Sny, 

4. Pon'Situvuts, P-Lunm, Pon-Ju^«o,re, Pon-Ts> 

aduk,re, 
PoU'Solazth, 

5. Den-Sola^, Den-Lunot^, Den-Ter/eip, DeD-Sa«y, 

Deu-Ju/>«. 



TABLE III. 

THE PERIODICAL TIMES OF THE R-EVOLUTIONS OF EACH 
PLANET ABOUT THE SUN ARE AS FOLLOW : 

MsRCury in 88 ^ Z' 3 months. 

Venus 224 /days, \ 7 ^ months. 

Mars 687 V or < 2 years, 

Jupiter 4,333 i about J 12 years. 

SATurn ..... .10,759^ V 30 years. 

The Memorial Lines, 

Merc-reiA» Sat-razptm, Msrs-raukoi, Ven-recto, Jup-ro«*, 
Merc-reyo-menf, Ve-r-mep-A, Mars-r-anc?, Jup-r-an^e, 
Sat-r-an^y. 

N, B, Men vel me MennbuSf an Annis, h half. 

The DiSTance of the Earth from the Sun being divided 
into ten parts, or Decimals, the distance of MERcury from 
the Sun will be as 4 of them, of Venus as 6, of Mars 
as 16^ of Jupiter as 52, of Saturn as 95. 

The Memorial Line. 
Ter-distoiSy M^ro, Ven«, Marsa/, Jupiter2e, Satumou/. 



92 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

The Sun is distant from the Earth 21,600 SEMldiameter 
of the EarthsB6.051,396 miles. 

The Moon 60^ semidiameterss 239,952 miles 

The Memorial Lines, 

Dist-Sol-s^micfa-£2^z = kau-zub- touk. — 7- 
Dista-Lun-sem«^,ro= din^nud. 

The motion of the Sun round its axis is performed in 
25 days and 6 hours — So\'Xdu,ro. The motion of Jupiter 
round its axis is performed in 9 hours 56 minutes — Ju-x- 
n,us: that of the Earth in 24 hours; so that the Motion 
of the Sun round its axis is at the rate of 4,262 miles an 
hour — Sol-myese; the Motion of Jupiter round its axis 
38,159 miles an hour — Ju-mieibun : the Motion of the 
Earth round its axis is 1,043 miles an hour — Tev-mdzfi, 

The Memorial Line, 
Sol'infese, Jvt-mteHnun, Ter-mdzfi, S61-x(iu,ro, Ju-xn,ii«. 

The apparent diameter of the Sun in summer (iBsTATe 
Solis Diameter) is 31 M-inutes 40 S-econds— JSstat-So- 
di-mib-soz. 

In winter (HTEme) 32 M-inutes 47 S-econds — 
. hye-mtc^-sop. 

If the Sun is supposed to go round the Earth, its diurnal 
motion will be 22.528,366 M-iles in an Hour — Sol-m- 
hode^lek'taus. 

The Memorial Line. 

iEstat-So-di-mi6-soz, hye-mW-sop; Sol-m-hoe2e-/eA- 

taus. 

The three CoMets, whose periods were thought to have 
been dbcovered. Derham's Astro-Theology, p. 56. 

That ( 16821 calculated to r 75 1 and to C 1758 

which < 1661 V perform its < 129 V appear < 1789 
appeared (. 1680 ) revolution in ( 575 ) again (. 2255 

• 

i^omske-pu siub-adou sky-hil: puk pein & eelu. 



ASTRONOMICA ET CHR0N0L06ICA. 99 

The Memorial Lines for all the Table, 

Merc-rct^, Sat-raspun, Mars-rate^oi, Ven-redo, Jup-ro^/f, 
Merc- revo- men/, Ve-r-mej^A, Mars-r-an<f, Jup-r-au^, 

Sat-r-anfy. 
Ter-disUiz, Mero, Vent, Marsa/, Jupiter /e, Saturnou/. 
Dist- Sul*s^mida-<3f z =s kau-zub- touk, Lu nxjf ,ro = din-nud, 
Sol-m/e«e, Ju-m/ei6ten, Ter-m^z/S, S61-xdtt,ro, Ju-xn,iM. 
^stat-So-di-iDi6.so;;, hye-mld-sop; Sol-m-hode-/eA- 

Comshe^fU saih-adou shy-loil: puk pein & eelu* 



TABLE IV. 

CHRONOLOOIGAL NOTES. 

d. h. m. 8i tlL 

Solar month (M ENsis SoLARis) con- 
sists of— Men-Solar/2(-%-c2(m . 30 10 29 
Lunar SYNODal month — Synods 

be-ff't 29 12 44 S 

Lunar PERiodical month — Men- 

pericfoi-p-o* 27 7 43 

The cycle of the Moon less (CtcIus 

Lunaris MiNor) than 19 Julian 

years — Cyc-Lu-min-ha-doi-to-ZZ 1 27 31 55 
[This difference arises to a whole 

day, and consequently throws the 

new moons back a whole day in 

312 years (ANNis)— Annfad.] 
The tropical or natural solar year 

less than the Julian (Annus Tro- 

picus MiNor JuLiano)llM-inutes 

— ^Trop-min-juli-ma6 ; and con- 
sequently the equinoxes happen a 

day sooner^in 130 years — biz. . 11 
'^he lunar year (LuNaris Anuus) — 

Hun-inHo-hei-mok 354 8 48 



94 MBMORIA TEGHNICA. 

d. b. m. a. th. 

The £pACt--£paca0*ci^6 ... 10 21 100 

The solar year (SoLaris Andus) — 

S61-ani«i^/-on ....... 365 5 49 

Between the VERNal and AuTum- 
nal equinox — Yern-autaJb-haA- 
miz 186 18 30 

Between the AuTUMnal and VER- 
Nal equinox — Autum-vem^otA;- 
ab-an 178 11 19 

The METonic period was invented by Meto, in the 
year before Christ 430> consisting of 19 years — Metfiz- 
bau. 

The CALiPpic period was invented by Calippus, in the 
year before Christ 330, consisting of 76 years — Calipito-oi«. 

The Dionysian period was invented by Dionysius £xi- 
guus. An. Dom. 527, consisting of 532 years — jyiolep^lid. 

The JuLian period was invented by Joseph ScALiger, 
consisting of 7,980 years — J(il-Scalip6»%. 

The vulgar year of Christ was in the fourth of the 
indiction, the tenth in the cycle of the Sun, the second 
of the cycle of the Moon. 

Indie, erat quarto, decimo Sol, Luna secundo. 



TO FIND THE YEAR OF THE JULIAN PERIOD, THE YEARS OF 
THE OTHER CYCLES BEING GIVEN. 

Multiply the cycle of the Sun into 4845 — Sol in okoL 

the cycle of the Moon into 4200 — Itunfeg. 

^the In Diction into 6916 — Indic^ncu. 

Divide the PRODUct by 7980 — .Dlv-produpott%. 
The remainder is the year. 

The Sunday letters which begin every month are fre- 
quently known by the two English verses. 

At Dover dwells George Brown, &c, (see p. 182.) 



ASTRONOMIGA ET CHRONOL06ICA. 95 

Bu^. perhaps they may be more readily remembered by 
trie following line, which lays the reader under no neces- 
sity of counting the order of the words before he can tell 
which month they answer to, every month ending with 
vh3 letter which belongs to the iirst day of it. 

Ja Td Mid Apri^ May6 June Jul^ Aiic Sef Octa 
Nov^rf De/. 

MARch, MAy, JuLy, October, have Nones on the 7th 
day, and the loes on the 15th — Mar-Ma- Jul-Oc=Nop- 
IdaL The rest (CjExeri) on the 5th and 13th — Caet/-a^ 

April, JuNe, SEptember, and November, have thirty 
(TRiGiNTa) days — Ap-J(in-Se-No=trigint. 

The Memorial Line, 

Mar-Md-Jul-Oc=Nop-Ida/, Cddtl-at: Ap-Jun-Se-No 
=trigint. 

In a year (Anuo) are 365 Days, 8765 Hours, 525,949 
MiNutes, 31.556,937 SEConds. 

An = D'Uaul^ Horeipaul^' Minlel'non= Secta-ltu-outoi, 

The motion of the firmament, or fixed stars, is 50'' in 
a year, or a degree in 72 years. According to which rate 
the motion (called the pLATOnic year) is accomplished 
in 25,920 years — An-Plato=dMnez. 

The twelve signs : ARies, TAurus, GEmini, CANcer, 
LEO,ViRgo, LiBra, ScoRpio, SAGittarius, CAPRicorn, 
AguARius, Pisces. 

Ar-Ta-Ge, Can-Leo-Vir, Lib-Sc6r-Sagi, Capric-Aqudr - 
Pis. 

The Memorial Lines for all the Table, 

Men-Solart^-%-c2ou, Synod^n-be-ff-t, Men-peridoi-p^t, 
Cyc-Lu-miu-ha-cfoi-^a-//, [AnntodJ, Trop-min-juli-ma6, 
bizp 



96 MEMORIA TBGHNIGA. 

Lun-dntfo-het-moA, Epaca«-dci-6, S61-aDistf-/-<m9 
Yern-autaAf-haA-mix, Autum-yern6olA-a6-an. 



MetfiZ'boUf Calipi/z-ow, Dioiep^lid, JdUScalipduky, 

Indic, erat quarto, decimo Sol, Luna secundo, 

Sol in okol, iMufeg, Indic«uM, Dly-produpo«i(y. 

)a Td Mid Aprig May6 Jane Jul^ Aiic Sef Octa 

Nov^rf De/. 
Mar-Ma-JuUOc=Nqp-Ida/, CsetZ-af: Ap-JCin-Se-No 

satrigint. 
An = Ditou/B Horetpav/s Mini6^fioii= Secto*/ics^m/ot« 
A n^Plato ^dunez, 
Ar-Ta^-Oey Can^Leo-Vir, Lib-Sc6r*Sagiy Caprk-Aqa&r- 

Ptf. 



PONDERA, NUMMI, MENSUR/E. 



SECTION V. 

THE APPLICATION OF THIS ART TO COINS^ HEIGHTS, 

AND MEASURES, 

The beginning of the words is composed of the initial 
letters; thus At-ta stands for ATtic TAlent; He-t for 
HEbrew T-alent ; A-d for A-ttic D-rachm ; Al-d for 
ALexandrian D-rachm ; He-to for Hebrew Talent of gold 
(He-t standing for HEbrew T-alent, as before, and o for 
Or, or gold) ; Ro-1 for Roman L-ibra, Den for DENarius, 
Shek for ShekcI, 6re-f for GREcian F-oot, He-c for 
HEbrew C-ubit, Ro-fs^ for Roman F-oot square, &c. 

The italic endings of the words represent the number 
of pounds, shillings, and pence, which are separated from 
each other by hyphens, or else signified by the roman letters 
1. s. d. The double lines denote equality: thus A-m= 
dra^ = ^-et-n, signifies that an A-ttic M-ina, which is 
equal to 100 DRachms, was 3 pounds 8 shillings and 9 
pence. The letters, though separated, are to be pro- 
nounced together; as Nei-n, tein. The reader is to be 
reminded here that re signifies ^, ro ^, &c. according to 
the general rule, page 4. But note, that instead of the 
fraction re, the letter h b sometimes used for Half, as 
oikbemh^ljdl^l, sc. 7,812 pounds 10 shillings. 

F 



98 MfiMORIA TBCHNIGA. 



TABLE I. 

HEBREW, ATTIC> BABYLONISH, ALEXANDRIAN, AND ROHAN 

MONET.* 

1. a. d. 

An ATtic TAlent=60 M-inas — At-ta= 

mauz^ezdu^su 206 5 

An A-ttic M-ina=100 DRachms — ^A-m^ 

drtng^t-ei-n 380 

A HEbrew T-alent=:50 Minas = 3000 

SHekels — H€-tssm\ly=shith=fuz . . 450 
A HEbrew M-ina =60 Snekels — He-m= 

8hauz-=\ou 900 

A BAbylonian T-alent— Ba-t=e^z-6e-s . 240 12 6 
A BAbylonian T-alent of Gold — Ba-to=s 

teilz 3850 

An A-ttic T-alent of Gold— A-to=/i^ . 3300 
A HEbrew T-alent of Gold— He-to=pe^ . 7200 
An A-ttic D-rachm — A-d=dei,ro ... 008^ 
A Hebrew D-rachm — He-d=dcm ... 009 
A Roman L-ibra=>96 D-enarii — Ro-l = 

dous^li 300 

f A Roman TAient=»72 LiBrs — R6m-ta= 

\ihoid=<ias 216 

An ALexandrian DRACHm — Al-drach== 

sa-ds 016 

An ItaHc Mina — Ita-mi=U .... 300 
A SHBKel=2 Bskas-- Shek=b^£;=8t . . 3 
A Roman D-enariusML Sssterces — R6-d 

=seso=doi,re 7j| 

A Sssterce, ^ of a Denarius, «c. LLS. 

(vuigo HS.) duo asses cum semisse — 

Ses ^ da-ft,re, a penny tbree farthings 

and half a farthing IJ 

♦ See the Preface to Dr. Prideaux's Connexion. * 

t Others make a Roman TALents6000 D-eQarli=s84* Sister 
Uum8=:=187/. lOf.— Tal=DatttA=S6sdb=lae»p-A. 



PONDERA) NUMMI, MENSURiE. 99 

1. •. d. 

Sestertium, or 1000 S-esterces* — Sath = 

p-as-t 7 16 3 

Decern Sestertium, 10,000 Sssterces — Ses- 

bylh=pei-d'8 78 2 G 

Decies Sestertium, or 1,000,000 SESTERces 

— Sesteramssoikbe'h 7812 10 

2 Victoriati— Vid 
4 SEstertii — Se/ 

i\„^r ' /wij \ y 6 OboH — Ob« 
DENanus (7jd.)=<;^o hiBeW^-Uhaz 

20 SBMbellae — Semdy 
.40 Teruncu — ^Terunj^ 

Den (doi,rc)=Virf=Se/^Ob«=Llba2==Semd3p=:Ti»run^. 

The Memorial Lines, 

At'tgi=imauz=sezdU'SU, A-ins=dra^=f-et-n, 'H^-t=mi/^ 

=shitA=/u2i, 
He-m=shaia=late, Ba-t=e6sr-6e-s, BB.-toz=iteilz, A-tos 

tig, He-to=pe^que, 
A-dssdei,ro, Ue-dssdou, Ro-l=d(nM»Ii, R6m-tasslibot<f- 

das, 
Al-drach=ssa-d», Ita-mi=sh, Sheksb^dssi, K6-d=: 

seso=:dot,r6, 
Ses=da-ft,r6, Sath=sp-aS't, Seabythzspet-d'S, Sesteram 

^oikbe-h. 
Den (doi,re)=Vid=Se/==Ob«=Liba«=Semdy=Terunyy. 



* Dr. Arbuthnot makes the SBsterce a penny three farthings, and 
three-fourths of a farthing — Ses^da-U,tro; according to which'a 
S-estertium, or 1000 Sesterces, will be 81, U. 5}^^ — Sath^k-a-lJi; 
Decies SESTertium, or 1,000,000 of Sesterces «> 8072^ 18«. Ad. — 
Senidm'^kppe-sak'do. 

Tal m Dauth <- S^sdo <- \aeip»hfiathmi.a-l'k,Se»tdm s&ype-saft-do. 



F2 



100 IfBlfORIA TEOHNIOA. 



TABLE II. 

UBAtDRES OF LENGTH. 

The method observed in the following tables is, first, 
to g;iye the ancient measures, weights, &c. in the propor- 
tions which they bear to each other ; and then the pro- 
portions which they bear to those of our own country. 
To which I subjoin some tables, by which the reader will 
be enabled to make any calculations of this kind with the 
utmost ease and readiftes8« 

ENGLISH MEASURES OF LENGTH. 

8 FuRlongs — FurA 
320 P-oles— Pirfz 

English MiLe =<? I'H^ YARds-Yarapa«^ 
* ^ 5,280 F-eet — rndeiz 

63,360 iNches — Inautisy 
.190,080 B-arley corns — lianzyem 

Mil =T FurA = Vidz = Ymapauz = Tudeiz = Inautity = 
3anzyeiz, 

MiLe (-8 furlongs) = 6280— Mil =F«cfei«. 
FuRlong(=40 poles) = 660— Fur=F«aMis. 
PoLe (=:6J yards) = 16J— Pol=:FiM,re. 
CuBit (=2 spans) = l|— Cub=Fa,re. 
FAThom (=2 yards) = 6— Fat=FaM. 

Mil=Fttdctz, Fur=F«attz, Pol=Fa«,re, Cub=Fa,r« 
Fat=FaM. 

GRECIAN MEASURES OF LENGTH. 

( 8 Sra-aco— 2rai 
mX'UJv = { 800 'Opy'Vial—*OoH.g 
1 4800 n6h'eQ--J16^/eig 

lIovQ=4 Aci»p-a=16 A^-v>.oc« 



PONDERA, NUMMI9 MENSUR^. 101 

M/X = 2SrdA =*Opeig = HdSfeig. Ili^ = SiriOo^ie. Uovg =» 
Ab;po=AaJcra«. 

mX'ioy (=8 a-A^to) = 4800- WX=n6^feig 

*^Tah'Ov (=100 'Opyvial = 600- -2ra^t=naii^ 
•Opy-vto (=4 UIix'^iq) = G— •0/iy=nate 

UnX'VQ (=2 S7ri0a/iioi) = 24— n^X=^^ 

Ilvywy (=2 A/xa*) = 20— nuyaiv=Acz 

livy-fiif (=1J 27ri0op/ = 18— nuy=Aaik 

IIIovc (=4 ^&pa) = 16— noi/c=Aojcra« 

SflriOo-/!^ (=3 Awpo) = 12 — S)rt0o=Aad 

•OpO-oawpov = 11— •Op9=Aa6 

A«x-oc = 10 — A/x=AajcAy 

§A(t5-pov = 4 — Aii)=AaiC70 

2Sra^c = naii^ & 'Opy = Uau : Uijx = Aef, Iluy = AaAque 

lIvytl>v=Ae2, 
Hove = Adicras, 2iri6a = Aad, 'Op0 = Aa6, Atx = ^cucby, 

A«i»=Aaicrt>. 



* Galled also A&x^f, from whence came AfavXos, a space of two 
stadia. 

t The Grecian measures, from which the Romans borrowed 
theirs, were comrr.only taken from the members of a human body. 
AtUrvXo. , a finger's breadth ; AwpoK, a hand's breadth, or four 
fingers; Aixas^from the thumb to the middle finger; *OpB6S<iepoyy 
the length of the hand, from the upper part Xo the extremity of the 
longest finger; liirtdafiri, the length of the hand extended, between 
the thumb and the little finger ; Tlovs, the foot=four hands* breadth ; 
n^wf, from the elbow to the extremity of the fingers ; IliryW, 
from the elbow to the second joint of the fingers, or a cubit with 
the fingers inflected; T^vy^lr|^ from the elbow, with the fingers quite 
clasped; *Ofyyvt&, from the extremity of one middle finger to the 
extremity of the other, the arms being extended. 

t The Grecian foot was also, like the Roman, divided into 12 
OifYylai or inches. 

I Auptfv^ the* palm, so called, because gifts are made with the 
hand : called also AoxfJi>h^ from iexofuUf to receive, AoktvXMxm'V 
& noAaurr^. 



102 MEMORIA TECHNIOA. 



MiLliare'= 



ROMAN MEASURES OF LENOTE. 

8 STAdia — StaA 
1000 P-assus— Pa«A 
4000 PALMiPedes — PalmpoM 
5000 P-edes— PuM 
r 4 PALmi MiNores — ^Pal-miao 
Pes == ^12 llNCiae — Uncad 

(, 16 Digit! — Digital 

Mil=StaA=Pa*A=PalmpoM. Pe9=Pal.mino=Digit« 
=Uncarf. 

MiLliare (=8 stadia) = 6000— Mil.rom=Ptt** 
STADium (=125 passus) = 625 — Stadi=P«eZ 
Passus (=4 palmipedes) »= 5 — Pass=Pu 

DiOlTi.* 

+CuBitus (=1} pes = 24— Cub=Digite/ 

PALMipes (=5 palmi) = 20— Palmip=Dez 

tPES (=4 palmi) = 16— Pe8=Da< 

§Palmus (=3 unci«) = 4 — Palm=Do 

llUNcia = 1-i— Un=Da,rc 

Ma-rom=Ptt*A, 8tadi-P«e/, Pass=P«: Cub=^Digit^, 

Palmip=Dc2f, 
Pe8=Da<, Palm=Do, Un=Da,re. 

JEWISH MEASURES OF LENGTH. 

2 SABbATh-days' journeys — Sibate 
MiLe = ^ 10 Sxadia— Staz 

4000 Cubits — Cubito^A 
2 Spans the greater 

r«tTn;f— J ^ Spans the less 
i.UBit- < 6 Palms— Palmait 




> — Spaiie*i 
24 Digits — Digitef 



* Some divide the Digitus into 4 Grana* 

t Some use Ulna for Cubitus, Pliny takes them for different 
measures ; his Ulna answers to the Greek 'Opyvik. 

X Pes was divided, as .the As, into 13 parts ; hence Dextans = 
10 inches, Dodrans = 9 inches, &c. 

§ Called Palmus minor, to distingpiish it from a greater, which 
some authors make equal to 12 digits, 

II Called sometimes PoUex. 



PONDERA^ NUMMIy MENSURifi. 108 

Cttbs:SpaDe»i=Palmatt=Digite/'. Mil=Sabate=Sta2r= 
Coth. 

Cubits. 
Eastern MiLe (=10 stadia) = 4000— Mil=Co*A 
SxADium = 400 — Stad=Cubito^ 

*ScH(ENus, or Ckebal * = 80 — Schodn=eiz 

ARAbian PoLe = 8 — Ara-poI=A 

EzEkiel's REEd, or Kaneh = 6 — £ze-ree=» 

FATHom = 4— Fath=o 

Digits. 
Crsit, or Ammah = 24 — Cub^Digitc/" 

f Span, or 2k7'eth = 12— Spaa=Dad 

Palm, or Tophach = 4— Palm=Do 

Mi\=Coth, 



Stad = Cubito^, Sch(En = ci2, Ara-pol = ^, Eze-ree«s, 

Fath=o; SpaQ=Dac2, 
Cub=Digitc/, Palm-Do; Para=MiU. 

N. B. The PARAsang is a Persian measure, consisting 
of 30 stadia=3 MiLes — Para=Mik. 

A day's journey is an uncertain measure, but amongst 
the Jews was generally reckoned 24 miles. 

The Memorial Lines, 

Mil = FurA = Pirfz = Yaropaus = Vvdeiz = luautisy =* 

'Ranzyeiz, 
Mil = FMcfei5f, Fur = F«aMz, Pol = Fa«,re, Cub = Fa, re, 

Fat=FaM. 
l/LfX=ln-dk=*0peig=IL6^feig, lIflx=^iB(it^e. Tiovc=^i!fpo 

=Aajcr<M, 
Sro^t=nati^&'Ooy=naM; Tlfix=^cf, nvy=Aa^que Uvyufv 

=Ae2, 
Tlovs=AdKTa8, ^ida=^adf *OpO=Aab, Atx=AaK6y, A45= 

Aam-o. 
Mil=StaA=PaM=PalmpofA, Pes=Pal-mino=Digita«=a 

Uncad. 



* Called also Pami. 

t There is likewise another word, Gomed, which the LXX, 
render :irt0afi'^. 



104 



MEMORIA TEGHNIGA. 



Mil-rom==P«lA, Stadi=P«c/, Pass=Pi«; Cab=Digit«/, 

Palmfp^Dez, 

Pe8=Da«, Palm=Do, Un=Da,re. 

Cub=Spaiie-t=Paliiiaic=Digitef. Mil=S&bate=Sta«s 

Coth. 

Mil=Co*A, 

Stad = Cubito^, Scboen = e»2» Ara-pol = A, £2e-ree = f, 

Fath=o.* Span=Dac{, 
Cub=Digite/, Palni=Do; Para=MiU. 



TABLE III. 

THE PROPORTION OF THE FOREGOING MEASURES TO ENGLISH 



MEASURES. 



GREcian D-igit — Gr6-d=,pMfo • 
Romau D-igit — ^Ro'd=,peldu . 
*JEwish D-igit — Jew-d=,fiad • 

GREcian F-oot — Gre- f=a,zypdou 
Ho man F-oot — Ro-f=,iiaup 
HEbrew G-ubit — H6-c=a,ie/' . 
GREcian C-ubit — Gi'e-c=a,ia2ftt7 
Roman C-ubit — Ro-c=6,o(rtt . 

GREcian Foot — GTec-{o=be,zeipu 
RoMan F-oot — Ttom-i=ab,syf . 
Hfibrew C-ubit — lie-c=dajteik 
GREcian C-ubit— Gre-c=6et,6t6 
Roman C-ubit — 'Ro'C=boiJfy8 • 

fGREcian M-iXes—Gre-m^, pautzoun 



In. decimals. 

. -75546875 
. '72525 
. -912 

Feet decimals. 

. 1 •0072»f 

. -967 

. 1 -824 

. 1 -510935 

. 1 -4505 

In. decimals. 

, 12 0875 
. 11 -604 
. 21 -888 
. 18 -13125 
. 17 -406 

Eng. Miles, decimals. 

. -763099 



* In reducing the Jewish Measures. I hare followed Bishop 
Cumberland, who makes the cubit = 21*888 inches. Dr. Arbuth- 
not thinks it plain that there were two sorts of cubits, the sacred 
one and the profane or common one ; the former exceeding the 
latter by a hand's breadth, or three inches. The profane cubit he 
makes equal to 17*82 inches ; the sacred one = 20*70 inches. 

t Dr. Arbuthnot makes the Grecian mile equal to 805,8} English 
paees ; which, agreeably to my own method, I have here reduced- 



1 -3817 
-093687^ 
-114465 
-13817 



PONDERA, NUMMI, MENSURiE. 105 

•n »«• .1 Tfc Eng. Miles, decimals. 

KOMan M-ile — Rom-in=, na//>an ... •916719 
HsBrew MiLe— Heb-mil=a,^<?t^ot . 
GREciaD STadium — Gre'St= fZoutleip 
Roman STadium — ^o-st=,bafo8 , 
HEbrew STadium — He-st=,6iA . . 

The Memorial Lines, 

Gr6-d=,pttfo, Ro'd=,p€ldu, JeW'd=,nad: Ro-f=,natM>, 
Gre-f =a,zypd(m, 

Eo-c=6,ofeM, He-c=a,Acf, Gre-c=a,fe«ni/ ; Grec-fo= 
be,zeipu, 

'Rom-i=ab'8ijf: Gre-m=,paMte, B>om'm=, nalpan, Heb- 

mi\=a,teibii: 
.He-c-=da-A:eiA, Ro-c=6oi^«, Gre-c=^i-W6: Ro-st= 

fbafos, Jle'St=,bik, 
Gre'3t=, zoutleip, 



TABLE IV. 

SUPERFICIAL MEASURES. 

English Acre — Ac=s-fo//aii« 43560 'GO 

B-ood (=40 poles) — B,=azkouz .... 10890 -00 
PoLe — Pol=dotd,cZ 272 '25 

A A -mr t Sq. YARds. 

Acre — Ac=i aro^oz 4840 

■■> o -n Tfc i. Sq. Feet decimals. 

Koman ^»9uare F-oot— Ro-fg=ni7 ... -935089 
GREcian Sq. F-oot — Gve'iq=d'Zafaut8 . . 1 -0146365 
IlEbrew Sgu. Cubit— He-C5=t,f^«iOM . . 3 -326976 

Ju6erum=R-oods 2, P-oles 18, F-eet 250-05— Juff= 

Ji6-Fak'Vely-zu ^ 

mjO-pov^V-oles 36, F-eet 245— nXi0=Pi«-Fc/o/ 

to 0-763099 of a mile. Yet, according to his own computation 
vhich makes *Opyviic=6 feet 0*625 inches, or, which is the same' 
6-04p375 feet, lirdZioy (=100 *OpyvioA) will be 604*375 feet, and 
MiXMv (=8 2T<te«a) will be 4836 feet, exactly equal to the numb«r 
of English feet in a Roman mile s= 0*916719 of a mile. 

F3 



106 MBMORIA TBCHNICA, 

•Egyptian ''Af)ov-pa=R-oods 3, P-oles 2, F-eet 55^ — 
" Af)ov=Ri-Pe- Ftt/,ro. 

Eng. Acres, decimals. 

Juoerum— Jug=,«aAi2o *618240 

n\ie-poy—n\ie=,€ty8t O '230632 

Egyptian *'Af>ovp-a—*'Af>ovf>=',OM^ .... '763768 

Greek Sq. Feet Eng. Sq. F. deciro. 

UXiOpoy = 10,000 = 10,146 '3650 

"Apovpa i UXiSpov = 6,000 = 6,073 '1826 

Egyptian "AfMwpa = 10,000 Squ. Cub. = 3^,269 '7600 

Rom. Sq. Feet. Sq. F. decim. 

+Actus minimus 120 x 40 = 4,800 = 4,488 -4272 

Actus Quadratus 120 x 120 = 14,400 = 13,466 '2816 

Clima 60x60 » 3,600 = 3,366 -3204 

Versus 100x100 = 10,000 = 9,350 '8900 

tJugerum=2 Actus Quad. = 28,800 = 26,930 '6632 

Uncta -iV of the Jugerum » 2,400 = 2,244 -2136 

The Memorial Lines. 

Ac=s-fotlauZf 'R=azk<mZf Pol=ctoirf,c/; Ac=YaroAozque; 

Gre-fq^dtZafautSf lR>o»iq^nil, He-c^==»,^^«noM. 

Jug=R^-PaA-Fc/y,au, TSXid^VU-Vdol, "Afwv^Rt-Pe- 

Ftt/,ro. 
Jug=^ftiA<fo, IIXe6=,6ty«^, "Apovp^fOist. 



TABLE V. 

MEASURES OF CAPACITY. 



Tun 



ENGLISH WINE MEASURE. 

2 B-uts— Be 

Puncheons — Put 
Hogsheads — Ho/* 
TiERces — Tiero 




* The GreciB.n'' Apovpa was | of the U\40pov. 
t Aetng is the leng^th of one furrow, so far as a plough goes 
before it turns, in length 190 feet. 
t The Jui^feniiii was diTided, like the As, into twelve parts. 



PONDERA, NUMMI; MENSUR^. 107 

8 BARrels — BarA 
14 R-undlets— Ra/ 
Tun=^ 252 GalIods — Gsldud 
2,016 Pints— Pirf«<M 
58,212 Solid iNches — Inukdad 

Tun=Be=Pu*=Ho/=Tiers=BarA=R«/=GaWtM£=Pirf. 
za8=lnukdad. 



ENGLISH CORN MEASURE. 

QuARter=8 Bushels — Quar^BusA; 

C 4 PEcks — Peco 
BusHel = -J 8 GalIods — Galk 

(.64PiNts — Pin«o 

Bush=Peco=GalA=Piii«o; Quar==BusA. 

Cubic Inches. 

Gallod of W-ine — Gi\\'W=€ta 231 

♦GalIod of C-orn — Gal-c=doid,ro 272J 

PiNt DRy measure — Piii-dr=t/',nd .... 34^ 

PiNt LIQUID measure — Pin-liquid=c^,p*ei . . 28|- 
TT^^ u J (63 GalIods — Galsi 
Ho6shead= { 504 PiNts-Piniiw 

G41I-w==€te, Ga,Uc=doid,ro, Piii-dr=i/',nd, Pin-liquid= 

ek,prei, 
Hog=Gal«t=PiD^2;o. 



GRECIAN MEASURES OF CAPACITY. 



={ 



12 X'6ec—X6d 
Mcr-jtwyr^C = -J 72 tSi-iarai — tBioid 

144 Ko7-vX-ai — KorvKaff 
C 48 Xoiv-dcec — Xoivok 
Mi^'ifiyog^K 12 tSUtrr-ai — lEliarpe 

(, 144 KorvX-ai — KorvXaff 



* This is the common receiTod content of a com gallon, and 
according to which the following computations are made ; but 
strictly, by Act of Parliament, the corn gallon contains but 268*8 
cubic inchss. By experiment It appears also, that the standard 
-wine gallon doth contain but 824 cubic inches. — See Ward's Ma- 
thematician's Guide, Part I. Chap. 8. 



108 MEMORIA TECHNIGA. 

M€r=X6d=lBloid=KoTv\aff, Mca=^XoiyoA=W€Vrpeque=» 
KorifXaff, 

2 KoTv\'€u — KorvXe 
8 'OJu-ZJa^a— Ofvife 
XcW-ijc= < 12 Kua0-oi— Kua0^ 

48 Mvorp-o — Mvorpo^ 
120 KoxK'Mpia--KiyxXadz 

#S?€ar=KorvXe=Kox^«^z=*0£vA=Kvo66cque=Mv(rrf)oA. 

•M£r-f)i;r»)c 1. (=12 \6ee) = 72— M€r=*€Voirf 

Xwc 1. (=12 KorwXoi = 6—XovQ=lB:au 

MiBifi-yoQ d. = 72— M£ai/x=XOTrf 

XoIv-i4 d. = IJ — Xoiv=lEla,re 

taHoT'tiQ (=12 Kva6oi) = 48— X6(rr=Mv(Trf)oA 

Korv-\i/ (=6 KuoOoi) = 24— Kor6=]VIc/ 

'0{v/3-o^v (=3 KcJt^oi) = 6— '0{v/3=Matt 

Kva-Coc (=5 X^/ioi) = 4— Kvo=Mo 

KcJyx-iy (=6 KoxXtapca) = 2 — K<5yx-Mc 

'M.£T=lS!i(rToidf XovQ=^lSiau, Midifi=tSi(dd, Xoiy=lS!a,re. 
Siar^Mvarpok, Korv=Me/, 'Ofu/}=Ma«, Kva=Mo, Kd^^x 
=Mc. 

ROMAN MEASURES OF CAPACITY. 



{ 

^ 2 HEMlNae— Jlemme 
\ 4 QuARTARii — Quartarf 
^ ' ft ArRTAhiila — AcGtAk 

I 



20 AMPHorae — Amphez 
CuLeus « "{40 URNae— Urnoz 

860 CoNGii — Congbauz 
2 Heminsb— Hemiue 



SEXTarius == < • 8 AcETAbula — AcetaA 

12 Cyathi — Cyath6c 
48 LiGuLae — higlok 



Cul=Amphe2=Urnoz=Cong6att«. 

8ext=Uemine=Quartar/*=Aceta^=Cyath6eque=LigloA 



* ('ailed also *kfupop^h$, and KiZos, 

N. B. I. denotes measures for liquid things, d. meaBOies for dry 
things ; the rest are used as measures for both. 



PONDERA, NOMMI^ MENSURiE. 109 

SBXTariu 

CuLeus 1. (^20 Amphorte) = 960 — Cul=Sex7tau2 

AMPHora 1. (=2 Urnae) «= 48 — Amph=SoAr 

IJRNa I. (=4 Congii) = 24— Urn=Sextc/* 

CoNGlus 1. = 6 — Congi=Saic 

MoDius d. (=2 Setni-modii) = 16— Mod=Sa» 

LlOULse. 

SsxTarius (=2 Heminse) = 43 — Sext=Ligu]oil 

HsMlna (=2 Quartarii) = 24 — Hemi=I^ 

QuARTarius (=2 Acetabula) = 12 — Quart=Lac{ 

AcETABulum (=1J Cyathus) = 6 — Acetab=Lau 

Cyathus = 4— Cyath=Lo 

Cul=Sexnai£2;, Amph=SoA, Urn=Sexte/*, Congi=Sati, 

Mod=Sa«. 
Sext=Ligulo^, Hemi=L6/*, QuBit=had, Acetab=Latiy 

Cyath=Lo. 

JEWISH KEASURES OP CAPACITT. 

3 SEAhs— Sea^ 
6 HiNs — Hin« 
10 Omers — Omeroz 
Bath == ^^ 18 C-abs— Caifc 
72 Logs — Logpe 
96 Caphs — Caphnatf 
330 Gachals— GachaUtx 

Bath=Sea*=Hin«=Oineraz=CaA=Logpe=Caphnatt=> 
Gachahiz. 

Baths or EPHahai 

CHOMer or Coron = 10 — Chom=Bath-Epha2; 
LETech d. = 5 — Let=£phtt 

Cabs. 
Bath or EPHah = 18— Bath-Eph=CabaA 
HiN 1. i of Seah = 3— Hin=Cab£ 
SEAh = 6 — Sea=Cab« 

The HiN was=12 L-ogs=16 C-aphs 1. — Hin=Lad=Ca#. 
Cab=20 G-achals d. — Cab=Ge2f. 
Omer or Gomer was a dry measure. 



no MEMORIA TEGHNtCA. 

Chom = Bath-£phaz, Let = Ephu, Bath-£ph = Cabak, 

Hin=Cabi, Sea=Cab«. 
Hin=Lad=Ca«, Cab=6e«. 

The Memorial Lines* 

Tun=Be=Pu*=Ho/=Tier«=BarJfc=Ra/=GaWttd=Pid- 

zcLs=lnukdad. 
Bush=Peco=GaU=Pin«o; Quar=^BusA: Hog=GraI«= 

Pin^zo. ^ 

Gall-w=efa, 6al-c=dwc?,ro, Pin-dr=tf,rid, Pin-liquid= 

ek,prei. 
Mer=Xdd=lB!oid=Kjorv\aff, M£5=Xoivo^=X£0'rpcque= 

KoTvXaff. 
5<£Vr=KorvXc=KoxXacfa='O£vA=Kya06eque=Mu(Trpo^. 
Mer— IS ioToid, Xove==tSSau, MihifjL=tB!oid, Xoiy=iB}a,re. 
SSii<rr=Uv<rTpoky KoTv=Mef, 'Oivj3=Ma«, Kva=Mo, Koyx 

=Me. 

Cul=Amphe2?=Urno2f=Cong6aM«. 

8ext=Hemine=Quartar/*=Aceta^=Cyath6eque=LigloA. 
Cul=Sexmatiz, Amph^Soifc, Urn=Sextc/*, Coiigi=Sa«, 

lVIod=Sa«. 
Sext=LiguloA, Hemi-L<^, Quart=Lad, Acetab=^Lau, 

Cyath=Lo. 
Batb=Seaf=Hin»'='Oinera»=:CaA=Logpe=Capb9uztt= 

Gachakiiff. 
Chom = Bath- Epbaz, Let = Ephu, Bath-Eph == CabaA:, 

Hln=Cabt, Sea=Cab5. 
ilin—had=Ca8, Cab==Gcz. 



TABLE VL 

MEASURES OF CAPACITY REDUCED TO ENGLISH MEASURES* 

A PiNt DRV = 34-0312 J ri u- • u 
A PiNt LIQUID = 28-876 } ^"^'^ ^"^^^ 

— Pin-dr=i/*,«i6e, Pin-liquid =e^,Aot7. 



PONDERA^ NUMMI^ MJBNSURJB. Ill 

DRT. 

pints. In. decim 

•Mi^i/xy-oc — 'M.idifAy=oiz't 70 3 '501 

MoDius — Modi=6att-p Ift 7 '6S 

£PHah — Eph—ub-ad 61 12 -107 

tSioT-riQ — }SiiaT—zAt 33 'ISS 

SextarIus — Sextar=a 1 o •48 

Cab — C9h=d^k 2 28 '432 

LIQUID. 

Pints. In. dectm. 

fMfrp-ijr^c — M£rf>=etW-an 82 19 '626 

AMphora — Am=t(p-a;s 67 10 '66 

JBath — Bath=«2(-6u 60 15 -2 

iBiiffT-ris — ISii(rr==a-f 1 4 '283 

SEXTarius — Sext=a-tt 1 5 '636 

jLoG— Log=2;-rfo 9 24 '2736 

Bush, decimals. 

MiC'ifivoG — Mih=a,zous 1 '09612 

MoDius — Mod=,elild *253525 

Chrmer }— %*^=»%^'» -802433 

Gall, decimals. 

Mcrp-ijr^C — M£Tp=aZftil 10 '335 

AMPHora — Amph=oi,apad 7 -1712 

Bath — Bath^p^/au/ 7 •6668 

CoNgius — Con=,kousteil '896386 

Pints, decimals. 

SiffT-riQ liquid — tS!i<Tr=a,bok 1 -1483 

JBii'<n"q^ dry — lB!i=%,nmf . , '97447 



• Besides the Attic Medimnus, there was a Medimnus Ge^gietu, 
equal to 6 Roman Modiu 

t The Metretes of Syria wwj equal to the Roman Congiusz=z 
7*171 pints, 

X The Jewish measures are Uere, according to Bishop Cumber- 
land, from the Rabbins : but Bishop Hooper, from Josephus, 
makes the Jewish Bath equal to the Attic Merprrr^s, and conse- 
quently the Log equal to the U^trrris. Dr. Arbuthnot has given 
us tables according to both, but seems to prefer Bishop Hooper's 
account to the other. 



118 MBMORIA TECHNICA, 

P^ata. decimala, 

SEXTarius liquid— Sext=4,6oufa A .... 1 '19518 

SEXTarius dry— Sext='a,«a/e£ 1 '0148 

Cab liquid— Cab=^wrf 3 -36257 

Cab diy— Cab=e,% 2 -84731 

LoG-Log=z,et/ -84065 

The Memorial Lines. 

Pin-dr=i/,2ite, Pin-liquid=eA-Aoi/. 

miZiiJLv^fnz-t, Modi = 6att.p, Eph = M^ad, iBSityr^Z'it, 

Sextar=a, Cab=rf-eA, ^ c , 

Bath=«y-6tt, M£rp=euf-an, Am=ttp-cu;, tSecrr^a-f, bext 

=a'U, Log=z-£/o, 
Eph=,Aydo<i, Mod=,c/tW, Ui^^ayzom, lB;i==z,noif, Cab 

=6,ifcdpque, 
Amph=o£,a/Mid, Bath=p,tettZ, Mtrp=a«,<£/, tBHtn^afiok, 

Cab=/,Mrf, 
Sext=4,ft<m/aifc, Con=,*oiw*ci7, Sext=a,»a/c», Log=2,ct/. 



TABLE VII. 

WEIGHTS. 

N. B. L or Li stands for Libra or pound, Oz. for ounce, 
Li-t Pound T-roy, L-avoir Pound AvoiRdupois. 
A Pound T-roy =12 Ounces— Li-tssOzcwi 

{8 DRAms — Drik 
24 ScRuples— Sere/ 
20 P-ennyweights— Pea 
480 GRAins— Gra/ifey 

C 16 Ounces— Oza« 
•A Pound Avoirdupois= ^ ^^e DRams— Dre& 

Li-t=sOzad, Oz=sDrdA=Scre/=Pe«=Gra/ifey, L.dv= 
Ozflw, L-dv=Drc/s. 

• According to the proportion laid down by Mr. Greaves, Yiz. 
that the avoirdupois pound is to the troy pound as 176 to 14i: m 
Dr. Arbuthnot's tables it is as 17 to 14s which is a very incon- 
siderable diflference, being but 4rf grains less in the poand. 



PONDERA^ NUMMI^ MBNSURiE. 113 

Grains Troy. 

Pound T-roy — hi-i^ Grupauz ...... 6760 

Ounce Troy — Oz=o^y 480 

DRam — Dr=au2 60 

P£Nn3rweight — Pen=Grc/* 24 

ScRUPle— Scrup=riy 20 

*Pound Avoirdupois — L-&v=ioith 7000 

Ounce Avoirdupois — Oz-By=sotoi,l . , , . 437 '5 

hi-t=Grupauz, Oz=oAy,. Dr=aii2f, Pen=Grc/*, Scrup 

=^dy, L-av=oi/Aque, 
Oz-av=otot,/. 

ANCIENT WEIGHTS. 

A ♦♦;« T- oiz^if-- S ^ M-inas — Mauz 
A-tuc i-aient- | ^^^ DRachms— Draieif/i 

HEbrew T.alent - J ^^^^ SHekels-Shi7A 
HEbrew 1 -alent - ^ ^^ M-anehs-Mat«« 

r 2 BEKahs— Beke 
SHEKel =8 A ^ Zvzas—Zuf 

(. 20 G-erahs— Gc« 

A-i=Mauz=Drauth; He-t=ShiM, He-t-pond=Matuz; 
Shek=Beke=Zu/=Gcz. 

BOKAN AND GRECIAN LESSER WEIGHTS. 

LiBrasc 12 UNciae — Lib=Unac2 

{3 DuELlae— DueU 
4 Siciiici — Sicilo 
6 SExtulae — Ses 
8 DRAchmae — DraA: 
!3 ScRlPtula— Scrip* 
72 GRanea vel Lentes — Groid 

Lib=Unac2, 

Un=Duel<=SiciIo=Se«=DraA, Drach=Scrip/=SilaA= 
Ob«=Grotd. 

• Mr. Ward says, that, by a very nice experiment, he found 
that one pound avoirdupois is equal to 14 ounces 1 1 penny-weights 
and 15| grains troy, which is 6099| grains ; differing but half a 
grain in the pound from Mr. Greaves. — MtUhenuUician^s Gnide, 
put i. chap. 3« 



114 MRMORIA TECHNICA. 

GRAna ^trdpuu 

LlBra AtVpa — Lib=Gra»iiid 6912 

UNCia Ovyy/a — llDC=/ot8 676 

*DRACHMa Apax/i?/ — Drachm=oic{ 72 

ScRUPULum TpcLfifia — Scrupul=^ 24 

fOBOLus "OjSoXoc— Obol=ad 12 

Siliqua Kepariov — Silsry* 4 

Lib = Gra«na(/, Unc = /6w, Drachm =o£rf, Scrupul = e/*, 
Obol=orf, Sil=/. 

DIVISIO A8SI8. 



Unc. 

As 12 

Deudx 11 

DEXtans 10 

DoDrans 9 

Bes 8 

Septunx 7 



Uoc. 

Semis 6 

QuiNcunx 5 

TRiens 4 

QuAdrans 3 

SEXTans 2 

UNcia 1 



As=sdeu-dex — dod-bes — septiin-semi — quin-tri-qua — 
sext-unc. 

The Memorial Lines. 

Li-t=Ozarf, Oz=J)Tik=ScTef=Vez=GT9Lfky, L-dv=Oz<u, 

L-^v=Dre&. 
Li-t=Grtt/Mzicz, Oz=o%, Dr=att«, Pen=Grc/*, Scrup=dy, 

L-av=(wVAque, 

Oz-av=otoi,/. 

A't=Mauz=Drauth : He-t=ShifA, He-t-pond=Mai£« ; 

Shek=Beke=Zu/=Ge2f. 

lAb^JJnadf 

Un=DueU=Sicilo=Se«=DraA, Drach=Scripf=SilaA» 

Ob«=Groid. 



* N.B. The Romans divfacs. .J:;^^ 9unce into 7 denarii as well 
as 8 drachms ; and since they reckoned their denarias equal to the 
Attic drachm, this ivill make the Attic weights ■&- heavier than the 
correspondent Roman weights. 

t The "OiS-oXos was divided into 6 Xa\-Kol or Mreoli^ and the 
XiaXK-hs into 7 A«irr-a or Minnta—^OfizzXxiKi^ Xa\ir=A€irroi. 

X The *Hfjilafio\ov, 'HfilSpax/JMVj ^ihpaxjJMV, &c. are evident from 
their names. 



PONDERA^ NUMMI^ MENSURiE. 115 

Lib=Gra»tad, \Jnc=lois, Drachm^^ouf, Scrupul=e/*, Obol 

=ad, Sil=^. 
-A»=deu-dex — dod-bes — sept6n-Bemi — quin-tri-qua — 

sext-unc. 



TABLE VIII. 

ANCIENT WEIGHTS REDUCED TO ENGLISH TBOY WEIGHTS. 

Troy Grains, dec. 

RoMan Ounce — Rom-oz=^A 438 '00 

SHEKel — Shek=ebau 219 '00 

*Roman D-rachm=Ro-d=M/*,ptt 54 '75 

DENarius — Den=se,/oi ........ 62 '67 

f A-ttic D-rachm — A-d=»ci,/ 68 '4 

lib. oz. p.w. gr. 

Roman L-ibra — Ro-l=a2-aii .... 10 19 
Hfibrew M-aneh — He-m=e-^-oi-6e . . 2 3 7 12 

HEbrew T-alent— He-t=64/"y^-^' • • '^^^ 15 
:tAncient Axtic M-ina — At-m=a-c{-« . . 12 5 

Ancient Axtic T-alent — At-i^pa-t . . 71 3 

The Memorial Lines. 

Rom-oz=^Jfc, Shek = ebou, 'Ro'd = uf,pu, Den = se,l(nf 

A'd=sei,f, 
'He-t^bdf-yz-al, Ro-l=az-aw, He-m=e-^-ai-fte, At-m= 

a'd-u At-t=pa-t, 

* So Bishop Cumberland, from the Rabbinical accounts. But 
Bishop Hooper, from Philo and Josephus, makes it equal to the 
Attic Stater, or Tetradrachm=68'4+4, or 67-J-4 grains. 

f According to the weight of the standard mina of Solon, Bishop 
Hooper supposes, that whilst the money drachm fell gradually 
from 6S*4 to 62*57 grains, the ponderal drachm continued still 
the same, which I have therefore here retained. Dr. Bernard lays 
the middle sort of Attic drachms at 66 grains, which (Table I.) 
are accordingly valued at 8^^/. But the weight of the Attic drachm, 
under the first Roman Emperors, and for some considerable time 
before, was about 63*57 grains ; and upon this drachm, and the 
equality of it with the Roman denarius, most of the computations 
in classic authors are founded. 

X The common Attic mina was supposed equal to 12| Roman 
ounces. The mina medica was 16 Roman ounces, and exactly tlie 
weight of our ayoirdupois pound* 



116 MBMORIA TBCHNICA. 



TABLE IX. 

JEWISH AND ROMAN MONEY, ACCORDING TO BISHOP 

CUMBERLAND. 

L I. d. 

Hfibrew M-ina — He-m=p-a-/ . • . . 7 16 
HEbrew T-alent— He-t=^^<-a6-a2-A . . 353 11 lOj^ 
Golden DARick==12 G-erahs — Dar=GAi 

=la-do 104 

HEbrew T-alent of Gold CO-r;— He-to= 

ufoU'ha-p'h 6476 11 7 J 

SHEKel — Shek=s^-do,ro 2 4| 

Silver DsNarius — Den=dot-* .... 7| 
AssARiuin=F-arthing and Aalf — Assar^Fa-A 
A QuADrant=J of a Farthing — Qu^d=tro 
A MiTe=^ of a F-arthing— Mit=n-F 

The Memorial Lines, 

He-m = jp-a-/, He-t = tiit-ab-az-h, Dbx = Odd ^ la-do, 

He 'io=ufoU'-'ba-p'h, 
Shek=sl-do-rOy Den^^dot-^, Assar=Fa-4 Qu&d^iro 

Mit»ri.F. 



PONPERA« NUMMI« MBNSURJl. 117 



DECIMAL TABLES 

FOft THE MOKE EAST REDUCTION OF ANCIENT COINS, WEIGHTS, 

AND MEASURES. 

Those who understand decimal arithmetic will, I hope, 
excuse me, if, for the sake of such as are unacquainted 
therewith, I lay down two or three observations, in order 
to make the following tables more generally useful : 

First, that the denominator of every decimal fraction is 
an unit, with as many ciphers as there are places of num- 
bers in the fraction : thus *5 signifies -fy^, '05 signifies -rhrt 
'005 signifies -rV^nr* &c. 

Secondly, that the nine figures at the left hand of each 
of the tables may stand either for units, or, by the sup- 
posed addition of one, two, three, or more ciphers, for 
tens, hundreds, thousands, &c. 

Thirdly, that if the said nine figures are supposed to 
stand for one, two, three, four, &c., then the decimals 
stand as in the table : if for ten, twenty, thirty, forty, &c. 
or for one hundred, two hundred, &c. then, for every such 
supposed addition of a cipher, one figure in the place of 
decimals is to be added to the place of integers. 

Thus a Jewish cubit is equal to 1 English foot and 824 
thousandth parts of a foot. 

Ft. decim. 

1 cubit SB 1 -824 

10 cubits =s 18 *24 

100 cubits s 182 -4 

1000 cubits s 1824 

If there are not places enough of decimals to answer, 
they must be supplied with ciphers : 

liK deeini. 

Thus, 1 Attic talent ai 206 -25 

10 Attic talents ss 2062 *5 

100 Attic talents = 20625 

1000 Attic talents = 206250 &c. 



118 



MBMORIA TEGHNIOA. 



But as the common computation in classic authors is 
hy sesterces and drachms, I shall exemplify more particu- 
larly the foregoing observations in the two tables drawn 
up for them. 



SESTerce»l(/. 3/1 1, in de- 
cimal fractions of a pound 
sterling = 00807291667 
— Sest = zykypenassoi 



A-ttic D-rachm, or Koman 
denariuss=B7d 3/1, in deci- 
mal fractions of a pound 
sterling = -032291667 — 
A'd^^zidenassoi. 



s 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



s 

a 

9 
c 

6 



:= a o 
<§ 9 9 

O h o 

§o . 

La '^i' "* 

O b< W 

--SI 
t E I 



IS 



a S 

o 
o 



SogS 



^ CO 

S o 
S 2 

H 

o 2 



»• 
«« 



•00807 
•01614 
•02421 
•03229 
•04036 
•04843 
•05651 
•06458 
•07265 



S<1 
.2-;s 

b 
OD 

u c 






o z 



a o 



o o 



09 — 

S S 

so 






291667 
583333 
875000 
166667 
458^33 
750000 
041667 
333333 
625000 



s 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 



I 

P 

o 



o 
S 

.2 



• 

8 
a 

B O 

C Q 

Is^ § 

SPis 
rf"2 II Jl 

S I -"B. 

C "S .3 'S 
o ^ o © 



S 






s 



U OB 

p .-p 

si's 



2P'C 

" OS 
o o o 



•032291 
064583 
•0 96875 
•129166 
•161458 
•193750 
•226041 
•258333 
•290625 



667 
333 
000 
667 
333 
000 
667 
333 
000 



According to the observations before laid down ^ it is 
evident that 

Lib. decim. 

1 Sestertiiim, or 1000 ITS. =s 008 -07291667 

2 Sestertia, or 2000 HS. = 016 •14583333 

3 Sestertia, or 3000 HS. = 024 -21875 



PONDERA, NUMMI; MBNSUR^. 119 

And so down to 9 sestertia; the three first figures o 
the table being integers, the rest decimals. So, 

Lib. decim. 

•Decies Sestertium, or 1 Mill. HS. = 8072 -91667 
Vicies, or 2 Million HS. = 16145 -83333 

Tricies, or 3 Million HS. = 24218 -76 &c. 

Hence the value of most of the sums mentioned m 
classic authors may be discovered from the tables at first 
sight; the rest by the help only of addition. Thus, 

What is the value of the Centies Quinquagies HS? 

Lib. decim. 

Centies HS = 80729 1667 

Quinquagies » 40364 -5833 

Centies Quinquagies = 121093 -75 



What is the value of 375 Attic Drachms? 

300 Drachms = 9 -6875 
70 Drachms = 2 -26041667 
5 Drachms = 16145833 



375 Drachms , = 12 109375 



What is the value of 51 Myriads of Drachms? 

50 Myriads = 16145 -83333 
1 Myriad = 322 -91667 

51 Myriads = 16468 -75 



Note^ That the table for drachms or denarii will also 
serve for minae and for asses, remembering that a denarius 
is equal to 10 asses, and a mina to 100 drachms. Thus, 



s* 



* With the numeral adverb, Centenq TdiUia are always under* 
lood. 



120 



MBMORIA TBGHNIGA. 



^ris (sc. Assium) Millia X.=1000 den. 
^ris Millia XXV.=2600 denarii 
^ris Millia LXXV.=7600 denarii 



lib. decimals. 

32 -291667 
80 -72916 
242 -1876 



What has been already said will easily be applied to 
those which follow : 



*AtCic Drachm 


•Attic Talent 


fAttic 


Talent 


=Sid, 


: 


=206^. 5<. 


=193i. 15». 


• • 
1. decim. 




1. decim. 


1. decim. 


1 


-034376 


1 


206 26 


1 


193 -76 


2 


-068760 


2 


412 -60 


2 


387 -60 


3 


103126 


3 


618 -76 


3 


681 -26 


4 


-137600 


4 


826 00 


4 


776 -00 


5 


171876 


6 


1031 -26 


6 


968 -76 


6 


-206260 


6 


1237 -60 


6 


1162 -60 


7 


-2406-26 


7 


1443 -76 


7 


1366 -26 


8 


-276000 


8 


1660 -00 


8 


1660 -00 





-309376 


9 


1866 -26 


9 


1743 -76 


tShekel 




^Hebrew Talent 


UeD. Tal. Gold 


=2*. 7d, 




=387^. 10». 


=16 TaL Silver. 


L dcGim. 




1. decim. 


1. 


1 


-129166667 




1 


387 -6 


1 


6200 


2 


-268333333 




2 


776 -0 


2 


12400 


3 


-387600000 




3 


1162 -6 


3 


18600 


4 


-616666666 




4 


1560 


4 


24800 


5 


-646833333 




6 


1937 -6 


6 


31000 


6 


-776000000 




6 


2326 -0 


6 


37200 


7 


-904166666 




7 


2712 -6 


7 


43400 


8 


1 033333333 




8 3100 -0 


8 


49600 


9 


1 -162600000 




9 3487 -6 


9 66800 



• According to Dr. Bernard. 

f According to Dr. Arbathnot. 

X The shekel is here Talaed eqaal to 4 Attic drachms, accord- 
jig to J osephus ; and this valuation Dr.Arbuthnot has followed 
11 his Dissertations, though his tables are according to Bishop 
Cumberland. The talent := 3000 shekels. 



PONDERA, NUMMI, HENSURiE. 



121 





Grecian Digit. 


Ronuo Digit 


Jewish Digit 


In. decim. 


In. decim. 


In. decim. 


1 


-75646875 


1 


-72525 


1 


-912 


2 


1 -51093750 


2 


1 -45050 


2 


1 -824 


3 


2 -26640625 


3 


2 17575 


3 


2 -736 


4 


3 -02187500 


4 


2 -90100 


4 


3 -648 


5 


3 -77734375 


5 


3 -62625 


5 


4 -560 


6 


4 53*281250 


6 


4 -35150 


6 


5 -472 


7 


5 -28828125 


7 


5 -07675 


7 


6 -384 


8 


6 04375000 


8 


5 -80200 


8 


7 -296 


9 


6 -79921875 


9 


6 -52725 


9 


•8 -208 



OreciaaFoot 


nonun Foot. 


Jewish Cubit 


Ft deciuu 


Ft dedm 


Ft decim. 


1 


1 -00729 


1 


-967 


1 


1 -824 


2 


2 -01458 


2 


1 -934 


2 


3 -648 


3 


3 -02187 


3 


2 -901 


3 


5 -472 


4 


4 -02916 


4 


3 -868 


4 


7 -296 


5 


5 -03645 


5 


4 -835 


5 


9 -120 


6 


6 -04375 


6 


5 -802 


6 


11 -944 


7 


7 -05104 


7 


« •769 


7 


12 -768 


8 


8 -05833 


8 


7 -736 


8 


14 -592 


9 


9 -06562 


9 


8 -703 


9 


16 -416 





Roman Mile. 


< 


lewiA Mile. 


Roman Sq. Ft 


' 


tfile decim. 


Mile decim. 


8q.Ft decim. 


1 


-915719 


1 


1 -3817 


1 


-935089 


2 


1 -831438 


2 


2 -7634 


2 


1 -870178 


3 


2 -747157 


3 


4 -1451 


3 


2 -805267 


4 


3 -662876 


4 


5 -5268 


4 


3 -740356 


5 


4 -578595 


5 


6 -9085 


5 


4 -675445 


6 


5 -494314 


6 


8 -2902 


6 


5 -610534 


7 


6 -410033 


7 


9 6719 


7 


6 -5456-23 


8 


7 -325752 


8 


11 -0536 


8 


7 -480712 


9 


8 -241471 


9 


12 -4353 
G 


9 


8 -415801 



122 



MEMORIA TBCHNICA. 



Oivdan Sq. Foot. 
Sq. Ft decim. 

1 1 -0146365 

2 2 -0292730 

3 3 -0439095 

4 4 -0585460 

5 5 0731825 

6 6 -0878190 

7 7 '1024555 

8 8 1170920 

9 •1317286 



TI\40poy. 
Acre decim. 



Jugenxm. 
Acre decho. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 






•230632 


1 





-61824 





'461264 


2 


1 


•23648 





•691896 


3 


1 


-85472 





-922528 


4 


2 


-47296 


1 


•153160 


5 


3 


•09120 


1 


•383792 


6 


3 


•71944 


1 


•614424 


7 


4 


•32768 


1 


•845056 


8 


4 


•94592 


2 


•075688 


9 


5 


•56416 



Egyptian '^Apoupa, 


E^tm^f dry. 


Sextaritts dry. 


Acre decfan. 


Pint decim. 


I%it decim. 


1 


-763768 


1 


-97447 


1 


1 -0148 


2 


1 -527536 


2 


1 -94894 


2 


2 0296 


3 


2 -291304 


3 


2 -92341 


3 


3 -0444 


4 


3 -055072 


4 


3 -89788 


4 


4 -0592 


5 


3 -818840 


5 


4 -87235 


5 


5 0740 


6 


4 -582608 


6 


5 -84682 


6 


6 0888 


7 


5 -946376 


7 


6 -82129 


7 


7 1036 


8 


6 -110144 


8 


7 -79576 


8 


8 1184 


9 


6 -873912 


9 


8 -77023 


9 


9 •1332 





Cab dry. 


Medinmus. 




Modiw. 


Pint dedm. 


Bitafael decim. 


findwl decim. 


1 


3 -84731 


1 


1 -09612 


1 


-253526 


2 


7 -69462 


2 


2 -19224 


2 


-507050 


3 


11 -54193 


3 


3 -28836 


3 


-760575 


4 


15 •38924 


4 


4 -38448 


4 


1 -014100 


5 


19 -23655 


5 


5 -48060 


5 


1 -267625 


6 


23 08386 


6 


6 -57672 


6 


1 -521150 


7 


26 93117 


7 


7 -67284 


7 


1 -774675 


8 


30 -77848 


8 


8 -76896 


8 


2 028200 


9 


34 -6*2579 


9 


9 86508 


9 


2 -281726 



PONDERA, NUMMI MENSUR^. 



123 



s 

1 


Ephah. 
luhel decim 

-802433* 


Uiffrrif liquid. 
Pints decim 

1| 1 '1483 


Seztariiu liquid. 
Pints decim. 

1 1 -19618 


2 


1 -604867 


2 


2 -2966 


2 


2 -39036 


3 


2 -407300 


3 


3 -4449 


3 


3 -68554 


4 


3 -209734 


4 


4 -6932 


4 


4 -78072 


5 


4 -012168 


6 


6 -7416 


5 


5 -97590 


6 


4 -814601 


6 


6 -8898 


6 


7 -17108 


7 


6 -617035 


7 


8 0381 


7 


8 *3ii6-26 


e 


6 -419469 


8 


9 -1864 


8 


9 -56144 


9 


7 '221902 


9 


10 -3347 


9 


10 -75662 


Cab liquid. 
Pints decira. 


Log. 
Pints decim. 


Amphora. 
Hhds. decim. 


1 


3 -36267 


1 


-84064 


1 


-113821 


2 


6 -72614 


2 


1 '68128 


2 


-227642 


3 


10 '08771 


3 


2 -62192 


3 


-341463 


4 


13 -46028 


4 


3 -36256 


4 


-455284 


5 


16 -81286 


6 


4 -20320 


5 


-569105 


6|20 -17642 


6 


6 04384 


6 


-682926 


7,23 -63799 


7 


5 -88448 


7 


-796747 


8 


26 -90066 


8 


6 -72512 


8 


-910668 


9 


30 -26313 


9 


7 •66576 


9 


1 -024389 


Metretes^ 
Hhds. deoim. 


Bath. 
Hhds. decim. 


Coiigius.t 
GalL decim. 


1 


-16404 


1 


-114858 


1 


-896385 


2 


-32808 


2 


-229716 


2 


1 -792770 


3 


-49212 


3 


-344674 


3 


2 -689155 


4 


-66616 


4 


-469432 


4 


3 -585540 


6 


-82020 


6 


-574290 


6 


4 -481925 


6 


-98424 


6 


-689148 


6 


5 -378310 


7 


1 14828 


7 


-804006 


7 


6 -274695 


8 


1 -31232 


8 


-918864 


8 


7 171080 


9 


1 -47636 


9 


1 -033722 


9 


8 -067465 



* The exact fraction is -SOSiSS^. In the Jewish measures I 
haye followed Bishop Cumberland. The Ephah, according to 
Josephus, = 1*0961 bushel, and the Cab = 3*874 pints; tlie Cab 
liquid = 4*5033 pints, the Log equal to the Attic Econjf , and the 
Bath equal to the Metretes. 

t Equal to the Metretes of Syria. 

G 2 



124 



MBMORIA TECHNICA. 



1 


\ttic Drachm 
=62-57 Gr. 
Oi. decim. 

130215 


Shekel 

=4 Att. Drachms. 

Ob. decim. 

1 -52086 


lb. 

1 


Attic Drachm 

=62-67 Gr. 

Troy decim. 

-01085125 


2 


-260430 


2 


1 04172 


2 


-02170250 


3 


-390645 


3 


1 -56258 


3 


03255375 


4 


-520860 


4 


2 08344 


4 


-04340500 


5 


-651075 


5 


2 -60430 


5 


05425625 


6 


-781290 


6 


3 -12516 


6 


-06510750 


7 


-911505 


7 


3 -64602 


7 


•07595875 


8 


1 041720 


8 


4 -16688 


8 


-08681000 


9 


1 •171935 


9 


4 -68774 


9 


•09766125 


lb. 
1 


Shekel 
=219 Gr. Troy. 
Troy, decim. 

08802084^ 


Ib.l 
1 


Shekel 
4 Att Drachm, 
'roy. decim. 

043405 


Ro 

lb.1 

1 


man Libra. 
!*roy. decim^ 

-9125 


2 


0760416^ 


2 


086810 


2 


1 -8250 


3 


-1140625 


3 


130215 


3 


2 -7375 


4 


16208331 


4 


173620 


4 


3 -6500 


5 


-190104H 


5 


-217025 


5 


4 -5625 


6 


-2281250 


6 


-260430 


6 


5 -4750 


7 


-2661458^ 


7 


-303835 


7 


6 -3875 


8 


-30416664 


8 


-347240 


8 


7 •3000 


9 


-3421875 




9' 


-390645 




9 


8 -2125 



MISCELLANEA. 



SECTION VI. 

THE PROPORTION OF THE DIAMETER TO THE CIRCUMFERENCE 
OF A CIRCLE : THE AREA OF A CIRCLE AND ELLIPSIS : THE 
SURFACE AND SOLIDITY OF A SPHERE. 

Diameter : PERiphery :: 7 : 22 [Di : peri :: p : erf], or 
:: 113 : 355, or more exactly, the DiAmeter : PeRl- 
PHery :: 10.000,000 : 31.415,929. 

Di : peri : : p : ed : : bat : ilu : Dia : priph : : ozmll : fa- 
fal'Oudou. 

According to Van Ceulen, who carried the proportion 
to six and thirty figures, which, in memory of so laborious 
a work, were engraven upon his tomb at St. Peter's, in 
Leyden, the Diameter : Periphery :: 2 . 

auintil. Uaadr. Tril. Bil. Mil. Un. 

6,28,318.530,717.958,647.692,528.676,655.930,576. 
8, ektak, tuz-pap, nuk-sSp^ sne-lek,aiip8-8ul, omz^Uns. 

The Diameter multiplied by 3*1416 gives the PeRl- 
PHery [Diperi, bobs dat priph], consequently the peri 
phery divided by 3*1416 gives the diameter. 

The Area of a circle is given by multiplying the 
SQUAre of the D-iameter into 0*7854. 

Datur Area Squa-d per y,peHo. 

The ARea likewise is given by multiplying the fourt h 
part of the Diameter into the PEriphery— Ar=rodi-f-pe. 



126 MEMORIA TECHNIGA. 

The Area of an EllipsIs is given by multiplying the 
rectangle of the TRANsverse and CoNjugate DiAmeters 
into 0-7854. 

Area fit Ellips. Dia-tran-con-duct. in y,peilo. 

The SuRFace of a sphere is given by m ultiplying the 
PEriphery into the D-iameter — Surf^pe^-d. 

The SuRFace of a sphere is also given by multiplying 
the AREa of its largest circle into 4 — Surf=are-|-o. 

The SoLidity of a SPHEre is given by multiplying 4- of 
the RadIus into the SuRface — 8ol-sphe=rtrad-|-sur. 

The Memorial Lines, 

Di : peri :: p : ed :: bat : ilu, Dia : priph : : azmil : ta 

faUoudou. 
«, ektak, uiz'pap, nuk-sSp, sne-lek, adps-sulf omz-his. 
Dipert,6o6s dat Priph. datur Area squa-d per y,peilo. 
Are a fit Ellip s. Dia-tran-con-duct. in y,peilo, 
A rsr.rodi+pe , Surf=pelfd> Surf=are-|-o, Sol-sphe= 
,rirad-J-8ur« 



THE QUANTITY OF VAPOURS RAISED OUT OF THE SEA, 
ESTIMATED BY DR. HALLEY. 

The MEDiterranean, supposed to be equal to 160 square 
DEGrees, is computed to yield in vapour, per diem, 5280 
MiLlions of T-ons — Med=d^gbauz=lekym\Ut. 

The Thamcs is computed to carry down in a day of 24 
hours, into the sea, 20.300,000 Tons — Tham=<?z-t^^Aton. 

The rivers (FLUvii) which run into the MEDiterranean, 
are computed to carry 1,827.000,000 T-ons, which is 
little more than -^ of what is raised in vapour — Fluv-Med 
=aA^mil-t. 

The Memorial Line. 

Afed = d^g6atcs =: /eA^mil-t. Th2Lm = eZ'igthion. Fluv- 
Med=a^epmil-t. 



MISCELLANEA. 127 

The computations are made thus: 

By experiments it appears, that each SguAre F-oot of 
the surface of water yields in vapour, pet' diem, HAlf a 
wine PiNt — Squa-f=ha-pin. 

Each space of four feet square (=16 SQUAre F-eet) 
yields a GalIod — assqua-f=gal. 

A MiLe square, 6914 Tons— Mil=«nfl/lon. 

A square DEGree (of 69 J Englbh Miles) 33.000,000 
Tons— D^g (misou) ^intton. 

The Mediterranean=square 160degrees=5,280.000,000 
Ions, as above. 

The Memorial Line, 

Squa-f=ha-pin, assqua-f=gal, Mil^snafion, D6g (muou) 
timton. 



The quantity of water the Mediterranean receives from 
the rivers that fail into it, is estimated thus: 

The most considerable rivers that run into the Medi- 
terranean are the Eero, the RHOne, the Tiber, the Po, 
tile NiLe, the Don or Tanais, the DANube, the NiESTer, 
the NiEPER or Borysthenes. Each of these is supposed 
to carry down ten times as much water as the Thames* 
not that any of them is so great, but so to allow for the 
small rivers that run into that sea. Now the water of the 
Thamcs being computed at about 20.300,000 tons, as 
above, the nine rivers aforesaid each will amount to 
203.000,000; in all, 1,827.000,000 T-ons. 

The Memorial Lines, 

Th^^e.Z'.igth't, Eb-Rho-Ti-Po, Nil-Don, Dan-Niest- 
N ieper-aA^/>mil-t. 

The water of the Thames is computed thus: 

It b supposed to run at Kingston bridge, where the 
tide reaches not, at the rate of two miles an hour, which 



138 MEMORIA TBCHNIGA. 

is 48 miles in 24 hours; 48 Miles are equal to 48,480 
YArds — Mifk=YAko-feiz : which, being multiplied by 
300 YArds (the PRoiile of water at KiNgston bridge, 
where it is supposed to be 100 yards broad and 3 deep), 
produces 25.344,000 cubic Y-ards of water — Y&kthfeiz 
per ig=YH-tfotk: which are equal to 20.300,000 Tons 
— =ez-^^Atou. 

The Memorial Line. 

Mi/l=YaAo-/et2; (Kin-pr^) Ydto-feiz per ig=Y6l'tfoth 
^^ez'-igthton. 



THE VELOCITY OF SOUND, LIGHT, Ac 

A cannon bullet (Globus tormento bellico emissus) in 
a SECond, moves 204 YARds — In-sec Glob-yarc^o. 

Light (Lumen) in a second moves 200,000 MiLes — 
Lu-mile^M. 

Sound (Sonus) moves in a second 1142 feet (Pedcs) 
— Son-ped-moveta6/e. 

A cannon bnllet moves a M-ile in 17 HAlf Ssconds — 
G1ob-m-i/7ha-sec. 

Sound moves 9 mile in 9 half seconds \ — Sonn,ro. 

A cannon bullet would be in moving to the Sun (Ad 
SoLem) 32J years — Ad-Sol-giob=dri-*e,rc. 

Sound would be in moving to the Sun 17 years — Souap. 

The descent of heavy bodies (DEScensus GRAVium) 
is 16 F-eet-iV* or an inch, in a SECond — Des-gravi-sec 
=Vas,rad: and in more seconds as the squares of those 
times. 

A Pendulum of 39 iNches 2 tenths [Pendulum In- 
tov^d] osciLlates or vibrates SEConds — Oscil-Sec-Pen- 
dulum-in^otf,c^. 

The Memorial Lines. 

In-sec Glob-yarezo, hu-mWegth, Son-ped-moveta^. 
Glob-m-iipha-sec, Sonw,ro, Ad-sol-glob=^n-te,re, Sonirp, 
Des-gravi-sec= Fa*,rad. Oscil-sec-Pendulum-in<ott,d. 



MI8CBLLANBA. 129 

THE JEWISH MONTHS. 

Nisan or Asib * March 

ZiF or J-air April 

Sivan May 

Thamuz June 

Ab . . • • July 

ElUL illf^USt 

TiZRi or ETHEnim jSierptember 

BuL or M-ercbfttti^an October 

Ohisleu November 

THEbeth December 

SHBBeth January 

ADar or Veadar Februsry 

The Memorial Lines, 

Nis- A biMur, Zii-JJp, SiMa, Thim Jun, Ah Jul, BlixlAut/, 
Tizr-£the/Sbp, Bul-M Oc, ChisleuiV, TheDe, ShebJan & 
AdFeb. 



THE OBECIAN MONTHS. 

'EKarofififuufv June 

METATElTviwy July 

BOHAPopiifv Augu^ 

MALfjiaicTrfpifljv ^ptember 

TirANe\l/ii^y October 

n02fci^€iifv iVbvember 

FAMijXcdiv December 

'ANGESn^pii^v Januhry 

*EAA077j3oXta»v February 

MOXyvxi^y 3farch 

GAPrHAii;;* April 

^KlVpofopiitv . may 

The Memorial Lines. 

Hec/n, MetageiJte/, Boedr^lu^, Mai;Sf, PiianO, PosiVor, 
GamDecem, AnthesJan, lEAa,Feb, MouM, Thargel^, 
SkirJIfa. 

* t. e, part of March and part of April, ao'l so of the rest. 

G 3 



130 MBMORIA TBCHNICA. 

Note^ That the Athenians began their year from the 
new moon, whose full was next after the summer solstice, 
which was at first reckoned to be upon the 8th of July, 
after on the 27th of June. Vide Beveregii Chron, Itutit, 
lib. i. cap. 12. 



JEWISH AND CHRTSTIAN ERA OV THE CREATION. 

Both Jewish and Christian writers make use of the era 
of the creation of the world ; but there is great variety of 
opinions concerning the number of years between that and 
the birth of Christ. That which is most generally received 
is, that the first year of the vulgar Christian era commences 
from the day of his circumcision, viz. the first of January, 
in the yearof the world 4004, and of the Julian period 4714. 
The Jews place the creation of the world later by about 243 
years; ana the Greek historians, upon the authority of the 
Septuagint, sooner by about 1490 or 1500 years; so that 

r of the "} fthe 3762d year of the 

^ I Ecclesiastical era 

the 5509th of the GREek 
Civil era 

The Memorial Line, 

Christs=mundo/Af, Jud=ipaud, Grec-eccsz Umf, Grec- 
civils«/2;o». 



Oct 7 1 «^£ -^ 

Aug. 27 < J*; 

o ^ .. I Chiistian 

S«Pt- 1 L era 



Jewish era 
the 5494th of the GREek 



THE DATS* OF THE MONTH ON WHICH THE OTHER NOTED 

EPOCHAS BEGAN. 

BeeCbriit 

The destruction of 1'roy June 16. 1183 

+The first OLYnapiad June 19. 776 

The building of Rome Jpn/ 21. 753 

* For the years, see page 7. 

t The last day of the Olympic gtmes was upon the full moon 
fnmediately alter the saromer solstice. 



MISCELLANEA. 



131 



• Era of N A Bon assar . 
The PniLipic era • . 
Era of Con tracts . . 
The ViCTory at Actium 





B«-f. Christ. 


Teb. 


20. 


747 


Not?. 


12. 


324 


Oct. 


1. 


312 


Sept. 


2. 


31 




An 


. Dom. 


Aug. 


29. 


284 


July 


16. 


622 


June 


16. 


632 



The Dioclesian era 
The MAHOmetan era . 
The era of YEzdegird . 

The Memorial Lines* 
Mund=Octo», Oly-Jan, Phil-Norf, Nab-F^«, (bota) 

Yez-Troy-Ja«, Maho-las, Dio-gcji, Vict- Ac/a- Sc, Con-ta. 



"tFine Gold — Anrssaz^iloud 
Fine Silver — Argss/,ei/ 



THB SPECIFIC GRAVITIES OF SOME METALS AND OTHER B0DISS.t 

Dances Troy, decim. 

=s 10 -360273 
=s 6 860035 

Ounces Arerd. decim. 

=z 6 -553866 

= 4 -422979 

=: 1 -568859 

= 1 -493037 



a 



9 



Lead — Plums a,/tt/Aie/ 

Common Iron — Ter=:f,od€n 

Fine M ARble — Mar=6,/attM 

Common Glass — Vitru=6,(mt« 

Com. clear Water — Aquas6,/biA«ouji= 1 -578697 

Sound dry Oak— R^bozs, /isiaun = -63666& 

OiL Olive— 01-01e=,feife/ia = 0-628350 

The Memorial Lines. 

AuTzsaZyiloud, Arg=s/,ei/, P\uTa=i8,lutkul, Terssf^oden, 

MAr=:ib,laukkf 
Yitru=ib,oniz, Aqu2L=ib,loik8, Robo=, /uiaun, 01-01e= 

flektuz. 

^ The Nabonassarean years, not admitting any intercalary day, 
began, after every four years, a day sooner, and in 1461 years 
(hosa) went back throughout the whole Julian year, and began 
on the same day again. 

t See Ward's Mathematician's Guide, part i. chap. 10. 

t The beginnittg of the teehndcai words is from the Latin word 
for each* 



132 



MEMORIA TECHNICA. 



NUMERUS DIONITATUMy ftc. TEMPORE CAMDENI. 

*8uNTin AngliaDECANatus26, ARCHiDiaconatusGO, 
Dignitates & PRJEsendae 544, Ecclesiae PAROcniales 
9284 e quibus 3845 sunt AppRopriatae. In libro tamen 
Thomae Wohm Cardinalis descripto 1520, per comitatus 
numerantur ecclesiae 9407. 

The Memorial Line, 
Sunt Decanex, A rchdau2,Prseb2o^,ParochoiM2et/) Apprt^/ic 



THE TEMPLE OF THE EIGHT WINDS, MENTIONED IN 
DR. potter's ARCH^OLOGIA. 



ISZpog Eurus . . 

'AttriXtuyrriQ . . . Subsolanus 

KaiKlag .... CjECias . 

BopioQ BoReas , 

:&KIpoy CoRus . 

Z-ifvpog .... O-ccidens 

Noroc NoTus 

A'l\l/Q AFricus . 

The Memorial Line 

CaecisNE, S*ci-Cor=NoW, Ed=S£, A-AfsSoW, 
B6r=N, 'A7r=E, Not=S, Z-0=W. 

ACCORDING TO AULU8 GELLIU8, THE WINDS ARE THUS DISTINGUISHED: 



S-outh E-ast. 
E-ast. 

N-orth E-ast. 
N-orth. 
North W-est. 
W-est. 
S-outh. 
South W-est. 



Septentrio 
Eurus . . 
Auster . . 
Favonius . 
Boreas 
Yultumus 
Caurus 
Africus 



. ^AirapKrlag 

. Subsolanus 

. Notus . . 

• Zeph3rrus . 
. Aquilo 

. Euronotus 

• ^Apyegrrfc . 
. Libs . . 



North. 
East. 
South. 
West. 

North East 
South East 
North West. 
South West. 



* Camdeni BritanniCj edit. Jans. p. 67. 



MISCELLANEA. 138 



ROMAN MILITIA. 

A Legioq = 10 Cohorts. 

A CoHOrt = 3 MANipulL 

A ManipuIus = 2 ORdines. 

A TuRMa = 3 DECURios. 

10 T-urmae were the jmtiu equitatus, or horse belong- 
ing to a LEgion. 

Tlie Memorial Line, 

JjOfii^Coaz, Coho-Man/, Manip=Or(f, Turm=D^curt^ 
Taz-he. 



ROMAN LAW. 

Primus fundus Jurisprudentiae Romanae, LEGum Regi- 
arum fragmenta, (quae a Sexto PAPirio olim in unum cor- 
pus coliecta fuerant) sc. trium Regum Romuli, Numae et 
SERVii TuUii; secundus, leges 12 TABULarum; tertius, 
EDictum PERPetuum quod (ADRiani Imp. Authoritate) 
a SALvio Juiiano conditum atque in titulos digestum. 

Codex Justinianus compositus ex codicibus Gregoriano, 
Hermogeniano atque Theodosiano, noveliisque post eos 
positis constitutionibus. 

GREGorianus et H BRMogenianus nominantur ab authore. 
Prior codex ab A-drtano ad VALerium latas leges conti- 
nebat, secundus a CLAudio ad Diocletianum; THEodo- 
sianus leges CoNSTantini ad THEodosium. Novellae a 
TuEodosii temporibus ad JusTiNianum. 

The Memorial Lines, 

Leg-reg (Pap) Ro-Nu-Serv, Tabulacf, Ed-perp (Adri) 

Salv-Jul. 
Greg=A-Val, Herm=Clau.Di,Theo=sCon8t-The, Not 

=:Theo-Justin. 

The first CoDe of Justinian was published anno 529, 
the DiGests anno 531, the iNSTitute anno 533, the SEcond 
Code antu) 534, the Nov fills from the year 535 to 558. 

The Memorial Line, 
Cod-pri^en, Diglib, InsUt^, Co-se/tf, Noye/t/-/te£. 



134 MBMORIA TECHNICA. 

THE BISHOPS* VfHO REFUSED THBIR ASSENT TO THE 

Eusebius, bishop of Nicomedia. 
THEOGuis, bishop of Nice. 
MARis, bishop of CHALcedon. 
THEonas, bishop of MARMARica. 
SECundus, bishop of PTOLemais. 

The Memorial Line. 
£u-Nico,Theog-Ni, Mar-Chal, Sec-Ptol,Theo Mannar. 



THE TEN PERS-ECUTIONS UNDER 

Nefo, Domitian, NBRVa, ANToninus Plus, SEverus^ 
MAximin, Dficius, VALehan, AuRBltaD, DiocLBSiao. 

The Memorial Line. 

Pers = Ne-Do-Nerv-AntPi-Sev-Max-De-Val-Aure- 

Diocles. 



THE ELECTORS OF OERMANT 

Were the Archbishop of MENtz, TRiers, and Cologne, 
Elector Palatine of the RniNe, the King of BoHSmia, 
the Electors of BAvaria, SAXony, BRANDENburg; the 
Elector of Hanover was ADded, Anno Dam, 1693. 

The Memorial Line. 

Men-Trl-Co-Rhin-Bohe- Bay-Sax- Branden ; Hanover 
ad wut. 



* Ta^Tifu T^v iriaruf rptoucAatoi fiev irphs robs ScicaoirrJb, t^yywrdy re 

iypaipov Wyre 8i /mvoi o& wpofff^^turro, r^r A.^|cw5 rov Sfioowriom 
•wt\afi6fi€yot. EMfiios 6 Vucou^tas, Sfc^-SocmtU Historia EceU- 
viaHiea^ lib. i. cap. 8. 



MISCELLANEA. 135 



THE aUINQUARTICULAR CONTEOVERST, CONCERNING 

1. PREDEStinatioD. 2. Free-will (LiBERum Arbi- 
trium). 3. The force of Divine Assistance (AuxiLium). 
4. PERSeverance. 5. The extent of REDemption. 

The Calvinian doctrine upon these points, handed from 
Geneva by the English refugees, and propagated by Cart- 
Wright in the Margaret professor's chair at Cambridge, 
was, at a consultation of several prelates and divines at 
Lambeth, digested into nine articles, commonly called the 
LAMBeth ARTicles, and agreed upon N-ov. 10, 1595 — 
Naz-a/ou/; but, by order of Queen Elizabeth, were im« 
mediately recalled and suppressed. 

The Memorial Line, 

Lamb- Arts Cart-Nos-a/ou/, Pred^s-Liber- Auxili-Pers- 
Red. 



THE SEVEN PRECEPTS (s EFT-EM PRJECEPT-a) OF THE SONS OF 
NOAH ARE RECORDED BY THE JEWISH DOCTORS UNDER THE 
FOLLOWING titles: 

I. To worship the true God (CuLtus divinus), 
II. To renounce iDOLatry. 
JIL To commit no murder (CiEDes). 
IV. Not to be defiled with fornication, &c. (STUPrum). 

V. To avoid all rapine, theft, &c. (FuRTum). 
VI. To administer justice (JusTiTia). 
YII. Not to eat the flesh with the blood (Sanguis). 

Such Gentiles as were admitted to the worship of the 
God of Israel, and the hope of a future life, but were not 
circumcised, nor yet conformed to the Mosaical rites, being 
only obliged to the observation of the foregoing precepts, 
were called proselytes of the gate, in opposition to the 
proselytes of righteousness, or of the covenant, who differed 
nothing from the Jews, but that they were of Gentile race. 
iSee Lewis's Hebrew Antiquities. 



136 MKlIORiA TfiCHNlCA. 

The Mefr9rial Line. 

8 B pT'Vrmc ept =9 Cul-Idot-Csed -Stup-Furt- Jiistiti^Saii 
guis. 



MI8NAU, GEMARAH, TALMUD. 

The MiSNAh in 6 B-ooks [Misna-bs] contained 63 
TRacts [Traut]t into which the traditions or oral law of 
the Jews w€re methodically digested by Rabbi Jud^h 
HAKkADosh in the time of ANtoninus P-ias — Hakad- 
AnP. As soon as it was published, it became the sub- 
ject of the study of all their learned men, and the chiefest 
of them, both. in Judaea and Babylonia, employed them- 
selves to make comments upon it; and these, with the 
Misnah, make up both their Talmuds, i.e, the Jerusalem 
Talmud and the Babylonish Talmud. These comments 
vre called the Gem Arab or complement, the Misnah the 
liext ; both together the T ALmud — Tal=: Mis-Gema. The 
jERusalem TALmud was completed about A. D. 300 — ^T^I- 
Jert^. The B-«bylonish TALmud about 500, or in the 
beginning of the sixth century — ^Tal-Bu^. This latter is 
only in esteem among the Jews. See Prideaux^s Connexum, 
p. 328. 

The Memorial Line. 

Misna-b«-Trate/-Hakad-AnP, Tal=Mis-Gema, Tdl-Jert^, 
Tal-Btt^, 



CHARACTERS ARITHMETICI ORECI ET HEBRAICI. 

A6-/3l-yt-5o eu-orate l^oUrjk'dau-ia K^z-Xi-fW vu-^au, 
t>p'W€i ^<m p&^ffe-ri vf-i^u-yau^ ypoi-wfiei aavou, 
«A-a^-ai-no r\u~^au w nh oo?* »a aeat-^i-Do jm-daw. 
vp-Bei yau pa-ie-u^i n/-^M-aau |oique s]et fott. 

The decads and hundreds will be easily distinguished 
from each other, and therefore only the first figure is 
kidded, hi sc. V=3, t.e. 30; ne sc. ns=:2, i.e. 200. Pro- 
nounce }?ou kopou, o-avou sanpou, n/'thau/', fou tsadoic. 



MISCBLLANBA. 137 

THE AGES OF CHRISTIANITY AS DISTINGUISHED BT DR. CAVE, 
ACCORDING TO WHAT WAS MOST REMARKABLE IN EACH 
OENTUBY. 

Oent. I. Saeculum Apostolicum. 

Cent. II. Saeculum 6-nosticum. 

Cent III. Saeculum Novatianum. 

Cent. IV. Saeculum ARianum. 

Cent. V. Saeculum NESTorianum. 

Cent. VI. Saeculum EiJTychicum. 

Cent VII. Saeculum MoNOTHeliticum. 

Cent. VIII. Saeculum Eiconiclasticum. 

Cent. IX. Saeculum PnoTianum. 

Cent X. Saeculum Onscurum. • -^ 

Cent. XL Saeculum HiLdebrandinum. 

Cent XII. Saeculum WAldense. 

Cent. XIII. Saeculum ScHolasticum. \ 

Cent. XIV. Saeculum WiCKlevianum. > 

Cent XV. Saeculum Svnodale. 

Cent XVI. Saeculum R-eformatum. 

The Memorial Line. 

Ap-G-Nov Ari-Nest Eut-Monoth Eic-Phot-Ob Hil- 
Wa-Scho Wick-Sy.R. 



THE DIVISION OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE OUT OF THE BOOK 
CALLED NOTITIA IMPERII, SAID TO BE WRITTEN ABOUT THE 
TIME OF ARCADIUS AND HONORIUS. 

The whole empire was divided, into 13 Dioceses, under 
4 PRJEfecti Praetorio, and about 120 PRovinces con- 
tained in them — Prae/==di6t=pra€br. 

1. The Prcefectus Prcetorio ORientis, and under him 
fire dioceses, viz. the ORiental, £-^ptian, Asiatic, Pon- 
tic, and THracian dioceses — Or=E-As-Po-Th. 

2. The Prafectus PrtBtorio of iLLvricum, and under him 
two dioceses, viz. MAcedonia and D-acia — lU^Ma-D. 



188 MEMORIA TECHNICA. 

3. The Pr<Bfectu» Prcetorio of iTaly, and under him 
three dioceses, viz. Ixaly, lUyricmn, and AFrica— lt= 

It-Il-Af. ^ ^ ^. 

4. The Prcefectus Prcetorio G-alliarum, and vnder him 
three dioceses, viz. Hispania, GAllia, and B-ritannia— 
G=Hi8-Ga.B. 

The Memorial Line, 

Pr«/=di6i=prarf2, Ill=Ma-D, Or=E-As-Po-Th, It= 
It-U-Af, G=His.Ga-B. 



THE DIMENSIONS OF THE ARK AND TEMPLE. 

The len^h (Longitudo) of the Ark, 300 CuBits— 
Ark-lo-cubt^; the BReadth 50 cubits; the height (A Lti- 
tudo) 30 cubits — BrM«-al«. 

The length of the TEMple which King Solomon built 
for the Lord was 60 cubits, the BReadth thereof 20 cubits, 
and the height thereof 30 cubits (1 Kings vi. 2)— Tem- 
Idnsy-hiez'^Aty. The leugth of the PoRch 20 cubits, the 
height thereof 120 cubits (2 Chron, iii. 4) — PoTCz-bez, 

The Memorial Line. 
Ark-lo-cubi^-brM2f-aliaf, Tem-16n«y-brcaj-aUy, Pore«-^2. 



COMPUTATION OF THE COST, VESSELS, VESTMENTS, &c. OF 



Solomon's temple. 



ByVillalpandus's computation of the number of T A Lents 
of gold, silver, and brass, laid out upon the TBMple, the 
sum amounts to 6904.822,500/. sterling — TaUtem=Amso- 
ked'Ug. And the jewels are reckoned to exceed this sum. 

Vessels of gold (VAsa A urea) consecrated to the use 
of the Temple, are reckoned by Josephus 140,000 — Vas- 
wiTe^ib^zth: which, according to Capel's reduction of the 
tables contained in them, amounts to 545.296,203 pounds 
sterling — loUenAtirdyt. 



MISCELLANEA. 139 

The vessels of silver (VaS3 A Rf en tea) 1.340,000 [Va»- 
ixatozth'] are computed at 439.344,000/.— ;/?n-fo/^A. 

Priests' vestments of silk (VESTes Serics) 10,000 — 
Vest-serica2f/A. 

P-urple vestments for singers 2.000,000 — Pern; TRum- 
pets 200,000 — Tregth; other musical I NSTRumeuts 40,000 
— Instroz. 

Besides these charges, there was that of the other 
materials, and of 10,000 men per month in Lebanon to 
hew down timber (SvLViciDae) — Silvicidas. To caixy 
burthens (VfiCTores) 70,000 — Vectoiz. To hew stones 
(LAPicidinae) 80,000 — LapiA;y ; and 3,300 overseers 
(Episcopi)--EpiscopH^; who were all employed for 7 
years (ANnis SfiPTem), to whom, besides their wages 
and diet, Solomon gave a free gift 6.733,977/. (DoNum 
SoLOMOnis) — S'pauUnoip, The treasure left by David 
towards carrying on this work (reliquit DAvid) 
91 1 .416,207/.— na6-o4«-dyp. 

N.B. th is left out, as Sylvicidas; for Sylvicidas^A, &c. 
it being impossible to mistake 10,000 for 10. 

The Memorial Lines. 

Tal-tem=«oMa;o-Acc/-M^, \ d^-?Mxe^h6zth—lol-en&U'dyt, 
\3»'^Tatozth=Jin-tofth,Tregth, Jnstro«,Vest-seric42?, Peiw. 
An-sept Sylvicidas;, h^piky, Vectoiz, Episcop/i^, 
Don-Solomo-«-pau^-noip, reliquit Dav-na6-o^s-(/yp. 

The number of those that returned (REDUces) from 
the captivity were 42,360 — ^edufe-tauz; besides Pro 
SELytes 7,337— Proselw/tp. 

The particular sums in Ezra's CATalogue amount to 
29,828-- Cu-Ezdtm-keL 

The particular sums in NsHEmiah's CATalogue, 31,031 
— CvX-^ehetazib, How these accounts are reconciled, 
see the Index to the Bible. 

The Memorial Lhne. 
Reduye-toMJB-Proselot/ip, Cat-Ezc/o«-AreA;, Cat-Nehehvsrt6. 

The SiLver of them that were numbered of the Con- 
gregations was a hundred TALents, and a thousand seven 



140 



MZMORIA TBCHriiCA. 



hundred and threescore and fifteen ShekcIs after the 
shekel of the sanctuary , a BsKah for every man, that is, 
half a shekel after the shekel of the sanctuary, for every 
one that went to be numbered, from twenty years old and 
upwards, for six hundred thousand and three thousand 
and five hundred and fifty men. JExod xxxviii. 25, 26. 

The Memorial Line. 
Sil=CoB=Tal^-sh4kapo»l, Beksyt^lux=Shek^izappu. 



DIFFERENCE OF TALENTS. 

Attic Minaa. Attic Drachma 

A STRian TALent contained ... 15 1500 

A PTOLEMaic Talent 20 2000 

An EuBoic Talent 60 6000 

An ALEXANdrian Talent .... 120 12000 

An ANTiochian Talent 60 6000 

A larger Attic Talent 80 8000 

A BABYLonish Talent 70 7000 

An iEciNean Talent 100 lOOiX) 

•A RHodian Talent 100 10000 

A TvRian Talent 80 8000 

An EGYPTian Talent 80 8000 

The Memorial Lines. 

Tal-Syr=rMa/, Ptolcm=er, Euh^auz, Alexan=to & 

Ant=attz, 
Att-maj=m, Babyl^otsr, JEpn=ag, Rhsa^, Tyr- 

£gypt3set2« 

I shall conclude with two lines, just to show how, by 
this niethod, may be remembered the year and chapter of 



* According to some, the Rhodian talent contai ied but 4500 
Attic drachms, and the Euboic but 4000. Vide Brerewood de 
PondeHbm et PretiU^ cap, 0. 



MISCELLANEA. 141 

any particular statute. Those to whom a bint of this 
nature may perhaps be thought useful, are best capable of 
applying and improving it as they shall see occasion. 

An Act for prevention of Frauds and Perjuries, 29 
Carol. 1L c. 3. — Fraud-Carolen-^ 

An Act against abuses in presentation to benefices 
(SiMony) 31 ElIz. c. 6. — Sim-£U'6-«. 

The Bill for first fruito (FRiMiTiae) 26 H-en.yilI. 
c. 3. — Primit-He«-^ 

An Act for the dissolution of MoNASTeries. 

The lesser 27 H.VIII. c. 28 | M^«oa# tt.,«^a .a a« 
The greater 31 H.VIII. c. 11 } ~Monast-H6p^A,t6.Aa. 

The Memorial Line, 

Fraud-Carolen-/, Sim-Elt6-<, Frimit-He«-^, Monast-Hep- 
ek, ib^ba. 

To remember the several statutes relating to the same 
subject must needs be more difficult, as there is but one 
leading syllable for the whole line; but may be done in 
the following manner: 

Some of the principal acts which relate to the poor 
(PAUPeres) are 43 £Liz. c. 2. 13, 14 Car. II. c. 12. 
3,4 William and M-ary, c. 11. 8, 9 WilI. III. c. 30. 
9, 10 WilI. III. c. 11 12 Anu, c. 18. 

The Memorial Line. 
'Pauf'E]ot'€fiaiat'ad,Wi-Mt'ab,Wi\h'iz,fM»b,Anad'bei, 



LOWE'S MNEMONICS. 



Dr. Watts, in his Essay on the Improvement of the 
Mind, near the conclusion of the 17th chapter, where he 
more especially treats of Improving the Memory* makes 
the following observation: 

" Dr. Grey, in his book called Memoria Technica, has 
'' exchanged the figures 1, 2, 3, 4> 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, for 
'* some consonants, b, d, t, f, 1, s, p, k, n, z, and the 
** vowels a, e, i, o, u, y, with several diphthongs, and 
** thereby formed words that denote numbers, which may 
" be more easily remembered : and Mr. Lowe has im- 
" proved Dr. Grey's scheme in a small pamphlet called 
" Mnemonics Delineated, whereby in a few leaves 
'' he has comprised almost an infinity of things in science 
'' and common life, and reduced them to a sort of mea- 
** sure like Latin verse." 

Under sanction of the great authority above quoted, 
the publisher of the present edition has annexed Mr. 
Lowe's tract, which the author originally intended both 
as a supplement to and an improvement of Dr. Grey's 
method; accordingly asserting in his advertisement, that 
** most of the articles are what perhaps did not occur to 
'* Dr. Grey; and the rest are reformed to good purpose, 
** particularly those of Weights, Coins, and Measures, of 
" which 1 have given a full account in less than eigh^ 
" pages, whereas the Doctor's, though very defective^ 
" amounts to twenty-eight-" 



lowe'8 mnemonics. 143 

The two schemes are dow before the reader, to use 
whichever seems best ; and though Mr. Lowe's is, in some 
instances, little more than a repetition of Dr. Grey's plan, 
yet it has been thought advisable to reprint the whole at 
full length, and even to follow his peculiar mode of spell- 
ing, as most consistent with brevity. It may also be 
necessary to premise, that Mr. Lowe's astronomical calcu- 
lations are according to the old style, and his geographical 
divisions are as they existed in the year 1737, the time 
when his pamphlet was first published; which disagree- 
ment with the present period it is hoped the industry and 
sagacity of the learner can easily rectify, by composing- 
new technical words, which may be more easily remem- 
bered than those formed by another ; these works being 
originally designed more as specimens of what might be 
done by attention, than as complete sets of tables in the 
various branches of learning and science. 



THE KEY. 

DIRECTIONS TOR THE BETTER LEARNING TO REMEMBER 
EIOURES OR NUMBERS EXPRESSED BT LETTERS. 

a e i u an 01 ei on y 
1234567890 
bdtflspknz 

g 100^ th 1,000, m 1.000,000. 

r denotes fractions, as follows; ^ro |, ,tVo |, <2,6rt 21, 
^rag '01. 



ARITHMETIC* 

ARITHMETICAL CHARACTERS. 

+ and ; — less ; x multiplied-into ; -r- divided-6y » 
is, gives. 



144 



LOWES MNIiMONlCS. 



THE DIYISION OF THE OLD ROMAN AS, VIZ, ANY INTEGER 

OR WHOLE.' 

Uncia. Sext. Qu^. Trtens. Quinc. Sem. Sept. Bes. 

D6dr&. Dext Deu. 



As, parts 
DeuDx 
DextaDs . 
Dodrans • 
Bessis 
Septunx • 



. 12 
. 11 
. 10 
. 9 
. 8 
. 7 



Semissis • 
Qiiincunx 
Triens • 
Quadrans 
Sextans . 
Uncia . 



6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 



COINS. 

COINS REDUCED TO FARTHINGS. 

1 E.]* Sh-oA. Cr-2/y.]- N-»rfaj. Ange-okz. M'^ufy. 

Gui-hzyk. Car-^zo. Jac>6e^. 

2 H. Ger-/.] B6-ft. Sh-abz. •Man-s«jM. fTaUdctM 

fciL"] Sh-aple, Tal-icm dusth, 

3 G. hep-,t&riiau. DYch^-a,pr^. 6h'U,rau,] *Dr-i6. 

4 R. TfOipur&th, §As-^,ra2r.] Ses-p,irf. Y^al^vh 
D%n-t6. Sp-ol/.] Attr-oxpte. 

{Drachm.] H%b-l«. Att-«. Alex-otd— Min.] 
Att-<^. It&l-eAetz. 






( Tal.] Att-6cmA^A. B&b-etoM.] Att-l6a«M 
„ ( et^. Bab-lan-^uiu^A. Vi-akyth, 
, o. ^ ( Stater (gold) Att.;x>»7. Cyz-PWl- Alex-dap. 
+ 2 ( Croes-Dart-6M/y. 

- '^ C As weighed OuDcfet-ad, U-C-ftowa*; e; fouz: 
J \ a; tip: -dre; kis. 



MONEY. 

SUMS OF MONEY, OR MONEY OF ACCOUNT. 

- C (E) Penn-/. Gr-cw. Found-otuy. (G) 
( MiN. Mg\'gssub88. ^AnUsyssg, 



Tal. 



LOWB^S MNEMONICS. 145 

g C 'Bab-aisstuns, "PUazszazti. S^-idsspoiL Tyrian- 

( eiz^fatL 
M I (R) Sbsterce tl6'ath, duo, bin! nummi 

\ t5-am, duo, biaa, 
Q i — stertia : or millia sesterti^m, above, by the 

( adverbs, as follows : 
g i Bis sestertiiim, or bis ; understanding millia centum 

( (or centena). 

Abbreviatures explained* 

JEgin^a m^na, talentum, (lin.) 5. Alexandrina 
drachma, *; stater, |.. Angel, 1. Awtiochica min. 
tal. 5. As, 4, §. Attica drachma, * ; mina, * ; sta- 
ter, |.; talentum, -f-. Aureus denarius, 4. Babyh- 
nica min. tal. f. Bekah, 2. Carolus, 1. Croesius 
stater, 1. Crown, 1. Cyzic^nus stater, 1. Daricus 
stater, 4- Denarius, 4. Dichalcos, 3. l)rachma, 3. 
Gerah, 2. Groat^, 5. Guinea, 1. Hebraica drachma, 
*. Jacobus, 1. Italica mina, *. Lepton, 3. Ma- 
neh, 2. Mark, 1. Mina^, *, 5. Noble, 1. Obolus, 
3. Pemntf^j 5. Philippicus stater, 4- Pounds 5. Pto^ 
lemaica min. tal. 6. Rom^num talentum, f. Seg- 
tertium, 7. Sestertius, 4. Shekel, 2. Shilling, 1. 
Sportula, 4. Stater, 3. Syria min. tal. 6. Talen- 
tum^f 2, 5. Teruncius, 4. Tyria min. tal. 6. Vic- 
toridtus, 4. 

Synonyms and Equivalents,* 

JEs, as. Assarium, as. Attica minor mtnarsantio- 
chica. Attica major mma=tyria. Bigdtus, denarius. 
Centussis, 100 asses. Chalcos, } dichalchos. DecuS" 
m°, 10 asses. Didrachmon, 2 drachmae. Diobolon, 
2 oboli. Duponditu^, 2 asses. Eubcea mina = an- 
tiochica. Hemiobolon, J obolus. Laureat, carolus 
Libella, as.' Libra (or libra pondo) = mina attica. 
Mna^ mina. Nonussis, 9 asses. Nummus, sester- 
tius. Obolus, J noble. Octussis, 8 asses. Penta- 
drachmon, 5 drachmae. Pondo, v. libra. Quadrans, 

H 



146 lowb's mnbmonigs.. 

^ as, i noble.. Quadrig&tus> denarius. QuadmusU^, 
4 asses. Quinarius, yictori^tus. Quinquessi^, 5 
asses. Rhodia s seginea. Sembella^ semilibella. Se- 
milibella, \ libella. Semunda^ \ uncia. Sescuncia, 
1} uncia. SextanB^^ -^ as. Sefstula,^ -i- uncia. So- 
lidus, aureus. Tetradrachmon, 4 drachmae. Tetro- 
bolon, 4 oboli. TreuUt 3 asses. THcessis, 30 asses. 
Tridrachmon, 3 drachmae. Tretnsf^, i- as. Triobolon, 
3 oboli. Vigesiis, 20 asses. Unciaf^, ^v as. 



1. N. B. The several eoins, measures, and weights, being reduced 
to the lowest denominations, the memorial verses answer all the 
purposes of the largest tables: (1) The difference of any two 
terms being known by subtraction*: and (2) How many of any 
make one of another, by division^. e. g. (a) What is the dif- 
ference between a ;^Attfm<7 and a. Shekel? Answ. (Sh-a&.*) 110— 
(Sh-o£) 46=? 62 q. i. e. S 2 : S : 2—8 1 = S 1 : 8 : 2, the shekel 
more than the shilling, (b) How many Spans make a Fathom ? 
Answ. (Fath-oid) 72-*-(Spa-n) 9=8. Accordingly, if it be asked, 
fVhat is a Fathom 7 (and so of any other) the answer may be made 
the same way, in any of the prior denominations : e. g. 24 palms, 
or 6 feet, or 4 cubits, or 2 yards, or li* pace, &c. 

2. Any whole was called AS, and 1 tyirelfth of it UnciaT whence 
our terms of ounces for weight, and inches for length]. The seve- 
ral numbers of those uncise (between 1 and 12) were denomi- 
nated, in order, as follows in text : viz. Sextans (i.e. 4-) 2 Quadrans 

(^) 8, &c. and express their manner of reckoning Interest of 

money: thus usHree asses [centesimee] was 1 per month [12 per 
year] per cent, (suppose aurei, or pounds:) deunces, 11 tweldhs 
per month, and so on to undaruie, I twelfth per month [1 per 
year] e. g. 20d, per month, 20«. per year. 

8. Of the three apartments distinguished by brackets, in the 1st 

are Brass- or Copper- ; 2d, Silver- ; 3d, Gold-coins. ^N.B. (1) 

Sh-ofc (as appears by the Abbreviatures explained underneath, and 
by the key above) signifies SXilling 48 : i. e. a shilling is 48 far- 
things ; and so of the rest. (2) p (the memorial letter) may be 
pronounced wee or wi, to disti pguish it from i ; e. g. Cr-^, as if 
it were Cr-^/tw. 

4. i. e. in the year fUrbis V'ondila) fnom the building of the 
^ty of Rome, 190— C-/o«z ; 1 e. U. C. 490, when the Punic war 
had exhausted the treasury, it weighed, but 2, and so of the rest. 



LOWE'S MNEMONICS. 147 

5. i. e. the ^ginean mina was (ubss) 5656 q : (g) 100 of which 
made the ^ginean talent. And so of the rest. 

6. N, B. In these lists, those in Italic are moneys of account ; 
the rest, coins. The Figures and Marks refer to the correspond- 
ing memorial -verses. 

(c) N. B. There are also Coined Half-guineas, Seven-shilling 
pieces, Half-crowns, Threepences, Twopences, Halfpence, and such 
as are distinguished by a superior ^. 



MEASURES. 

CUBIC MEASURES REDUCED TO PINTS. 

^5Quar-rf. •Gal- A;. R-fl/*o. Bar-eW. Ti-(wiNE) ««. 

( H-uzf, P-aiipe. B-athei.. T-ethbau. 

i Yirk'boid, &sf} KYl-a6eA, haff (beer & ale). 

\ Bar-bde^A, Was. H5g-^/ad, hups, 
« ( Ve-bs, Bti-«o. Str-aeA. Coom-cfus (dry). Se-w6e. 

\ CYk-etzo, We-iihpe, L^'lady, 
A C(^^9') C-,Mrei. L-iro, Cab-t. H-az (h). Se^h-dy. 

1 Bath-«^. H5in-au2U (^uid), 
-J Cab'jdurau. Gbm-^uraz, Seboi (dry). B^-^. 

V. Le-dlau, H5mer-/at. 
Q ^Coch-, r&dp, Ch-rattz. Myst,roA (g). Conch-^raf, 

J Oxyba-,re/. Metr-ew. 
^ J Coch' yvadp. Choen-6re. M^dim-pe (dry). Cy- 

' Ox-C6ty-Xest-as the Roman. 

r Quart- ,r^. Sg-a,r/. Ctt-p. Ui-ek-rd (r). QuS- 
^\ dr-wp. CXiX^'bafy. U, Cy. Ace. Hem. 

J Lig-,ro^. Cy-,ra(/. Acet-,rc». HSm-(DRY'l in,r^. 

V. SS-a,rw. fMod-as,re. 
-^(•GALLttN c5ntains inches (dry) doid.r^ : (begr) 
^") -ifeg: (wine)c^a». 

C fP^TTLE Quarts (dr.) i (liquid)-c — +MoDf-Pints 

( (iiquid)-an (dry )-6aM,ro. 

Abbreviatures explained. 

Acetabulum (lin.) 9, 8. Barrel, 1. Bath 4. 
Bushel, 3. Butt, 1. Cab, 4. Caph, 4. Cheme, 6. 

H 2 



148 lowb's mnemonics. 

Chaudron, 3« Chcenix, 7. Cochlearion, 6. Concha, 6. 
Congius, 8. Coomb, 3. Culeus, 8. Cyathus, 9. 
Firkin, 2. Gallon, 1. Gomer, 5. Hemina, 9. 
Hin, 4. Homer, 4, 5. Hogshead, 1, 2. Kilderkin, 2 
Last, 3. Letech, 5. Ligula, 9, 8. Log, 4. Me- 
dimnus, 7. Metrites, 6. Modius, 9, 11. Mystron, 6. 
Oxybaphon, 7. Feck, 3. Pottle, 11. Puncheon, 1. 
Quadrantal, 8. Quart, 1. Rundlet, 1. Seah, 4, 5. 
8eam, 3. Sextarius, 8, 9. Strike, 3. Tierce, 1 
Tun, 1. Urna, 8. Wey, 3. 

Sffnonyms and Equivalents. 

Amphora, quadrantal. Amphoreus, metretes. Ca- 
dus, metrites. Carnock, coomb. Chos, congius. 
Coron, homer. Cotyle, hemina. Ephah, bath. Lin- 
gula, ligula. Omer, homer. Oxybaphon, acetabulum. 
Pipe, butt. Quarter, seam. Quartarius, ^ sextarius. 
Semimodius, J modius. Xestes, sextarius. 



1. i.e. A Firkin (1) of Beer=>72 pints; (9) of Ale=64 pints; 
and so of the rest. 

2. By act of parliament, in 1607, the gallon contains only 268^ 
inches. 

8. By experiment, made in 1666, it was found to contain only 
S!84 inches. 



LONG MEASURES REDUCED TO INCHES* 

Nail-d,ro. Pal-f. H^n-^. Spa-n. Toot-ad, 

Ciibt-6et. £ (f 1) ep (eng) ol. 
Y-w. Pa-«j?. Fath-pc, Ro-ftouA. Furl-otnd^f. 

Mi'sitsy. Le-miles 3. 
H. Pal-/. Sp-ad. C-cf. F-otw. lEz-bdf, Ar-and. 

SchoeH'ondp, SVk'tiaug* M^oustk. 

{G. Dor-/. LYch-ilr. Orth-a6. Sp-ocf. Pygm-ail. 
'Pf-dz. O-nau. St-naug, M-oiikyz. 
( R. IJnc-^n. Pal-/. Pe-bs, Palm-if^. Cfko-ef. 
\ Gtii-kp. VoBB'kp. SUk-hyth. 



{ 



LOWE'S MNEMONICS. 149 



PROPORTIONS. 

^ C Line-5e. B&r^t. Digit, Inch (Heb. Ok. Rom.^ 

( nad: ,puld: peldu^. [M'-eiz<A. 
fj J Foot — £ng-a<A. — Gr^k-oz^. — ^"Rom (coss) naup 

I (st) aupe (vfo) (fukau. 

Abbreviatures explained, 

Arabian pole, 3. Barley-corn, G. Cubit=pygme, 
PYS^^f pechus 1, 3, 5. Digit, G. Doronsspalm, 4. 
£11 (flemish, english), 1. Ezekiel's reed, 3. Fathom, 2, 
3. Foot=pous=pes, 1, 5, 7. Furlongsstadium, 2, 
3, 4, 5. Gradus, 5. Hand, 1. League, 2. Li- 
chas, 4. Line, 6. Mile = milion s milidre, 2, &c. 
Nail, 1. Orguia, 4. Orthod6ron, 4. Pace=pas8us, 
2, 5. Palmssdoron, 1, 3, 5. Palmipes, 6. Passus= 
pace, 5. Pes s foot, 5. Pygme, 4. Pygon, 4. Rod, 
2. Schoenus, 3. Spansspithame, 1, 3, 4. Spithame 
=span, 4. Stadium = furlong, 4, 5. Uncia, 5. Yard, 2 

Synonyms and Equivalents. 

Ammah, cubit. Aulos, furlong. Chebal, schoenus. 
Cubit (lesser) pygme, (greater) pechys. Dactylo- 
dochme, doron. Diaulos, 2 stadia. Dochme, doron. 
Gomed, span. Raneh, Ezekiel's reed. Measuring- 
rod, schoenus. Mili-are,-on, mile. Palaeste, doron. 
Pathil, schoenus. Pechys, cubit. Perch, rod. Pole, 
rod. PoUex, uncia. Pous, pes. Tophach, palm. 
Ulna, cubitus. Zereth, span. 



1. N.B. The DiffU is sometimes divided into 4 grains; the Line 
into 6 points. 

2. N.B. A Sabbath-day's Journey l9 reckoned to be 780 paces, 
6 of which made the Parasang^ 48 a day*tt journey, 

8. i.e. The proportion of the Roman foot to the English (divided 
into 1000 parts) is here expressed as found— on the monument of 
Cossutbu—ovk that of HtatiUus—oti a congius of Vespasiain. 



150 lowb's mnemonics. 

SQUARE MEASURES REDUCED TO SQUARE FEET 

^ C E. Yar-ft. Pace-<f«. Fttle-epe,r^. Ro5d-iisAoii«. 

^ ( G. Plethron azetsf. ArouiR, the half: but 

( Egyptian itdaun. 

<. ( R. JugeT-esoutp, Cli-tuaU, Yii-ni/^. (mYn) 

I A-fdke'i (qu) atfauz. 

Abbreviatures explained. 

Actus minimus, quadratus, 3. Clima, 3, Jugeram, 3. 
Versus, 3, Yard, 1. 

MULTIPLICATION TABLE, 

{CP-oi,<m. P-ei,iw. P-ou^. K-ei^,"^ 
( K-ou,p6. N-5u,e»a. (7x7 

I P-ad/et. L-ad,«j?. S-H^. P-ad,Jfeo. f =49 
( K-ad,oif£if. N-ad,aa;6f. J 



NUMERICAL LETTERS, 

In Numerals] A less number, afore, Abates^; 



- rin Numerals] A les 
■p 3 after, Encreases.' 
^'\ 1-6. V-«. X-a^. 
(. M (cio*) ath: henc 

{«-A. »-« 
au^sy* 
-ath by 
the ni 
Ca-b, i-az, p-og** <rr-a«. (vi) 
p J sanpi-oicj/2.' a (a ^ ayazyz. 
g • jI-A. n-a. A-a«. H-a^r. X-a^A. M-a^sM. IT mul- 
(, tiples others inscribed in it.*** 



1. e. gr. IV. 4, IX. 9, XL. 40, XC. 90. 

2. e. g. VI. 6, XIV. 14, XIX. 19, XXIX. 89. 

fty 11, ^ 19: up 101, 3p 102 ^la 11, pn 101, Ac. 



Ij-uz, C-azp, D-uys. 
hence (CCI33) dj^M. 
g I «-A. »-a5f. p-flS'* — ItD-fru* — from-Mgr by t»qtC3'' to 

• [CCCIDDD 

^ I ,•..- .^j the Units:* but oftener by nV«, prefixing 

(. the numbers* [azyth, 
- Ta-A. i-az. p'Og^ crr-aw. (vi) kopp^-nj^ (rot) 



LOWB*d MNEMONICS. 151 

3. Formed, ia current writing, from M; part whereof, united, 
(vis. 13) became D. 500; hence i33 5000, id33 50000. 

4. i. e. Units, tens, hundreds, l)egin from the letters here speci- 
fied; and are to be reckoned on, in order, from them: e.g. a I, 
£ 2, 78, &c. < 10, K 20, X 30, &c. £ 100, a 200, &c. 

6. Instead of n^ being the ineffable name of Jehovah. 

6. e.g. *t 500, D 600, f 700, &c. 

7. Before the letters expressive of hundreds; as, *iVlH 1584: 
very seldom otherwise ; ytt 1070. 

8. e. g. D^fiSit 2000, D^fiStt: 3000, D'&Sk*7 80000, &c. 

0. The various figures and names of these numeral_characterS| 
see in my Table of Greek characters. 

10. e. g. A (10) inscribed in n (5) is [aI (50). 



PRACTICE 

1. If one? ^ the sought into Price,' or its factors;' or 6y 

Aliquot parts/ and» by the Aliquots of Fractions of 
Sought (if any) divide Price.* 

2. What* II one?* the Price by Commodity;' but, if too 

large, by its factors.' 



1. i. e. In questions where the conditional term is 1 : as, when 
wd say, '* If one cost so much, what will so much cost?" 

2. i. e. Multiply the question-term, or thing sought^ into the 

price, &c, e.g. ffone cost 10«. what will 20 cost? &e. An^w. 

20 (the thing sought) x 10 (the price)=200«. i.e. 10^. 

8. viz. when more commodious. . g. If one cost 12#. 6d. 

what will 14? Answ. The factors of 14 being 2x7; say 2 x 

12f.6d.=259.: then 7 x 25f.= 175*. i.e. 82.15*. N.B. If the 

multiplicator be not resolvable into factors, take those that come 
nearest it, and add the price for the odd one, or multiply it by 
what the factors want of the multiplicator. 

4. Divide it 6^ the Even parts of the denomination, in which 
you would have the answer. — e. g. y^one cost 12«. 6cf., what will 



152 



LOWE'S MNBMTONICS. 



14? Answ. lOr. being the } of U. and 2t,(Ul, (which makes ap 
the 12«. 6d.) the 4 of iOs. ; say 2 in 14=72. ; then 4 in 7 (the qao- 
tient of 14 by 2)=1 : and there remains 31., which, in the next 
inferior denomination (viz. shillings) is 60, then 4 in 60=i6ff. 



Thus 14 14 pds. pks. &c. 



9 



9, d, 

10 

26 

12 6 






/. s. 

7 
1 16 

8 16 



«. d. 

10 
20 
6 



12 6 



i 

i 

i 






7 
1 





8 
7 



8 16 



5. As in the following example 



84 cwt 8 qr. 11 lb. at U. U. IQd. 





84 




qr. lb. 


s . w.i*. 


= 21 




2 i 

1 ; 


o iS 






^ 


84 




7 1 


5 


108 




4^ 


6d. i 


42 




— 


4rf.-i- 


28 




3 U 


Sqr. I lib. 


18 


6 


aliq. of fracL 


In all 1862^. 


6d 


. the answer : 



10 11 
6 6 



1 
.0 






18 6 



pr.offhict.* 



02/. I2i. 6d. the price of 84 c wt. 8 qr. 1 1 lb. 



6. i. e. In sums, wherein the Question-term is 1 ; as when we say, 
** If so much cost so much, What*U one cost?** 

7. e.g. If 12 cost lOs.Gd, what will 1 ? Answer, 12 in 10ff.6cC 
I cannot have ; but 12 in 10 x 12 (to reduce it to pence)=120-i-6 
=126: then 12 in 126= lOd. and 6 remains ; which multiplied into 
4 (to reduce it to farthings) is 24: then 12 In 24=2 q. 

s, d. 
Thus in 10 6 
12 lOi 
or, by the fkctors of 12, tIz. 2 x 6, or S x 4 ; as in the following : 



8. The foregoing example will stand thus: 

s. d 

In 10 6 

3 3 6 

4 lOi 



«. d. 
In 10 6 
2 6 3 
6 lOi 



So the answer is found more easily than by dividing by 12 ; mueh 
more so will it be, when that number is higher. 



lowb's mnemonics. 153 



RULE OF THREE. 

ALL QUESTIONS IN IT ANSWERED (l) BT ONE STATING (Jt) THE 

SAME WAT. 

{1) Conditional in one line: and, opposite, the terms 

Corresponding. 
(2) -Dend is the -Ducing of one into -Duc'd of the 

other: the Rest-SoR.' 

N. B. No 'Duc^d: the facit of one line divide by that 
of the other.' 



1. i.e. The producing terms qfone line multiplied into the pro- 
du€*d^ of the other ^ give the diyiDsND ; and the rett of the terms 
multiplied together, give the diviSoR; the (]|uotient falls to the 

blank.* (al Producing terms are such as jointly produce any 

effect ; e. g. whatever is considered as a eatue, with the adjuncts of 

timef distance, meature, Sfc. (b) Producing terms are such as 

are connected with the others under the character of pricCj pur- 
chase, produce, gain, loss, interest, advantage, value or quantity qf 

work, ifc, (c) e. g. At the rate of per cent, per ann. what is 

the interest of 200/. for 18 months ? Answ. The terms being 
stated, as they offer (without any other re^rd than Which are 
conditional, and Whicn imply the question) ; Thus : 



Interest 


PriDcipiil. 


Time. 


6/. 


100^. 


12m. 




200 


18 



or in any other order agreeable to the directions in the rule, say 
6 (the produced term of one line x 18 x 200 (the producing terms 
of the other) = 31600 (for the dividend; and (the rest) 100 x 12 
=^ 1200 (for the divisor). Then 21600 + 1200=18, the answer ; 
viz. 18/. 
2. i. e. If there be no produced term (as generally happens in 

the single rule of three inverse) divide the fa^it, &c. e.g. 

How much stuff, yard-broad, will line 10 yards of cloth, yard-and- 
quarter broad ? The terms being stated thus : 



broad long 

4qr8. 
6 10 yards. 



H 3 



say 6 X \0=^'\ 

and 50-i- 4=12{^ 

i. e. 12 yards and |> or V* 



154 



LOWBS MNEMONICS. 



SUBTRACTION 

May be more commodiously performed by Addition^ as 

in the next article. 



TABULATING. 

TO MULTIPLY AND DIYIDB BT ADDITION ONLY. 

1. Twice-double-Multiplicand facitsf every muitiplica- 

tor, -fgives the f, of, 

2. Tabulate Divisor: Quote next digit-under: Subtract 

by Addition. 



1. In the MuLTiPLicATiON-suni (I.) the 
facits of the multiplicand twice doubled^ 
are, as they stand a!gainst the digits 2 and 
4. Then, To multiply the multiplicand — 
iuto 8 (the last figure of the multiplicator) 
double the facit of the digit 4 into 6 



(the 2d figure, &c.) add the facit of 4 to 

that of 2 (= 6) ^into 7 (the next figure, 

&c.) add together the facits of 1, 2, 4 (= 7) 
placing each of them as in the common 
method of multiplication. 

2 In the Ditision sum (II.) (1) Tabu- 
late the divisor, as in the example, viz. 
against the digit 2, by adding the divisor 
to itself; against 8, by adding together 
the totals of 2 and 1 ; against 4. by adding 
the total of 2 to itself, or that of 3 to that 
of 1 ; and, in like manner, in the rest, by 
adding together the totals of any two or more digits, equal to the 
digit whose total is sought. Then, (2) Quote (or, for the quotient, 
take) the digit against the total next less, or under the first corre- 
sponding figures of the dividend, viz. 7565. Then, instead .of 
subtracting, according to the common method, the facit of the 
divisor by (Tiz. 6912) from (7585) the corresponding figures of 
the dlyidend (8) Subtract by addition, and say [not, 2 from 6, and 
there remains 8; but] 2, and (so much lis will make 6, viz.) 8 is 



MuUipli'cand cator 



98765 
197530 
395060 



X 768 
(I.) 



790120 
592590 
691355 



by 

8 



7-§ 
(H.) 



S 75851520 •^ 766 
^ 673794 1686 
'^ 5898 2304 
Q 43 3072 
Quotient (III.) 3840 
987654- 968 4608 
1929 1936 5376 
Quotient 102 6144 
6912 



Q 
1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 



Lowe's mnemonics. 155 

5: then 1, and (as much as will make 8, viz.) 7 is 8: then 0, and 
[what will make 15 (since 9 cannot be taken- from 6) viz.] is 

16*; then, 1, that 1 borrow, and 6 is 7 ; and so on. In the 

DivisioN-sum (III.) it appears that All the tabulating neces- 
sary to find the quotient, is only to double the divisor: for, the 
total next less than (the 1st dividend) 987, is 966: therefore quote 
1 : then (the 2d dividend) 196 has no total less; therefore quote : 
then the next total less than (the 3d dividend) 1965, is (the 2d total, 

viz,) 1936 ; therefore quote 2. ^And, in like manner, may 

be tabulated any sum; by steps, as there shall be occasion. 

(a) N. B. 15, being the last sound in the mouth of the operator, 
does more readily and certainly remind him of what he borrowed, 
than in the common way of subtraction ; which is no small advan- 
tage to this method* 



WEIGHTS. 

TROY WEIGHT, FOR GOLD, SILYER, JEWELS, GRAINS, AND 

LIQUORS. 

MONYERS REDUCED TO BLANKS. 

1 MoN. P^rYt-e/. Dro\iH>kp. mte-abth-udp. Grain- 
dizozy. 



GOLDSMITHS AND APOTHECARIES WEIGHT REDUCED TO 

GRAINS. 

2 (Gold.) Car-^/ Pen-dS. (Ptt.) Scru^dp. Dram- 
auz. Onnce-okp, VMaisy. 



AVOIRDUPOIS WEIGHT, FOR BASER-METALS, BREAD, MERCERY, 

GROCERY, Ac. 

WOOL REDUCED TO FOUNDS. 

3 Cloye-ot. Stone-6o. T5d-eA. Weigh-beid. Sack- 

tauf, hast-Jiiei. 

OTHER THINGS. 

4 PouDd-ounce-a«. Hun-p6uDds-a6e. H(in-Fother-an- 

are: Tun-ez. 



156 lowb's mnemonics. 

HEBREW WEIGHTS, REDUCED TO GRAINS. 

5 Zuza-/f. Bek-azei. Sh«k-I6ei.' MU-ebeizp. TaU 
amnyth, 

GREEK AND ROMAN WEIGHTS. 

^ C Lens-»ifciir^. Lept-atcreA. Chalch-a^r^. Sil- ) ^ 

^ \ t,rU. Oh-aU'trek. j ^ 

fj i Scnpt-akftraf, Dn-lf/mraf, — Sexi-oid,aurp, } ^ 

^ I Sic\\'azn,erp. J ^ 

P 5 Duell-Ao/,itrot. Unc;/ip,roi. Libra- J ^ 

^ \ lefujroi. i ^ 

PROPORTIONS. 

9 Grains £nglish-^,re make French-a2et, Dutch- 
apou, 
10 Ounce has grains Ayoir-ofet, TToy-fomz:* as eiy 

to aii.* 
U Pound Avoir-heavier than Troy by 2 ounces 4 
drams, and 2 scruples. 

Abbreviatures explainedt 

Bekah, 5. Carat, 2. Chalcos, 6. Drachma, 7. 
Duella, 8. Hundred-weight, 4. Lepton, 6. Afaneh, 
o. Obolus, 6. Penny-weight, 2. Pound, 2. Scrip* 
tulum, 7. Scruple, 2. Sextula, 7. Shekel, 6. 
Sicilicus, 7. Siliqua, 6. Talent, 5. Uncia, 8. Zu- 
xah, 6. 

Synonynum 

Gramma, scruple. Keration, siliqua. Lens, grab. 
Litra, libra. Quintal, hundred-weight. Sitarion, grain. 



1. N.B. The Graiiu used in weighing Diamonds^ are somewhat 
lighter than those used in gold, &c* 

9. i.e. S18, according to Bishop Cnmberland: 906, aceording 
to fiither Mersenne. 



LOWERS MNEMONICS. 157 

8, So that the aroirdupois-ounce is less by 48 grains than the 
troy-ounce ; which amounts to near a 12th part of the whole. 
4. i. e. 73 ounces-troy make 80 ounces ayoirdapois 



ASTRONOMY. 

MARCH, 
THE PItST DAT, TO FIND ON WHAT DAT OP THB WEBK IT HAPPENS. 

1. The year, more 2 and eYen-4th, divide by 7: 

2. By what remains (fbr sat. 1 sund. &nd-s5-on) it ia 

given. 



E. O. An, Dam. 26-|-2-)-6 (its even 4th)=84-i-7, remains 6 ; i.e. 
Friday; accounting Saturday 0, Sunday 1, Monday 2, ftc. •— — 
Before Christy reckon backward ; viz. Sunday 1, Saturday 2, and 
so on to Monday 0. e. g. Bef. Ch. 7 4- 2 -i- 1 (its eren 4th) = 10 
-*-?, remains S, i.e. Friday.— Of the other months to find the 
1st day, and consequently what day of the week any day is ; Y. 
Signs. 



MONTHS, 



TBB NUMBER OP DATS IN EACH, WITH THE DATS OF THE NONES 

AND IDES. 

Ap SS N5 June-iz;^ Mar-M& Jttl Oc, NO-p, iD-a/;* in 
the rest, L.aL* 



1. February, it is well known, has 28 (in the leap years 20), the 
Test 81. 

2. i. e. The JNbnes are on the 7th day, the Ides on the 15th, in 
these 4 months. 

8. i. e. The JNones are on the 6th, the icfes on the 18th, in the 
rest. 



158 lowb's mnemonics. 



MOON. 
CYCLE AND EPACT. 



Goiden*B remainder of year-more-1, divided by 19.^ 
Epacfs the cycle into ab: aboye iz by iz, the remainder.* 



CHANGE AND AGE. 



iVeto's the remainder of month-from-march and epacc, 

less iz, auz.* 
Ap. Se. No. Jun. less en ^For Jan. Mar. o. Feb. 

Apri. 1 add. 
FulTa 15 days from the change — Waning, east; Growing, 

west is enlightened.* 



RISING AND SBTTIira. 



At Sun-set, sets New, rises Full; and, each day, minutes 

ub more. 
Shbing (in Waning) Subtract (in Encreasing) Add to 

Sun-rise,-set. 



SOUTHING AND TIDES. 



Southing's the age into ok by 60 : from al, the excess 

take.* 
High-water at London-bridge : Two hours and a half 

after Southing.* 



1. e.g. 1787 4* 1=I7884- 19=19: remainder 9, for the cycle, or 
Golden If umber. 

2, e. g. 9 (the cycle) x II =99 -ff- SO (as being above 80)=9 : 
remainder 9 for the epact. 

8. e. g. May 20 (1787) What is the moon's age ? Answ. 8 (the 
number of the month from March, inclusively) -i- 9 (the epact) 
=12—10=18 : the day of the new moon, when it H said to change. 
So the moon, on the 20th of May, is 2 days old. 

4. i. e. The Horns are turned, in Deereating (from the Full) 
Westward ; in Encreasing (from the New) Eastward. 

6. e.g. April 15 (1787) When comes the moon to the meridian ? 
Answ. The moon's age is 26: the excess above (al) 16, is 11. 



lowb's mnemonics. 



159 



Then II x48=528-i>60=8h. 46 m. for the Southing. For the 

readier working, the rule may be thus expressed : " Age into 4, by 
5 : iwto 12 th€ remainder gives minute§" e. g. 11 x 4==44-f-6=8 h. 
remainder 4 x 12=48^. 

0. e. g. Apr. 15 (1737) the moon Souths at 8 h. 48^ Then 8 h. 
48^ -f 2 h. ^=11 h. 18'. (N. B.) If the total amounts to more than 
12, the excess shows the hour. 



THE TWELVE SIGNS 

Or porHotu of the Zodiac, named from ConttellaHons once in them; their 
names, eharacten, and corresponding months; with a Key to find the 
Sim's place on any day;^ and on what day of the week the first day qf 
any month happens,^ 



1 Ar 

2 Taur 

3 GtoY 

4 Cance 

5 lA 

6 V 

7 Lib 

8 Sc 

9 S& 

10 €& 

11 Aqu^ 

12 Ptecft 



ma 
apr 
may 
jfin 

jtil 
au 

se 

oc 

no 

de 

ja 
feb 



OM / 
k 8 

p e 

P f 

P P] 

P • 

s u 

p a 
k t 
n 8 
ba d 



<Y» Aries 

8 Taurus 

n Gemiui 

® Caucer 

Si Leo 

itjl Virgo 

dOs Libra 

irt Scorpio 

$ Sagittarius 

Vf Capricornus 

ffff Aquarius 

K Pisces 



1. The method is this : To the day of the month (-f II for the 
old style) add the numher signified hy the numerals n, ou, &c. the 
Sun ( — 30, if tiboye 80) is in the degree of the sign corresponding 
to the day of the month, e. g. Feb. 10 + 11 (for the old style) 
+ 1 1 (for the numeral 6a) =32— 30=2" of X . 

2. Thus : From the day on which March 1st happens (V. March) 
for any other month, count forward so many days as are signified 
by the numerals a, /, Ac. e. g. Mar. 1st, 1737, was Tuesday : 
therefore Apr. 1st [counting (fj 4 onwards, Tuesday being one] if 



160 LOWE'S MNEMONICS. 

Friday: and, consequently, the 8tti, 15th, 2sk[, 29th, are Fridays : 
whence may be known the rest. fN.B. Jan. and Feb. are reckoned 
from Mar. of the precedinflf year. ] 



SUN. 

THE TIME or ITS RISING EACH DAY. 

6 J&n-o.' 7 Febr-et. 6 Mar-bp. 5 Apr-ou. 4 M-a«.f 
4 JdUp. 5 Aug-a^. 6 Scpt-ac£. 7 O ..be. 8 No-/.f 

f J UN-da, the Longest, i jfi.^ the Shortest, ei boi, 

DECEM-da.\. 

FOR THE INTERMEDIATE DATS. 

Sought, into 60, by All, gives Min. fewer 1st lioe, 
more 2d.' 

THE TIME OF ITS SBTTINO EACH MONTH, &C. 

Setting's the complement of rising to 12; and^ doubled, 
the day gives.* 

CYCLE AND DOMINICAL LETTER. 

Cyclers the remainder of year-more-9 by ek:^ if 0, ek.^ 
ek cycle's A; ep, B; and so on;^ e'ery 4th has 2' (next 
after these 3ds; d £, au G, a-^ B, bo D, aei F, de A, 

dau C) and 
Former is used till Feb-c2o, in Leap-years; and, after, 

the Latter. 



TO FIND THE SUn's PLACE IN THE ZODIAC, V. SIGNS. 

1. i. e. On Jan. 4, the Sun rises at 8. 

2. i.e. On Jwn.21, New style (which is the Longest day) the 
Sun rises at 8 h. 43'. 

3. i.e. The day sought (reckoned from the day of the Sun's 
rising) multiplied into 60, and divided by the number of AU the 
days between the day of the Sun's rising (specified) in any month, 
and the day of its rising in the next, gives the MinnXea Jeiver (or. 



LOW£'S MNEMONICS. 161 

to be subtracted from the hour specified) in the Ut line ; more (or, 
to be added) in the fid line. c . g. Apr. IS, I would know wnen 
the Sun rises. By 5 Apr-oi* I find that the day sought (reckoned 
from the day of the Sun's rising, viz. the 9th) is 4 [for 9+4=18.] 
Then 4x60=S40: and 240+86 (the number of Ail the days from 
5 Apr-o« to 4 M-ae: i.e. from 9, the day the Sun rises at 6 in 
April; to 16, the day the sun rises at 4 in May^=6' [and 44 i. e. 
by reduction] 40" — 5 h. (the day it rises on the 9th of April)= 
4 h. AS', 20^', then, therefore, the Sun rises on that day, viz. Apr. 18. 

4. Thus, Dec. 21, New style, the Sun rises at 8 h. \7' : the com- 
plement qf its rising to IS is S h. 43^ [for 8h. 17'— 12 h.=Sh. 4S'.] 
The Sun, therefore, sete at 3 h. 43^: and this, doubled, gives the 
length of the day, viz. 7 h. 26^: shorter by 9 h. 8^ than the longest ; 
which (by the same calculation) will be round to be 16 h. 34^. 

5. e. g. 1737 X 9=1746^-28=62 (the number of reyolutions since 
Christ) remainder 10, for the number of the cycle. 

6. i. e. If there be no remainder , it will be (ek) the 28th, or last 
year of the cycle. 

7. 1. e. The dominical letter answering to the year of the cycle 
28 is ij; to 27, B; and so on (backwards) to O, the 7th and last: 
after which returns A, B, Ac. 

8. e. g. Every 4ih (or Leap year*) has 2 dominical letters : the 
latter of which is used after Feb. 24, the intercalary day ; which is 

therefore denoted by the same letter as the 28d. N.B. For the 

readier finding the dominical letter answering to any number of 
the cycle, I have given (in parenthesis) those of every third : thus 
(aei F) F answering to 18 (one of the 3ds there specified), 17 (the 
next 4th, reckoning backwards) will be G A ; 16, B ; Id, C ; Ac. 




year 



162 LOWB'S MNBMONIC& 

CHRONOLOGY. 

SOMAN MANNER OF DATING. 

(1) Kal. Nod. Id. (2) Pridie. (3) Tert. quart: (nb) 

The day sought subtract from 
One m5re th&n Ide-None-days ; Two more thliu thS 

months, f 5r th^ Kalends. 



I. (i. e.) For the days on which the Kalends, Nones, Ides of any 
month happen (V. Months^ write (e. g.) Kal, Dee. on the kalends 
of December, viz. the 1st day of December. (2) On the day pre- 
ceding each of them, write (e.g.) Pridie Kal. Dec. i.e. pridie ka- 
lendas decembris, on the day before the kalends of December, riz. 
the 90th of November. (3) For the days backward, write TertiOy 
Quarto, Sfc, i. e. on the Sd, 4th, ftc. 

II. To find any of the days, e. g. (1) 10th of December. 

What, in the Roman style? Answ. 10 — 14 {One more than the days 
the ides happen o»=4. i. e. 4to id. Dec. Again (2) 4to id. Dec. 
What, in the English style? Answ. 4—14=10 i.e. the 10th of 

December. (1; 20th of November : Say 20—89 (Two tnore than 

the number qfAe days in the moiUAJsslS i. e. 12mo. kal. Dec. (8) 
l2mo. kal. Dec. say 12—88=20. 



LOWE'S HNBHONICS. 



M^HSCO' c'b'WW >-t*Od 



■5, si's I ts^ll a.=:f |§ JKs-i 8:4,4, 









^3, _. — -^ , , H "' S d' "■ ° ^ ^ 






164 lowb's mnemonics. 



TO VIND 



. C The year of the Juliaii period corresponding to any 
\ year in any Era. 

^ ( Any year of any Era by the corresponding year of the 
I Julian period. 

-s C Jul for After add Comm-less-1 ^for Afore 

^ \ take from Comm. 

Er Aftety Comm-Iess-1 take for Corr but 

Afore^ Corr. from Comm. 



.,{ 



1. What year qf the Julian Period is the year 17S7 (1) before 

Christ t (2) after Christ ? ^Answ. (1) 1737 (before Christ) 

— 4714 (the year of the eommencement of the Christian era in the 
Julian period) =2977. (8) 1787 (after Christ) +4713 (the eomr 
fnenceRieDt-^fs-l)==6450, the year of the Julian period. 

2. What year qf the Christian Era is the year of the Julian 

period (1) 2977? (2) 6460? Answ. (1) 2977 (the year of 

the Julian period corresponding to the year of the era sought) 
— 4714 (the conifiiencement of the Christian era) =1787. (2) 6450 
(the corresponding year)— 4713 (the coMmencement-less-l)=1787. 



*FOR THE NUMBER OF TEARS FROM THE CREATION TO THE 

BIRTH OF CHRIST. 

-The Christian vulgar era commences in the year 



of the world 4004, Jan. 1. [according to Helvicus, Isaac- 
son, &c. 3948.] ^The Jews place the creation of the 

world, Later by 242 years, viz. in 3762, Oct. 7. 

The Greek historians, on the authority of the septuagint. 
Sooner by about 1490, or 1500 years, viz. the ecclesias- 
tical, in 5494 ; the civil, in 5509. 



lowb's mnemonics. 165 



FESTIVALS, HOLY-DAYS, FEASTS, &c. 

IMMOYABLB, 
CHRIST. 

N£t-de,c/u.' Circ-ja,6. Epiph-ja^s. Ldmm-au,6. 
HoRood-se,6o. Transf-au,s. 

MARY. 

Ann-in&r,e/. Piir-feb,e, Nat-se,A. yis-jul,e. C6dc- 
de,A. Ass-au,a/. 

SAINTS. 

A\Un6v,iL And-noT,tz. Bap-jun,e/*. Bdrnaby-jaDya6. 
Barth-aug,4/*« George-apr^et. James-jul,c£ic. Innttc^nt- 

John-dec,c2ot. Luke-o^aA;. Mark-£pri,(l«. Mdrti- 

noYemb,ad. 

Mdtt-se,(2a. Paul-jan,(lu. Pet-jun,(2(w. Phil Jaco- 

may,a. 

Sim Jud-o,^^. Ste-de,cfa«. Tho^ec, da, V^entine- 

ieh,af, 

ROYAL FAMILY, 1737. 

i36li-o,ba. PR6cLA-jun,a6. BoRN,King-o,<y; «ei/. 

Queen-mar ,a : seid. 
Wdle8-ja,/y ; pyp. -cess-n,aA. AnOr-o,c2e ; ppn. 

Ame-ma,t2: pab» 
€ar-ma,t2. pdt, Will-apr,a/: peb. M£r-fe,cfe: pei. 

Loui-dj9: pef. 

TERMS, AS IN 1737. 

Terms hold weeks al: days Hilar-e6. East-^. Trin- 
dy^ Mich-tou. 

HiL from j^n-di to ieh-be, Mich from 6c'do to 

nov-eA. 
East, wSd-e dfter, begins : ends, £fter ascension, mond-a. 
Trin, frlday dfter, begins ; and ends 3d Wednesday after. 
Vac, holds weeks tot : ddys Hilar-otf . East-op. Tr-abs, 
Mich-ies. 



166 



lowb's mnemonics. 



QUARTERLY. 

L^dy-mar,e/. Midsuin-juD,6/I Mich-sep,(2ott. Chri- 
dec, al. 



STATE HOLIDAYS. 



Fire-sep,e. Powd-no,Z. Mdrt-ja,<y. R6stor-may,e2^«. 
Revo-feb,a^. 

MOVABLE. 
* BEFORE AND AFTER EASTER.' 

- C Sept-«f.* Sex-US. Shrove-6». Qua-^e. Lent-os. 

^ I Pal-p. Maund-i. Good Fri-d. 

Easter's the first Sunday after first Full-moon after 

March-c/a. 
^ ( Low-o».* R6ga-fu. Asc-m. Whits-on, Trin-faiu 

( Ad-cte. 

EMBKR'days. We Fri Sit, after Qui Whit Ho R6od 

huci-dec,at. 









EA8TER TABLE. 










PASCHAL 


-FULL- 


-MOONS FOR THE 


GOLDEN NUMBERS, 


WITH THE 








HEBDOMADAL LETTERS. 






1 A 


/ 


d 


7 M 


iz 


e 


14 A 


be 


d 


2 M 


el 


g 


8 A 


bei 


c 


15 A 


a 


g 


3 A 


bi 


e 


9 A 


<n 


f 


16 M 


ea 


c 


4 A 


e 


a 


10 M 


eoi 


b 


17 A 


n 


a 


5 M 


ed 


d 


11 A 


bti 


g 


18 M 


•eou 


d 


6 A 


by 


b 


12 A 

13 M 


f 
eo 


C 
f 


19 A 


^boi 


b 








USE OF THE TABLE 


• 









Siim from Hebd6m to Domin (of the year sought) idd 
to the Month's day. 

Synonyms, ^c. 

Ash- Wednesday, 1st day of lent. Candlemas, purifi- 
cation of the virgin M. Crucifixion, good-friday. Holy- 
thursday, maundy. Holy-week, last of lent John the 



LOWE'S MNEMONICS. 167 

Baptist, midsummer. Parasceue, good-friday. Passion* 
week, last of lent. Pentecost, whitsuntide, whitsontide. 
Processioning - day, ascension - day. Quinquagesima, 
shroye-sunday. Shor-(Shur-)thursday, maundy-thurs- 
day. Twelfth-day, epiphany. 



1. i. e. The nodyity of Christ is on Dec. 25, and so of the rest. 

8. i.e. Septuagesima-sunday is fstj 63 days hrfore Easter 

[70 before the octave of Easter]-; X/Ow-sanday is (ni) 7 days 

qfter Easter, and so of the rest. 

3. T\iQ Easter-taJble consists of 5 verses, each ending at a period- 
mark ; and may be read thus : '* One-aid, two-melg, three-d6{ e. 
four-AeS, five-medd,'* &c^ — Its Use is to find Easter-sunday for 
ever. V. n. 4. 

4. e. g. A. D. 1737, the golden number is 9, the dominical lette. 
B., then, against (in the table) the hebdomadal letter is F., from 
thence to the dominical B. are (g a b) 3 ; which added to apr. 7 
(the day of the month, in the table) gives apr. 10, for Easter-sun- 
day. — --So A. D. 1736, golden-number 8, 1st dominical letter C ; 
then from C (in the table) to C (dominie.) 7-1- apr. 18=?i=iipr.85. 



GEOGRAPHY. 

In the following verses (which contain as much, I 
think, as is necessary to charge the memory with by way 
of foundation) I have given the most general divisions of 
the several parts of the terraqueous globe ; beginning, in 
each, with the most northerly parts, and, in descending 
southwards, proceed (to the right)-. fi^m west to east : so 
that children, with a few hints and occasional helps, may 
be able to find them, by themselves, and thereby n\ them 
better in their memory ; after which they will easily get 
the verses by heart, and be well prepared to consult the 
gazetteer, or to go through any system, with pleasurci to 
good advantage. 



168 Lowe's mnbmontcs. 

LAND. 

CONTINBNT8. 
■UftOPE, AIUCA, AtI4, AHD AMERICA. 

AF (8) Bar (f§z mor a ttrn tripo b4rc) Bi (dar) £g^ 

(Uex cair) 
Zair (zn) Ne (t6mb) Nubi (d^Dg) Gni (ma why be 

lo c dog) Ethi (mon caf) 
AM (23) Greea Brit Wa La C£ii Acad Eng Jers 

P^n Mary Virg Car 
Geor Rent. F16r (aug pens) Mex (gu£d me ta j6 

chi guat hon yer) 
Firm (pa ca m&r yenez £nd gra po e6m dari) P^r 

(quito lim chare) 
Am: BrtisY (s^ seba yin) Chil (jd) Para (guai tucu 

plat) Mag 
AS (5) T&r (ft sib che thi) Tiirk (ta na ciird sy di- 

ix) Pe (der isp gomb) 
Ind (mOg Slg beng : yb go bi m^ : pe to si co) Chi 

pek nank ^ 

£UK (18) Nor-^^. Swede-«lociL (Scot-^cTii. Ire- 

diibiin. E-^tmcfen. 
D^n-c^. H51-am<^ Fland-6Hist. Ge-m^. Po-imx. 

Russ-pe/er : France-par. 
SwitZ'banL Hiing-pres6. Port-Zuft. Spain-mud. lULl- 

ro, Tu-con»tant 

AFRICA. 

Barbary comprehends the kingdoms of Fez, Morocco, 
Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli, Barca. Bildulgerid: Daara. 
£)7j(p<; (ch.cit.) Alexandria, Cairo. Zaara: (ch. proy.) 
Zuenziga. Negroland: Tombute. Nubia: Dangola. 
Cruinea: Malaguette, Whydaw, Benin, Loango, Congo, 
Angola. Ethiopia: Monemugi, Monomotapa, Caffiraria. 

AMERICA. 

Greenland^ New - Britain, New - WaleSy Labrador, 
Canada, Acadia or Nova Scotia, New^Englandy New 



LOWE'S MNEMONICS. 1(19 

Jersey^ Pennsylvania ^ Maryland, Virginia, Carolina, 
Georgia, Kentucky. Florida: (ch. towns) St. Augustine, 
Pensacola. Mexico: (ch. prov.) Guadalajarra, Mechu- 
acan. Tabasco, Jucatan, Chiapa, Guatimdla, Honduras, 
Ver^gua. Terra -Firma: Panama, Carthagena, St. 
Martha, Venezuela, Andalusia, Granada, Popayan, 
Comana, Darien. Peru: Quito, Lima, Los-Charcos. 
Amazonia. Brazil: (ch. cit.) St. Salvador, St. Sebastian, 
St. Vincent. Chili: St. Jago. Paraguay: (ch. prov.) 
Guaira, Tucuman, Rio-de-la- Plata. Terra^Magellanica, 



ASIA. 

Tartary: (ch. prov.) Astrachan, Siberia, Chenyang, 
Thibet. Turkey: Turcomania, Natolia, Curdistan, 
Syria including Palestine, Diarbec, Eyraco . Arabic. 
Persia: (ch. cit.) Derbent, Ispahan, Gombroon. India: 
(ch. prov.) empire of the Great Mogul (Agra, Bengal) 
Visiapour, Golconda, Bisnagur, Malabar, Pegu, Ton- 
quin, Siam, Cochinchina. China: (ch. cit.) Pekin, 
!Nankin. 

EUROPE. 

Norway: (ch. cit.) Bergen. Sweden: Stockholm. 
Scotland: Edinburgh. Ireland: Dublin. England: 
London. Denmark: Copenhagen. Holland: Amster- 
dam. Flanders: Brussels. Germany: Vienna. Poland: 
Warsaw. Russia : Petersburgh. France : Paris. 
Switzerland: Basil. Hungary: Presburg. Portugal: 
Lisbon. ^fHiin: Madrid. Italy: Home. Turkey: 
Constantinople. 



CAPES, ISLANDS, PENINSULAS, AND MOUNTAINS. 

CAPES : La Li St.%. Fi Vi-spdin. Bla Ve G6od- 
ajri. C6m-ma/a6. Hor a-fueg. 

I 



170 lowk's mnemonics. 

ISLES : Z}^den. Az-po. Sii Sic Ca Cy-m^c;. Ma Ca- 

bdrb, He-gnL MtkA-eth, 
Maid Ceyl Siim Bo Su Jiv Phi Mo Ladr-iW. Newf-iia. 

B^r^jfSo. Ba Cii Jam Hi Ric, Cartb (dot De mo barb) 

ntex, Fueg-ma^. 
PEN : Jii-dc. Mo-^re. Tre-tdrt. Afri. Cdmb. Malac- 

ind. Mex-amer'nortk, 
MOUNT: Chfevt-«jo*. Tyt-spain. A\ps4t. Cauca- 

t6rt. A palach-»-am. 

CAPES. 

Land's-end» Lizard, Start-point (of) England, Finisterre, 
St. Vincent's, Spain, Blanco, Verd, Good-Hope, Africa, 
Comorin, Malabar, Horn, Fuego, 

ISLES. 

Zealand (in) Denmark. Azores (west of) Portugal. 
l^ardinia, Sicily, Candia, Cyprus (in the) Mediterranean, 
Madeiras, Canaries (against) Barbary, St. Helena, 
Guinea, Madagascar, Ethiopia, Maldives, Ceylon. 
Sumatra y Borneo, Sunda, Java, Philippines, Moluccas, 
Ladrones, East-Indies, Newfoundland, Labrador, So- 
ciety-Isles (in the) South-Seas. Bermudas (against) 
Florida, Bahamas, Cuba, Jamaica, Hispani6ia, Porto- 
Rico : Caribbees (Antigua, Nevis, Montserrat, Barba- 
does) Mexico, Fuego, Terra-Magellanica, 

PENINSULAS. 

Jutland (in) Denmark, Morea, Greece, Precop, 
Tartary, Africa, Cambaya, Malacca, East-Indies, 
Mexico, North- Ameriva, 



MOUNTAIN 



•■>• 



Cheviot (between) Scotland and England, Pyrenees, 
Sp€Un and France. Alps, Italy and France, Caucasus 
(in) Tartary, Apalachian, North- America, 



LOWB*S AfNKMONlCS. 171 

WATER. 

OceanSf Seas, GuJfSf StrcUts, Lakes, and Bweru 

OCEANS : Hyp. EtUi. East. A It- West. Paci-South- 

del Zur. Ice. 
SEAS : Ba de- Swede. Chan-^n^. Me^-eu^Afr. Black- 

en^as, Casp -farfar. 
G ULFS : Bo Vi-swide. Yen^itdl. Hedarab. Pers. 

B4ng. Baff Hu-north-am, 
STRAITS: Sound-6<^/. Gi-med. Uelbla. Ba-re(/. 

SuD-t». H6d-6tt. Dti'baff. Mag. 
LAKES : Lad O-russ, Ne ho-scot. Ge hvL-switz, 

Baba-|}^r«. Bo-nc. 'Pax-Jirm. 
RIV. \6'Cd. Dan-^/fl. Khi-^fcr. Rh Eb Nil-wie. 

T Eu-/)er«, Ga-6e. Mh-mex. 

OCEANS. 

Hypei'borean or northern. Ethiopian. Eastern 
Atlantic or western. Pacific or south, or mare del 
Zur. Icy near the south pole. 

SEAS. 

Baltic, east of Denmark and Sweden, Channel, 
south east of England. Mediterranean, between Europe 
and Africa and part of ^sia. Black sea, between part 
of Europe and Asia. Caspian, in Great Tartary. 



GULFS. 



Of Bothnia and of Finland, in Sweden. Of Venice, 
east of Italy. Red-sea, between Arabia and Africa, 
Persian Gulf. Bay of Bengal, in Asia, Baffin's and 
Hudson's Bays, in North America. 



STRAITS. 



Sound (of the) Baltic. Gibraltar, Mediterranean, 
Hellespont, Black-sea. Babelmandel, Red-sea. Sunda, 
Indian-ocean. Hudson's, Button^ s bay. Davis's, Baffin's 
hay. Magellan, So^k America. 

I 2 



172 L0WB*8 MNEMONICS. 

LAKES. 

Ladoga and Onega, western part of dussia. Loch- 
Ness and Lomond (in) Scotland, Lakes of Geneva 
aid Lucern, Switzerland^ Babacombar, Persia. Bor- 
uou, Negroland. Parime, Terra Firma. 

RIVERS. 

Volga (falls into the) Caspian-sea. Danube, Black- 
M'a. Rhine, German-ocean. Rhone, £bro, Nile, 
Mediterranean. Tigris, Euphrates, Persian - gulf, 

Ganges^ bay of Bengal. Mississippi, bay of Mexico. 



A MORE PARTICULAR ACCOUNT 

of the several countries of Europe may be exhibited, so 
as to give a precise idea of the situation of each sub- 
division, after the manner of the following specimen; in 
which (beside what was proposed in general, note 1) 
such as are contiguous Southward, are joined, as in 
weLa-: such as are contiguous Westward, are hyphened; 
as in Che-De- &c. 

ENGLAND. 
ITS FORTY COUNTIES. 

Nor cum-diir : weLa-y6rk : che-de-not-linc : shr6p-sta- 

le-rut norf : 
H^r-wo-wa-n6rtha : Bed-hunt-camb-suff : mon-gl-6xfo- 

buck*hert-ess. 
Som— wilt— b4rk— middlesex : com—dey— dors— b^mp- 

surrev-kentSuss. 



FIRST MERIDIANS 

ON EITHER SIDE OF TENERIFFB. 

(Cast) London-os. (West) Fer-«f. Jag-«. Nfcol-oi. 
Cory6-hei, "BrM-bou. 



LOW£*S MNEMONICS. 173 

Abbreviatures. 
Ferro. St. Jago. St Nicholas, coast of Brasil. 



The Dutch placed the first Meridian at Teneriffe ; the French, 
since 1S64, at Ferro, two deg^rees west of Teneriffe : others, vari- 
ously, as in the memorial verse. In most of the French maps, and 
those copied from them, two degrees must be allowed on such as 
are calculated on the Dutch plan, to make them correspond ; as, 
for example, Hamburgh is there said to be long, 29** 20' £. conse- 
quently in the French maps it will be found in Sr 20f, and in 
similar manner are all the rest. Many modem geographers usually 
now calculate the first Meridian from the capital city of the state 
in which each resides : the English reckon from the Royal Obser- 
vatory at Greenwich, near London ; the North Americans from 
Philadelphia, situated 75" B' W. from London ; and several of the 
French from Paris, 2* 20' E^ of London. 



HISTORY. 

BIBLE. 

The several Books of it, toith the time of their writing. 

OLD TESTAMENT. 
ITS THIRTT-NINE BOOKS 

Ellh-j5b: dpty.^ Mo-pent: bog. J6sh: boly. Sam- 

ju-ki : bazy. 
Dav: byly. Sol-pro-can-ecc : ath. M6rd-e: toz* 

E'z-chr: ety. Neh: eg. 

FROPHETS. 

J6ii . kse. Jo : eig. Am : peip. Hose : oieil. Is : 

p&uy. Nah: puk. 
Mic: put. J6r: sta. Zeph: dutz. Haba: syn. £z)i: 

loul. Obadi: Ikoi, 
Dauiel : it//. Hag : Uz. Zechari : udz. ATalachi , 

touoi. 



174 LOWE'S MNEMONICS. 

NEW TBSTAX£NT. 
ITS TWEMTT-8BYEN BOOKS. 

Matt*/a.* Mar-o/. Thess-ltt. Pe-ib. Gal Cor R6ma« 

tin, Luke-M. 
Phil Col Eph^s Phile J-kme-se. Heb Act-si. Timothy 

Tit-M. 
Tim Peter-ai^. Jude-pd. Rerel-ous. John-noi 

*doi in iav» 



1. i.e. EUihu is more probably supposed to be tbe antbor of tbe 
book of job^ about 1730 years before the birth of Christ. So, 
A/oses, the author of the p^ntateuch, flourished in the year before 

Christ 1400. And so of the rest, N. B. ^zra is thougbt by 

the Jewish doctors to have writ the cikronicles [the d6th chapter 
of Genesis, the last of Joshua and Jeremiah ; and to have revised 
and settled the canon of the Old Testament.] 

2. i.e. Matthew writ his Gospel about the year of our Lord 41. 
And so of the rest. 

8. i. e. 27 books (from tbe year 41 to 97) in 96 years. 



ENGLAND. 

ITS KINGS, SINCE THE CONQUEST, WITH THE COMMENCEMENT 

OF THEIR REIGNS. 

Will Conq-«a«,' Ruf-Aot. Hen Ist-a^. STfiPH»6i/. 

He sec-6tt/*. 
Rich iBt-bein. John-aah. Hen 3d-cfa«. Edward 

Ist'doid, 
Ed 2d-fyp, 3d-/^p. Hi sec-ipp. Hen Ath-toun, 6th- 

M 
Gth'fed. Ed4th/aM6, 6th, Ri^d-fett. He 7th-/ci7, 

8th- /vn. 
Ed 6th-/^. Mary-/i£^ £ls-/u^. Jamb Ist-^y^ C&- 

Ist-se/. 
Car 2d-s6n. Jame se-sdi. Will MA-sein. Avu-p^, 

GEO'paf, pep. 



LOWfi'S MNEMONICS. 175 

1. i.e. WilRtim the eemi/ueror beg^an his reig^ (accountings the 

year to begin January 1) A.D. 1066. ^N.B. 1000 is omitted 

Ihroughout this list. 



MONARCHIES. 

THE GRAND OR UNIVERSAL ONES, THEIR RISE, FALt, AND 

CONTINUANCE, 

ASS : XWA.M.Hpoife, SaMefti (BAB-i/an, Pers- 

tduboif GrREC-ise/ -h 
Cass-nia*gre. Lys tfarac-be-b6s. Ptolem a6-lib-a»pal- 

sy. Seleuc as.) 

ROM : Jttl-in^if, Jov-otat -h East, West : taken 

C6n-loze, l^om-oiun: 
AIar(A.D.)-o6x AVCifiiL G^ns-ful. Od^ps. Theod- 

0711. Tot-fop. 



f.e. The Assyrian Monarchy begun in Nmus (A.M.) 1748, 

: ad ended with Asfaraddinus in S235 ; being swallowed up by 
the BxBylonian, which ended (with Nabonadius) in 3419, (when 
Cyrus reigned over all Asia,) so the kingdom was translated to 
the PsRsians : from whom (by the conquest of Darius Codomannus) 
in 8617, Alexander translated it to the GREcians : after whose 
death, in 9625, it was (+) divided (after the confusion of a few 
years) among four of his followers. CoMander had mocedon and 
Spreece : X^firaachus had thraee, with those parts of Asia that 
border on the Aellespont and the froxphorus : Ptolemy had ipgypt, 
£i&ya, arabia, jiafestine, and ccclo-cyria : Sefeiitfus, all the rest of 

otfia. The RoMan monarchy begun with Jit/ius Caesar, in 

S909 ; and ended in Jovian in 4i318 : after whose death it was 
(•«-) divided into the Eastern, and Weitern empires: the former 
of which ended by the taking of Cbnittantinople (under Constantine 
PaliBologus) in 6409 ; the latter by the taking of Rome (under 
Honorius) In 4369, A. D. 410, by AlaAc, king of the Goths ; after 
whom it was overrun and ravaged by AttHtL, king of the Huns, in 
461 ; by Oenteric, the Vandal, in 466 ; by OJoacer, king of the 
Heruli, in 476 ; by Theodnne, king of the Ostrogoths in 488 ; 
Totilas, the Ostrogoth, in 647. 



176 owb's mnemonics. 

WAR. 

BODIES OF 80LDIBR8. 

R] Die-by. Cen-^zy, Man-e^. Turm-i^. Cohor-iiM^ 

Legi-aicM. Ph-et/A.* 
£] Comp'UZfOg, Squad-o^^e^r. Ba^lgfeig, Brigad- 

dihfbag. Reg-^,att<A.' 



1. The Roman Legion consisted of (at a medium) 6000 men ; 
though the Dumber was different, at different times, from 8000 to 
(KK$6. And, in proportion, the other bodies, viz. Deeuria^ 10. 
Centuria, 100. Manipului, 200. Turnut, 900. Cohort, 600. 
Phalanx, 8000. 

2. An English Regiment is from 800 to 1000 men. And, in 
proportion, the other bodies, vis. Company, 60-100. Squadronj 
100-200. Battalion, 600-800. Brigade^ 1000-1 100. 



NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. 



PHYSICS. 

ANNUITIES. 
THBIR VALUE, FOR SEVERAL AGES OF LIFE. 

A-6z,c2et.* Az'btfo, Ez-be^pei. lz'ba,pe. Oz-^,jip. 

OUUfOub. 
TJz'Ou^eb, \]\-k,ub, AuZ'oifSy, AiiUau,lo, Oiz-/,td. 



1. i.e. for (A) 1 year of age, the value of an annuity is (bz,dei) 
10*28 years' purchase. And so of the rest. V. Halley, ap Low* 
thorp, vol. iii. p. 669. 



ARKS. 

OF NOAHy AND OF THE COVENANT OR TESTIMONY, THEIR 

DIMENSIONS IN CUBITS. 

(Cov) L-e,rc. Br-d,re. D-a,rt. (Noah) L-tjr. Br-icz. 
D'iz; for Birds-e^, Qu-a^. 



Lowe's mnemonics. 177 

i. e. The Ark— of the Covenant was a sort of Chest in Length. 
Breadth, Depth, 2} : IJ : 1^.— of Noah was a sort of Ship, SOO : 
60: 80: safflcient to hold (with food, &c.) all kinds of Birds (viz.) 
WO; Quadrupeds, 100. Vide Gen. vi. 15. £xod. xxv. 10. 



ATMOSPHERE. 

IT8 HEIGHT, WEIGHT, ELASTICITY, Sec. 

Atmotphere (High miles-6;s') on a foot-square presses 

esauz pounds ; 
On 15 fe^t (for a man) tuns-a/.* when le^st, tun-a,r« 

less;' 
Weighing as 1 to (water) eig to (mercury) 

Qztk eig.* 
C6MPREST, on E^rth, to aipaun;^ by Art, 60 times 

more, to kesboz. 



1. As appears by a calculation, made by M.de la Hire, from the 
crepuseula. 

2. As appears by calculations made from the Torricellian expe- 
riments. V. Jurio, ap Varen. 1. 6. 19. 7. 

8. i. e. The weight of air compared to that of water, is as 1 to 
800, &e. V. Hauksbee*s Exper. 

4. i. e. The common air we breathe, near the surface of the 
earth, is compressed, by the bare weight of the incumbent atmo- 
sphere, into a 18760th part of the space it would take up, were it 
fit liberty. V. Boyle, ap. Wallis. bydrost. 18. Philos. Trans, n. 
181. 



DIVISIBILITY 

OW MATTER, ACTUALLY GREAT. 

By great Effluvia, In a long time, bodies 16se but a 

small weight.* 
Candle, an inch, converted to Light, -*—— gives pdlrts 

a Donillion.' 

13 



178 uowb's mnemonics. 

I. As is evident in perfiinies, &e. 

S. At which rate there mutt fljr out of it, m it bsms, in the 
second of a minate, 418,660,000.000,000.000,000.000,000.000,000. 
000,000.000,000 particles ; vastly more than 1000 times 1000 miliioiis 
the namber of sands the whole earth can contain ; reckoning 10 
inches to 1 foot, and that 100 sands are equal to 1 inch. V. Nleuwent. 
Rel.Phii.Tol.iii. p. 806. 



DUCTILITY 

or BODIES, YBRT GRBAT. 

Micro8c6pical Spiders' spin at-a-time, at least, 

threads- att/A. 
Glass may be dr^wn' as a web, aad knit to the 4th ttf 

a line space.' 
Gold, on Silyer-wire, is drawn^ to the p&rt of an 

inch-6om« 



I. i^. e. Such as are not yisible bat by a microscope. 

9. *'* As fine as a spider's web ; " bat not long enough to be 
woven. 

S. i.e. So, that the tpaee In the ndddle of the icnot shall net ex- 
ceed one 4th of a line, or one 48th of an inch. 

i. ** To the l4HDillionth part of an inch in thinness ;*' and yet 
is so perfect a coTer to the slUer, that there is not an aperture to 
admit alcohol of wine (the snbtilest fluid in nature) nor even light 
itself. Reaumur. 



EVAPORATION 

FROM WATXR, ITS QUANTITY. 



FooT-squttre, hf h^, in a day, evaporates hdlf of a 

wine pint* 
So, Medi tuns-'Udkpn :^ near a third more thanks brought 

by the rivers.' 



K According to experiments made by Dr. Halley, ap Miscell. 
Carlos. Tol. i. To which It may be added, that the winds do some- 
times carry off more than rises by heat. 



LOWE'S MNEMONICS. 179 

S. Estimating the MediterrtMeiA ftt 40 d«greM long, and 4 broad. 

8. V. Rivers ; and, consequently, from tke whole watery sur- 
face abundantly enoogh to fnmlsii all the dews, rains, sp^ngv, 
rivers, &c. that are conveyed into the ocean. 



MAN. 

LIFE, MARRIA08, PARTS, PERSPIRATION. 

Live, out of 4%r, bat--at Ju, so^ — at As, fy — ^t Es, du 

— ^^t Isf hau 
& at Osy dz Sit Usy an & at Aus, % . 

ftt OiSi a. 
Marr. a in &zf:^ bir-/* (to b6r as a^du to a*) m^les-6o 

to fem-a/.^ 
BoNES-eni. MuscLES-/en. Teeth-Ic^ Blood as ag 

to aauy^* 
B^ais, in a* hour, time&-6th: and an 6unte, at a time, i» 

discharged:' 
62 fi^et in a minute; as s^pt-ag to I tn thS extremes.* ^ 
Perspire through pdres (^e^A- whereof by 6iie grain «f 

s^nd may be covered) 
5 pftrts 5f 8 (& dfty's fo6d) from hours 5, after m^ais, to 

the 12th» 3.* 



1. i.e. Of the children bom, out of 100, there are living at 6 
years of age, but 64. And so of the rest. V. Halley, ap. Low 

thorp, vol. iii. p. 669. ^N. B. On observations of tliis nature^ 

drawn from the bills of mortality, is computed the value of an- 
nuitieM for different ages of life. V. Annuities. 

2. i.e. 1 in 104 jlfarrs^. Ring. 

3. i.e. Marriages, one with another, do each produce 4 births. 
Derham. 

4. i. e. BirtJu to Burials are as 1*6 to 1. Derham. 

5. i. e. Males, born, to Females, are as 14 to IS. Oraunt. 

6. i. e. In a body, weighing 160 pounds, 100 thereof are Blood; 
understanding thereby not only the fluid contained in the veins and 
arteries ; but also that in the lymphe-ducts, nerves, and the other 
vessels, secreted from it, and returned into it. Keil. 

7. i. e. 250 pounds in an hour ; at the rate of the whole mass in 
94 minutes. 



180 LOWB*S MNEMONICS. 

8. !.•. The blood isdriTon out of the heart into the great artery 
with a Telocity which would carry it 60 feet Id a minute : a Telocity 
to that of its motion in the remotest branches, as 100 septil lions 
[7th penod] to 1. 

9. within 6 hours after eating, there is perspired about 1 pound 
from the ISth to the 10th scarce half-a-pound. Sanctorius. 



RIVERS, 

THE QUANTITY OF THBIR WATERS. 

At KYngstttn-bridge, Thames (yards Broad-i^, Deep-t) 

2 mile an hour Runs:' 
^uns-esm igth in a day; rh e ti po ni do niest nieper 

akdoim.* 



I. In a day, 4B miles, 84,460 yards ; which multiplied by (3 
times 100, the profile of water at the bridge, tIz.) JKX) yards, gives 
{5,844,000 cubic yards of water, i. e. S0,800,000 tuns. 

8. The most considerable riyers that fall into the Mbditerraneait 
sea are the BJume, Ebro^ Tibm'y Po^ Dawube^ Nile, Don, Niester, 
Nieper. Each of these is supposed to carry down 10 times as much 
water as the Thames, (not that any of them is so great ; but so to 
allow for the other lesser rivers that fall into that sea.) Now the 
water of the Thames being computed, as above, at about 20,300,000 
tuns ; the rivers aforesaid wUl amount, each, to 908,000,000; Ir 
all, 1,887,000,000 tons. V. BTaporatlon. 



MEMORIAL VERSES, 

ADAPTED TO THE GREGORIAN ACCOONT, OR NEW STYLI. 



TO KNOW IF IT BE LEAP TEAR* 

Leap year is given, when four will divide 
The centuries complete, or odd years beside. 

EXAMFLE FOR 1752. 

4 ) 52 ( 0, Leap Year 
13 



EXAMPLE FOR 1800 

4 ) 18 ( 2, not Leap Year 
4 



TO FIND THE DOMINICAL LETTER. 

Divide the centuries by four ; and twice what does 

remain, 
Take from six; and then add to the number you gain 
The odd years and their fourth ; which, dividing by 

■even, 
What IS left take from seven, and ihe letter is given* 



ISi MEMORIAL VBR8BIL 

BXAMPLB FOB 17AS. 

4)17(1 

— 2 

4 — 

2 

6 

4 
52 
13 

— 7 
7)69(6 

1 = A. 



BT THE DOMINICAL LETTER, TO FIND ON WHAT DAT OP THE 
WEEK ANT DAT OF THE MONTH WILL FALL THROUGHOUT 
THE TEAR. 

At Dover dwells George Brown, Esquire, 
Good Christopher Finch, and David Frier.* 

EXAMPLE FOR MAY 9, 1752. 
A bciiiff the Dominical Letter. 

1 May = B = Monday 

7 

8s Monday 
1 

Oc&Tuesday. 



^ See this noticed at ptg e M. 



MBMORIAL VBR8ES 183 



TO FIND THB OOLDEK NUMBER, CYCLE OF THE SUN, AND 

ROMAN INDICTION. 

When one, nine, three, to the year have added been^ 
Divide by nineteen, twenty-eight, fifteen : 
By v^hat remains each cycle's year is seen. 

EZAMFLM FOR 1752. 

1752 1752 

1 9 



19 ) 1763 (92 28 ) 1761 ( 62 

43 81 

6 = G. No. 26 = Cy. S. 



1762 
3 



15 ; 1755 ( 116 
26 



105 
16 33 Rom. Indief:. 



A GENERAL RULE FOR THE EPACT. 

Let the cent'ries by four be divided ; and then 
What remains multiplied by the number seventeen ; 
forty-three times the quotient, and eighty-six more 
Add to that; and dividing by five and a score; 
From eleven times the prime, subtiact the last quote. 
Which, rejecting the thirties, gives th' epact you sought* 



184 MEMORIAL VERSES. 



■XAMPLI FOR 1752. 

4)17( 1 G. No.= 6 

— 17 11 

4 — 

48 65 

11 

172 — 

86 30)44;i 

17 14«=EiiMi. 



25)276(1 



TO IIKD THE EPACT TILL THE YEAR 1900. 

The prime wanting one, multiplied by eleven, 
And the thirties rejected, th' epact is given. 

BZAMPLB. 

G. No. = 5 

1 



4 

11 



30)44(1 

14 = Epact. 



TO FIND EASTER LIMIT, OR THE DAT OF THE PASCHAL FULL 
MOON, FROM MARCH 1, INCLUSIVE. 

Add six to the epact, reject three times ten, 
What's left take from fifty, the limit you gain : 
Which, if fifty, one less you must make it, and even 
When forty^nine too, if prime's more than eleven. 



MEMORIAL VERSES. 185 



EXAMPLE* 

Epact = 14 
6 

20 
50 

30 = Limit. 



TO FIND EASTER DAY. 



If the letter and four from the limit you take, 

And what's left from next number which sevens will make ; 

Adding then to the limit what last does remain, 

You the days from St. David's to Easter obtain. 



EXAMPLE. 

Limit = 30 A = 1 
6 4 

25 5 

28 = next sevens 

3 

30 = Limit 

33 Days 

31 = March 

April 2 Easter Day. 



180 MEMORIAL VERSetli. 



TO FIND THB AGE OR CHANGE OF THE MOON. 

Janus 0, 2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 0, 

8, 8, 10, 10, these to the epact fix, 

The sum, bate 30, to the month's day add. 

Or take from 30, age, or change, is had. 

EXAICPLE, HAKCU 10, \152. 

Epact == 14 

1 = No. of the Month 

15 

10 = Day of the Month 



30 
15 



25 Dayh = Moon's Age. 



15 March » Change. 



TO FIND THE TIME OF THE MOON's COMING TO THE 8OUTB9 
AND OF HIGH WATER AT LONDON BRIDGE. 

Four times the Moon's age, if by five you divide. 
Gives the hour of her southing: add two for the tide» 

EXAMPLE. 

Moon's Age, days 
4 



7 h. 12 m. p. m. == Southing. 
2 12 = High Water.* 



5)36(7h. 
1 
12 m = ^h. 



9 



APPENDIX. 



KEPETES IffOlC; blVK EST VATVKJE HOC, SIVR ART18 

Sat. iT. Uh. 2. 



Horace, in the abo?e words, alluded to the Art of Memory, 
(Mnemooica) more than once praised by Cicero, who has alto 
giren precepts for the improvement thereof, in the third book 
of Rhetoric addressed to Hereonius, where he says, *Uhe Art 
consisted of fixing in the mind, upon certain conspicuous places, 
and on images formed of the things to be remembered and that 
were applied in order to those places ; which last mentioned seryed 
instead of paper, and the images as so many words, whose regular 
application performed the office of writing.'* Quintilian likewise 
mentions Mnemonics in his '* Institutes of an Orator,*' and Pliny 
notices them iu his *' Natural History," though the original inventor 
was the Greek poet Simonldes, who, at a feast, recited a poem in 
honour of Scopas, victor in wrestling at the Olympic games, who 
gave the entertainment; but having digressed in praise of Castor 
and Pollux, his patron would pay only half the sum promised, 
saying he must get the other part from those deities wtio had an 
equal share in his performance. Immediately after, Simonides 
was told that two young men on white horses must needs speak 
with him. He had scarce got out of the house, when the room 
fell down, all the persons m it were killed, and their bodies so 
mangled, that they could not be known one from another: upon 
which Simonides recollecting the place where every one had sat, 
by that means distinguished them. Hence it came to be observed, 
that to fix a sumber of places in the mind in a certain order, was a 
help to the memory. This action of Simonides was afterwards 
improved into an art, the nature of which is this: form in the miild 
the idea of some large place or hnilding, divided into a great num- 
ber of distinct part^, ranged and disposed in order: frequently 
revolve these in your thoughts, till able to run them over one 
after another without hesitation, beginning at any part : then im- 
preit upon your lokid many images of living creatures, or any 



188 APPENDIX. 

other MBsible objects most likely to be soonest re?iyed in tlie 
memory. These, like short-hand or hieroglyphics, must stand to 
denote an equal number of other words, not otherwise so easily 
to be remembered. When therefore you hare a number of things 
to commit to memory in a certain order, place these images regu- 
larly in the several parts of your building: and thus, by going 
oyer those parts, the images placed in them will be re?iyed in the 
mind ; which will gi?e we things or words themseWes in the de- 
sired order. The advantage of the images seems to be, that, as 
they are more likely to afl'ect the imagination than the words, they 
will be more easily remembered. Thus, if the image of a lion he 
made to signify ttrength^ and this word be one of those I am to 
remember, and is placed in the porch ; when, in going over the se- 
veral parts of the building, I come to the porch, I shall sooner be 
reminded of that image than of the word strength. This is the 
artificial memory both Cicero and Quintilian speak of; but seems, 
indeed, a laborious way ; fitter for assisting to remember any num- 
ber of unconnected words than a continued discourse. Grecian 
orators also made use of the statues, paintings, ornaments, and 
other external circumstances, of the places where they harangued, 
for reviving, in progressive order, the topics and matter of their 
orations ; and though among the Latins, Cicero averred that 
Mnemonics were the basis of his excellent memory, and their 
practice was cultivated by others, of whom Hortensius, Crassus^ 
Julius Ciesar, and Seneca, are particularly noticed, yet it is not 
known that any modem orator has made use of this art; however, 
in allusion to it, we still call the parts of a discourse places or 
tapietf and say, in thejirgtplaee^ in the teeond place, &c. 

The science appears to have lain dormant in after ages, till 
Raimond Lull6, about the close of the thirteenth century, brought it 
once more into notice, and it has ever since been called *^ Lull^'s Art.** 

Scepsius-Metrodorus, Cameades, Hippias, and Theodectes, 
among the ancient Greeks, practised or wrote upon this method. 
The principal Romans are mentioned above. The writers upon 
the art, from the time of Lull6 to near the end of the seventeentli 
century, principally consisted of Marsilius-Ficinus« Grataroli, 
Bruschius, Muretus, Schenkel, Martin-Sommer, Horstius, Johns- 
ton, Morhof, and Paschius ; with Gebelin in the eighteenth. 

Muretus declares that he dictated between two and three thou- 
sand unconnected Greek, Latin, or barbarous words, to a young 
Corsican practising that art, who immediately spoke them regu- 
larly in order, and afterwards repeated the same backwards with- 
out any error, asserting that he would undertake to say thirty-six 
thousand words in a similar manner. 

Lambert or Lamprecht Schenkel, bom at Pois-le-Due, in 1547, 
acquired celebrity for his discoveries in the Mnemonic art, and to 
propagate these, he travelled through the Netherlands, Germany, 
and France ; where his method was inspected by the great, and 
transmitted from one university to another. Schenkel brought 
himself through every ordeal, to the astonishment and admiratioQ 



APPENDIX. 189 

of his judges. The rector of the Sorbonne, at Paris, permfttel 
him to teach his science at that University ; and Marillon, Mattri 
des Requites, gave him an exclusive privilege for practising Mne-< 
monies throughout the French dominions. His auditors were, 
however, prohibited from communicating this art to others, under 
a severe penalty. Schenkel delegated the licentiate Martin-Som- 
mer, and invested him with a regular diploma for circulating his 
art, under certain stipulations, through Germany, France, Italy, 
Spain, and the neighbouring countries. Sommer now ( 16J9) 
published a Latin treatise on this subject, under the title of ** Rre- 
▼is Delineatio de Utiiitatibus et Effeetibus admirabilibus Artis 
Memoris." In this he announces himself as commissioned by 
fichenkel to instruct the whole world. 

** A lawyer,'* says he, **• who has causes to conduct, may, by the 
assistance of my Mnemonics, stamp them so strongly on his 
memory, that he will know how to answer each client, in any 
order, and at any hour, with as much precision as if he had but 
just perused his brief. And in pleading, he will not only have 
the evidence and reasonings of his own party at his fingers* ends, 
bat all the grounds and refutations of his antagonist also ! Let a 
man go into a library, and read one book after another, yet shall 
he be able to write down every sentence of what he has read many 
days after at home. The proficient in this science can dictate 
matters of the most opposite nature, to ten, or thirty writers, 
alternately. After four weeks* exercise, he will be able to class 
twenty-flve thousand disarranged portraits within the space of a 
few minutes.** 

The Art of Memory is little more than the art of attention ; and 
this method of it, which appears more connected with Egyptian 
hieroglyphics than has generally been thought, seems to consist 
in nothing else but a certain method of coupling or associating the 
ideas of things to be remembered, with the ideas of other things 
already disposed orderly in the mind, or that are before the eyes. 

Many have been the attempts to assist the memory. Some have 
had recourse to medicine, such as Horstins, Marsilius-Ficinus, 
Johnston, and others. That good health, a good digestion, and a 
mind free from care, are helps in this respect, is an old observa- 
tion. That attention, application, frequent recapitulation, are 
necessary, is known to every one. But whether, besides natural 
health, and parts, and the exercise of our faculties, art may not 
give a further assistance to memory has been a question. 

Within the present century this science has been rt>vived and 
greatly studied in Germany and France ; Dr. Kluber published at 
Erlangen, in the year 1802, a German translation, illustrated bv 
notes, of '* Gazypholium Artis Memoris per Schenkelium,*' which 
the Doctor has entitled *■* Compendium of Mnemonics, or the Art 
of Memory, at the beginning of the seventeenth Century, by L. 
Schenkel and M. Sommer;** but the modern restorer of this art is 
M. Aretin, who exacted from his pupils a promise not to write 
down his lectures ; and though he permitted one pupil, M. Kaest* 



190 APPENDIX. 

ner, to teach at Leipsie, yet it was on the express condition of 
not allowiug* his hearers to write. According to a boolc, said to 
ha?e been composed by a child of tweWe years of age, in the cata- 
logue for the September fair at Leipsic, 1606, Mnemonica may be 
so taaght as to give a memory to individuals of every age. 

In France, the celebrated astronomer M. de Lalande bears tes- 
timony to the following facts: '* I have witnessed the extraordi- 
nary effects produced on the memory by the method of M. de 
Feinaigle : one of his pupils is able to repeat, in any order, with- 
out the least mistake, a table of fifty cities in all parts of the 
world, with the degrees of longitude and latitude in which they 
are situated ; the same is the case with chronology : in the ' Annu- 
aire* I have inserted 240 dates from ancient and modem history, 
and M. de Feinaigle's scholars repeat them all — an astonishing aid 
in the study of geography and history V* 

Neither has this science been unattended to in Great Britain ; 
for, besides Johnston already mentioned, who was a Scotch physi- 
cian, practising at the courts of James and Charles I. Mnemonics 
are frequently mentioned by the great Chancellor Bacon, as in his 
"Treatise on the Advancement of framing;" his "Natural History." 
wherein he states, *' The brains of some creatures, when their 
heads are roaated, taken in wine, are said to strengthen the me- 
mory : as tlie brains of hares, hens, deer, &c. and this faculty 
seetneth to be incident to those creatures that are fearAil.*' In the 
tract *' De Augmentis Seientiarum,*' Bacon recommends theatrical 
action as an assistant to memory, and also alludes to the system of 
Simonides as founded on the theory of emblems, by saying, *' Em- 
blem reduceth conceits intellectual to images sensible, which 
always strike the memory more forcibly, and are therefore the 
more easily imprinted, than intellectual conceits.** In the " Novum 
Organum" the science is again mentioned under the appellation of 
*^ Order or Distribution in respect to places, furniture, persons, 
animals, plants, words, letters, characters. &c." 

Dr. Thomas Fuller, the author of the *' History of the Worthies 
of England,** was also an adept at this art ; he would repeat five 
hundred strange words after twice hearing them, and make use of 
a sermon verbatim, if he once heai d it : after one inspection, he 
told in exact order, both forwards and backwards, the name of every 
sign from Temple Bar to the furthest part of Cheapside. in the city 
of London ; he would write the first words of a number of lines 
near the margin of a sheet of paper, then, by beginning at the head, 
would so completely fill up every line, and without spaces, inter- 
lineations, or contractions, so connect the whole, that the sense 
would be as perfect, as if reglilarly written in the ordinary way. 

The following works were also expressly published on this sub- 
ject: '^ Mnemonica, or the Art of Memory, drained out of the pure 
Fountains of Art and Nature, digested into three books ; also a 
Physical Treatise of Cherishing Natural Memory ; diligently col- 
lected out of divers Learned Men's Writings. By John Willis, 
Batchelour in Divinity, in 1661.** 



APPENDIX. 191 

• 

This aathor'*» methoa commences with rules for rememberioff 
common affairs, next words, then phrases, afterwards sentences, 
and long speeches. The second book treats of remembering 
without writing, next by certain yerses purposely borne in mind 
and by extempore yerses. The third treats of Repositories, in 
which is a print of an imaginary building of hewn stone in form of 
a theatre, where all things intended to be remembered are sup- 
posed to be arranged in order, and he gives various specimens of 
ideas to exemplify his plioi. 

** The Art of Memory, a Treatise useful for all, especially such as 
are to speak in public. By Marius D' Assigny, B. D. 1609.** 

This gentleman's mode begins with a chapter on the soul or 
spirit of man, and in the succeeding chapters, after treating of 
memory, temper, &c. he gives in the sixth a number of receipts 
£or cleansing the hair, comforting the brain, and strengthening the 
memory, by means of plasters, ointments, and powders, and in his 
other chapters proceeds with some instructions for remembering 
words and things ; as, for instance, he states, that '' ethers, instead 
of a house, palace, or building, have chosen such beasts as answer 
to all the alphabetical letters in the Latin tongue, dividing every 
one into five parts, viz. head, fore feet, belly, hinder feet, end tail, 
so that by this means the fancy may have one hundred and fifteen 
places to imprint the images of memorable things." 

Heidegger, who about the year 1740 styled himself Surintendant 
de Plaisirs d'Angleterre, at the Opera in the Hay market, excelled 
Dr. Fuller, by being able to repeat the names of all the sis^ns in 
their due order on each side of the way from Charing Gross to 
A Idgate, a space containing near one thousand four hundred houses, 
most of which at that period had signs. 

Dr. Rees, editor of Ghambers*s Cyclopedia says, *' Mnemonic 
tames exhibit in a regular manner what is to be remembered of 
the same subject. And although the sciences ought to be taught 
scientifically as much as possible, and every thing should so be 
placed as to be intelligible, and demonstrable from what has pro- 
ceeded, yet tables ought not to be rejected, as they are helps to 
retain the doctrines of which the mind has had a sufficient evidence. 
In such tables the properties of things are to be expressed con- 
cisely ; illustrations and demonstrations should be left out, as the 
proposition should have been made sufficiently clear and certain 
before it is registered in the table — hence the contents of such 
tables ought only to be definitions and propositions relative to the 
subject. If a subject require a long table, it may be subdivided 
into smaller, by making first one of the most general heads, and 
referring from each of these to a separate table ; by this means the 
order and connexion of the whole will be preserved. 8uch tables 
would produce a local and artificial memory of great use to the 
retention and recollection of things: they would greatly tend to 
a distinct view of the properties of their subjects, and facilitate 
recapitulation. Besides, as the expressions used in such tables 
ought to be concise, so as just to excite the idea of the object to 



192 APPENDIX 

be remembered, soon after that idea has been acquired; afier 
(some time) a certain obscurity will be found in perusing' the 
tables, which will giye timely warning that our ideas begin to fade, 
and that they ought to be renewed ; and this may be done without 
much trouble, if not delayed too long.'* 

V Men complain of nothing more frequently (says Beattie m the 
* Theory of Moral Science*) than of deficient memory : and indeed 
evf*y one finds, that, after all his efforts, many of the ideas which 
he desired to retain have slipt irretrievably away ; that acquisi- 
tions of the mind are sometimes equally fugitive with the gifts of 
fortune ; and that a short intermission of attention more certainly 
lessens knowledge than impairs an estate. To assist this weakness 
of our nature, many methods have been proposed ; all of which 
may be justly suspected of being ineffectual : for no art of memory, 
however its effects may have been boasted or admired, has been 
ever adopted into general use : nor have those who possessed it 
appeared to excel others in readiness of recollection or multiplicity 
of attainments. The reader who is desirous to try the effect of 
those helps, may have resource to a treatise entitled * Grey's Me- 
moria Technica, or Method of Artificial Memory : ' but the true 
method of memory is attention and exercise." 

A writer in the ''Monthly Magazine'* for September, 1807, under 
the signature of Common Sense, tells us the Art of Mnemonics is 
founded simply on the powers of association in the human mind. 
Every person who has twice travelled the same road, will proba- 
bly have brought to his recollection, during the second journey, 
the feelings of his mind, the subjects of conversation, and other 
trivial incidents which occurred during his first journey, the 
moment he comes again within sight of the successive objects ; 
these recollections will take place exactly in the same order as the 
objects which bring them again before the mind. All that is 
wanted to enable us to retrace any set or succession of ideas, is 
an unvarying continuity of objects with which we can associate 
them. Any person who wishes to try an experiment on this power 
of association, need only make use of the succession of rooms, 
closets, staircases, landing-places, and other remarkable spots or 
divisions of his own house. Let him apply any word or idea to 
the several parts, in determined order, and he will find it almost 
impossible, m recalling the same, not to associate the idea or word 
previously annexed to each part; for example, a person may learn 
the succession of the kings of England in ten minutes, by annexing 
the name of each succeeding monarch to the successive rooms, Ac. 
of the house, regularly descending or ascending ; but any other per- 
manent and familiar class of objects will, in general, answer the 
purpose better. I was educated in the vicinity of Oxford-street, 
and the streets running therefrom, south and north, (beginning at 
Charles-street, Soho-square, and proceeding to Park-lane, and 
back again on the other side to Han way-yard,) are the permanent 
and familiar objects I use for the purpose of successive association. 
The counties in Er.gland, the kingdoms and countries throughout 



APPENDIX. 193 

the world, the villages, and other objects on a great road, or the 
streets of a city, are all well saited to this business of association ; 
and any of them may be taken indifferently by yarious persons, 
according to their acquaintance therewith. The greater the variety 
of ideas connected with this set of objects, which may be called 
the tusoeiaHng ftey, the more easy and certain is the power of 
recollection. By this method I once committed to memory, in a 
single morning, the whole of the propositions contained in the 
three first books of Euclid, with such perfection, that I could for 
years afterwards specify the number of the book on hearing the 
proposition named, and recite the proposition on hearing the num- 
ber and the book; and have frequently, in mixed companies, re- 
peated backwards and forwards from fifty to a hundred unconnected 
words, which have been but once called over. To prove the sim- 
plicity of the plan, I taught two of my own children to repeat fifty 
unconnected words in a first lesson, of not more than half an hour's 
continuance. 



K 



194 CHR0N0L0610AL WORDS. 



CHRONOLOGICAL WORDS 



OM DR. grey's flak. 



rreo<V» ^^^ creation of the world, 4004 years A. C. 

DeXetok, the deluge, 2S48. 

Bahetkeop, the building of Babel, 2247. 

Argono^iou, the Argonautic expedition, 1S50. 

Lycurgouefati, the birth of Lycurgus, 926. 

Oiymjioit, the Olympic games, 776 

Romput, the foundation of Rome, 763 

Sinevtydf the destruction of Nineveh, 602. 

Marathony, the battle of Marathon, 4^. 

Alexanderitott, the birth of Alexander, 356. 

Ipstza, the battle of Ipsus, SOI. 

Gheronitet, the battle of Cheroniea, 888. 

Pharsaloit, the battle of Pharsalia, 46. 

Philippod, the battle of Fhilippi, 42. 

Actita, the battle of Actium, 81. 

Jesit, the resurrection of Jesus Christ, A. D. 83. 

Herculanotn, the destruction of Herculaneum, 79. 

Jerusalotz, the destruction of Jerusalem, 70. ' •i^ 
' Romoaz, Rome sacked by Alaric, 410. ^ 

Romopy^ Rome being taken by Odoacer, 470. ' 

Mahomupa, the birth of Mahomet, 671. 

Mahomawd^, the Hegira of Mahomet, 622. 

Mahom«ief, Mahomet's death, (582. 

JerusaUtoii, Jerusalem taken by Omar, 636. 

Charlemo(/f , the birth of Charlemagne, 742. 

Charlemetj^s, Charlemagne crowned at Rome, 800. 

Alfretottz, Alfred dlvid^ England into counties, &e. 800, 

Canutazap, Canute became king of England, 1017. 

Macbazoy, Macbeth usurped the throne of Scotland, 1040. 

Williaz«au, England conquered by William of Normandy, lOOC 

CrusadazoN^, the first crusade commenced, 1005. 

Henrao, Henry I. commenced his reign, 1100. 

Ghibela^to, the Ghibelines and Guelphs disturbed Italy, 1164. 

Jerusala^ilroi, Jerusalem taken by Saladin, 1187. 

Constantinopla(%cf, Constantinople taken by the French aiid 
Venetians, 1P02 



CHRONOLOGICAL WORDS. 195 

Turkadouk, the Turkish empire commenced under Othman, 1298. 

Btuanockatqf, the battle of Bannockburn, 1314. 

Crecatosy the battle of Crecy, 1346. 

Poicatlauy the battle of Poictiers, 1856 

Otterbo^iiJ^, the battle of Otterburn, 1368. 

Ttimerlqfydy the victory of Tamerlane p.t Angoria, 1403. . 

Ag\ncovir<{falj the battle of Agincourt, 1415. 

Columbq/bud, Columbus discovered Hispaniola and Cuba, 1402. 

Cabotq/bun, Sebastian Cabot landed in North America, 1499. 

Maximil<%z, Maximilian divided Germany, 1500. 

Lutherol&oi, Luther commenced the Reformation, 1517. 

Charla/6oii, Charles V. elected emperor, 1519. 

RhoAalde, Rhodes taken, 1522. 

Pavc^tf, the battle of Pa via, 1525. 

Romo^oi, Rome taken by Charles V. 1527. 

Passaludy the treaty of Passau, 1552. 

Vervo^ouA:, the peace of Vervins, 1598. 

Pragcuez, the battle of Prague, 1620 

Barbadoce/, the planting of Barbadoes, 1685. 

Latzandy the battle of Lutzen, 1632. 

WestphalacoiEr, the treaty of Westphalia, 1648. 

Nimeg5aicpei, the peace of Nimeguen, 1678. 

Reiolaskei, the revolution in Britain, 1668. 

Gibraltopzo, Gibraltar taken by Admiral Rooke, 1704. 

Blenhei5ot3(/; the battle of Blenheim, 1704. 

Malpla&oizoii, the battle of Malplaquet, 1709. 

Dettinopot, the battle of Dettingen, 1743. 

Fonten5o(/tf, the battle of Fontenoy, 1745. 

Mindenap/ou, the battle of Minden, 1759. 

Grenadopoin, Grenada taken by the French, 1779*| 

Bastilopjiroic, the Bastile destroyed, 1789. 

Louisopni, Louis XVI. guillotined, 1703. 

Camperdopnoi, the Dutch defeated off Camperdown, 1797* 

NilopiCei, the battle of the Nile, 1798. 

Seringopnou, the taking of Seringapatam, 1799. 

TrafalgoJl^/, the battle of Trafalgar, 1805. 

RegenaJt&a, Prince of Wales appointed Regent 181 K 

yioscobeibe, the burning of Moscow, 1812. 

yVtiierlakal, the battle of Waterloo, 1815. 

Qeo-fobcidtf^ accession of George IV. 1820. 

NapodeiJa. the death of Napoleon Buonaparte, 18SL 

Will-fob^y, aceefsion of William IV. 1690. 



196 CHRONOLOGICAL EXERCISES. 



CHRONOLOGICAL EXERCISES 

ON AR. ORBT's method OF ARTIFICIAL UElCORT< 



Form memorial words expressive of the era of the buildiii|r of 
Babel, S247 years before Christ. 

The building of Thebes, 140SL 

The building of Corinth, 1880 

The building of Tyre, 1258. 

The burning of Troy, 1184. 

The building of Carthage, 869. 

The foundation of Byzantium, 658 

The taking of Babylon by Cyrus, 588. 

The battle of Salamis, 480. 

The battle of Mantinea, 868. 

The battle of Arbela, 881. 

The taking of Corinth by the Romans, 146. 

The battle of Pharsalia, 48; and the death of Jnlius Caesar, 44 
years a.c. 

The commencement of Trajan*s reign, a.d. 08. 

The commencement of Aurelian^s reign, 270. 

Charlemagne sole monarch of France, 772. 

The battle of Roncesvalles, 778. 

The commencement of the reign of Alfred, 872. 

The commencement of the reign of Canute, 1017. 

The conunencement of the reign of Stephen, 1185. 

The commencement of the reign of Margaret of Norway, 198Q» 

The battle of Angoria, 1402. /» -"^ 

The battle of Bamet, 1471. 

The revolution in England, 1608 

The battle of Dettingen, 1743. 

The siege of Gibraltar, 1770. 

The destruction of the Bastile, 1780. 

The onion between Great Britain and Ireland, 1800. 

The surrender of Alexandria to the British troops, 1801. 



THE USE OF THE INDEX. 



Thb following Index may be useful in two respects : either as 
it will serve to try the proficiency of the learner, who may exercise 
himself in resolving and explaining the memorial words, thus sepa- 
rated from their proper classes, and intermingled with each other, 
(which will at the same time be a means to fix them the better in 
his memory ;) or, as it may be to those who are a little acquainted 
with the art, but have not charged their memories with the technical 
ines, a ready help t^ answer many questions in chronology, geo- 
graphy, history, Ac. without the trouble of searching for them in 
the tables : to make which the easier in the historical and chrono- 
logical part, it was thought proper to add a letter or two at the end 
of each word ; by the help of which, and the beginning of the words 
together, any one, who is bnt tolerably acquainted with history, 
and is master of the general key, will readily know what the words 
stand for. The principal abbreviations are as follow : 



AB. Archbishop of Canterbury, 

Mr, Mn, or epocha. 

B. Battle. 

B. R. Bishop of Rome. 

G. Council. 

Ep. Epistle, i. c. the time of 

writing it. 
Ev. Evangelist. 
E. R. Emperor of Rome. 

E. E. Emperor of the East. 
E.W. Emperor of the West 

F. Father. 

H. Heretic, Schismatic, Ac. 
H. P. High Prisst. 
J. Judge of Israel. 
K. King. 

K. Ass. King of Assyria. 
K.B. King of Babylon. 
K. E. King of England. 
K. Eg. King of Egypt. 



K. Ju. King of Judah. 
K. Is. King of Israel. 
K.M.King of Media. 
K. Ma. King of Macedon. 
K. P. King of Persia. 
K. R. King of Rome. 
K. S. King of Syria. 
L. Lawgiver, Learned Man, 

Author. Ac. 
Leg. Legate. 
Mart. Martyr. 
P. Pope. 
Pa. Patriarch. 
Ph. Philosopher. 
Po. Poet, 
Pr. Prophet. 
Q. Queen. 
W. War. 
= Different Names of the same 

person 



190 THE USB OF THB INDEX. 

Those words which have no letter at the end of them, denote 
some Ikct in history ; as AYtan^, the calling of ABraham. 

The italic letters represent the year before or after Christ. The 
small capitals m and p in the middle of a word denote the year of 
the world, or of the Julian period ; as Troy vUta, &c. 

Be careful to giTe the right pronunciation ; and note, that the 
accent, unless where otherwise marked, or when the penultima, or 
last syllable but one, is long by position, is always on the antepe- 
Bvltima, or last syllable but two* 



INDEX 



10 



GREY'S MEMORIA TECHNICA: 

Oontaining the Chronological and Historical Words. 



PAGE 

Abaneb or Abra9te6 JE». . .5, 6, 7 

Abdona«o J 18 

Ahezyk-boU Pa 16 

•Abimelcte J 18 

Abinitp K. Ju 19, 20 

AhueM & Abp^pnt Pa 8 

Abr&manouf Pa 17, 18 

Actito B 34, IS 1 

Acist Apostles 45 

Adam-crotV Pa 17, 18 

AdntzPa , 16 

Adrifrap E. R 35, 87 

^gial^zAroie K 29, 30 

^gto«K.Ma 31 

Mnedeido & Mnek^ 3 

Mnohvirbale E.W 88 

Mschlel Po 32 

Ag&thtoiij7 L 43, 44 

Ah&bnoXr, AhazlArfrit, Ahazi- 

koup & Ahkzpod K. Ju. 

oris 19,20 

Alaro6z K. Goths 38, 39 

Al-Balftttz K. S 27, 28 

AXbtintyt Mart 10, 11 

Alexanity K. Eg 27 

Alex&ndrotAr Q. Ju 29 

A\ex-Cazka E. E 38 

Alextto K. Ma ix. 80 

•Alex-Srfdrf E. R 36, 37 



PAGE 

AlextisK.Ma 31 

Alfr6itpe K. E 12, 13 

Alpha^in K. Portugal 45 

Amas/aun K. Eg 24, 25 

Amkzkin K. Ju 19, 20 

Ambrofpo F 41, 4i^ 

ATn6n«o«K.Ju 19,20 

Amospeip Pr 21 

An&cloud Po 32 

Anasta/naE.E 37,38 

Ancyr-Neofo/ C 40 

Anc*ip K. R 33 

Ann-chei Q. E 14 

AxmpybQ,E 13 

An-Sabatfli£iSr 9, 10 

Antigonoz K. Ju 29 

Ant-Epi6oi/*Ef]ipaso, Gryp- 

adi'Mtigdee K. S 27 

Ant-Phi6«a E. R 86, 37 

Ant-Pi6ip E.R ib, 

4nt-Sid6t&oz 'Sodoin & 

'TUodauz 27 

Antito6 C 40 

Appi-Tra L 44 

Apride 33 

Apronaunn K. B 22, 23 

Apri*n/'K.Eg 24,25 

Apr=Hoph K. Eg 26 

Aqnddsi L 43 



• This and several other words in the Memorial Lines are con- 
tracted, as Ahmett, Ai-Sedd, &c. &c. 



200 



voces CHRONOLOGlCiE 



AqmbtkU 41,48 

Araaei'Jik Ptu 16 

Arb^pap K. Asf 21, 28 

Arb=Tig. K. Ass 26 

ArbeUib B 81 

ArcheUK.Ju 29 

Arehidad L. 82 

Arcbilomz or Archilochu«J:a« 

Po 82 

ArcioiUE.E 87,88,44,45 

Arg66iiaiip 80 

Aridse^ef K.Ma 81 

Ari86yffK.Ju 28,29 

Arist^dPh 82 

AntelH 6,6,89,42 

ArkpynK.B 22,28 

Arist6b-secauft K. J u 29 

ArnoMye F 41, 42 

Arpbe^otPa 17,18 

Arri-Ant P. L 44 

Antip K.P 26 

ArthlqfK. E 12, 13 

Art-fH>ng=Ahas K. P 26 

Art-Long/oH/* K.P 24, 26 

Art-Mnc^ K. P 26 

Arunfyk AB. « . . 46 

Asami/ K. J u 19, 20 

AsstLTsky K. Ass. & B. ... 22, 23 
A88=Eiiar=AsDap K.As8.26,26 

Asxuno K. M 24, 25 

Asty=AhasK. P 26 

AthfiWkko Q.Ju 19,20 

Athante« or Aihatet F 41, 4S 

Athaul/az K. Spain 45 

A-rhedauz K.S 27 

Athenagora/ip or Athnapp 

F 40,42 

AtlSfia K. Huns x. 38,39 

Aug-Ethel^naw 11 

August/bi7 E. W 37. 88 

Auguste^ £. R 34, 85 

Antful E. W 37, 38 

Auluul K. Eg 27 

Aurepz E. R 36, 37 

Austins F X. 41, 42 

Baanii^ K. Is 19, 20 

Bab-D&r-Ily^ 9, 10 

BkbedU 9, 10" 

BhUPudik E. R 36, 37 

Balsa6otf6 L 43, 44 



Bas^ G 40 

Basili66«H 41,42 

Bas-MaoeJra«p E. E 87, 38 

Bas-Magtou F 41, 42 

Bedtaut L 43, 44 

Belespop K. B 21, 23 

Bel=Bala=Nab K. B 25 

Belibupze K. B 22, 23 

Berodsou L. ^ 43 

BeroJirtb K. Sweden ' 45 

B6ada«p Q. Br 12, 13 

Boleslo^A K. Poland 45 

Bone«a AB 46 

Byzanlis 96 

Chdefly 15 

Cadm^jfno K 30 

C-Ag-Co-Po-Mon«m C. . . 5, 89 

Cutel-naz Pa 16 

CaitspoM Pa 17, 18 

Caliguliit E. R 34,85 

Camby^en K. P 24, 25 

Canih=Ahas K. P 26 

Can6ai« K. E 12, 13 

Candauptif K 30 

CfiT'Gdab E. R 35, 87 

CartLiikqf K. Ma 80 

Car-C-Nud*c E. R 36, 37 

Caro-prini«e^ K. E. 13 

CsLT-sectok K. E ib, 

Car-chep-riz K. E 14 

CasibelMrf 12, 13 

C&ss-raagre K. M 31 

Catilaud 34 

Cecblus K 29, 30 

Ceh^uz L 42 

Ceraunee2K.8 27 

Cerinthm H 41, 42 

Ch&ULe-Mar-Eudioto C. . . 5, 39 
Charlemet^ E.W.....11,37,38,45 

Charopptto Arcbon 30 

Chartee^ 14,15 

ChichfalAB 46 

Cbi-Po-Jugpc* 22, 23 

Chlo-GaUye E. R 36, 37 

ChrU'Mdndiothf JE 8, 130 

Cbris-Peri/oifto M 8 

Chrysotoitit F *. . .41, 42 

Chynfop K. Ass & B 22, 23 

CimbatW 34 

Cle-k-aloud P 42, 43 



BT HISTORICiB. 



201 



Cle-p-utoip P. 42,43 

Cleopatto Q. Eg ix. 27 

Cl^Komaii/F 40,42 

Clem- A16xan« F ib. 

desk E.R 36,87 

ClaodE.R 35 

C\6\okaK.F 10,11 

Co-Da-Th6-Matet6, & Co- 

Vi- Jfist-O/M* C 6, 39 

Codomatew K. P 25 

Codrdzpa K. Athens 30 

Col-E-Ph-Ja«« £p 45 

Colum&on^ II 

Comin6d5eiz E. R 35, 37 

CompiUze U 

Conf6^« K. E. Pa. 12, 13 

Constantinofr^Zt 1 1, 38 

Const- Arctou/ E. E 44, 45 

Constfqf'C 40 

Con%» E. R 86, 37 

Co-Co-Consttp E.R ib. 

Consu/zot 33, 34 

Contractod & Contraq/od ^r. 7 

Con-taiEr 131 

Cop^rnicfl/oif L 43, 44 

Corinth-Kiep Ep 45, 46 

Creo«eiz Archon 80 

Creppaz Mr 8 

Croes^w K x. 30 

Croisdznu 11 

Crom-moTsuk & Cromsli ... 15 

Croti^f Mr 6,6,7 

Ourt-Vesp L 44 

CytLXSLsifK. M 24, 25 

Cy-d-lunK.M ib. 

CypreUc F. ft Mart 41, 42 

€>T-Alexd6e F ib, 

Cyr-JUz F. 6i Mart ib, 

CyrlisMr 7 

Cyr-Mimtouk Mr. 8 

Cyr-Po5oi*iEr... ib. 

Cyrut8K.F ix. 5, 6, 7, 24, 80 

Dar-Hysta^a K. P 24, 25 

Dar-Med/iil K. B 28 

Dar-Nothoc^i K. P 24, 25 

Dar-M=Cy a K. M 26 

Danw^Pr 21 

Dayaztt/ K. Is 10, 20 

VehodeUPr 18 

Decemvoljf 88, 84 



DecidonE.R 86,87 

Dej=Arphax K. M 26 

Dejopzou K. M 24, 25 

D€\etok Mr 5, 6, 7 

Del'Masus & -VHsau Mr. . 8 
Deni-Nic<si/i«, -^\zaty& ^d,se 

K.S 27 

Den-OlaAzou K 45 

DiaJa;? E. R 83, 37 

Diconoi 38, 34 

Did-Juli-Saw* E. R 35, 37 

Di-Halic-Aug L 44 

Diocl^seAro Mr 7 

Dio-geniBr 181 

DiogefetPb 32 

Dio-Maxdc(/ E. R 36, 37 

Disp-JudjKi ^r 10, 11 

DoraitikaE. R 35 

D6natem H 42 

Dracs^ or UrMio L 82 

Ecclesi-Paxf(u2 10, 1 > 

Ed-prinicZot(2, -set^/p, -terte^, 
-quar/auz, -fi-Ro)!ft& -sex- 
to* K.E 12, 13 

Ed=Nd»-loi-r^^cho-pou-reifc 

K.E 14 

Edmundi« AB 46 

EgbeArdl K.E 12, 18, 45 

Ehute/ J 18 

Elefidma H.P 28,29 

Eliasho/eH.P ib. 

Eli6i»pH.P. 18 

El-nop Q.E. ..; 14 

ElntzK.Is 19,20 

Elo6ot/ J 18 

Elz/uiirQ.E 18 

Enapftd=Balad K. B 25, 26 

Empea K. B 22, 28 

Ench«^d-tnc Pa 16 

Encha&e Pa 17, 18 

"Exidil-nyl Pa 16 

Eng-Egbifcdl K. £ 45 

Enostpaitn Pa 17, 18 

Eph-Ce-The-N6^5 C. . . . 5, 89 

Eph-Ja<e Ep 45, 46 

Eph-Syrtotz F 41, 42 

Epicad'iNi Ph 32 

Epiph&nuiirF 41,42 

Erasmuto L 43, 44 

Esarhadopzan K. Ass 21, 28 

K 3 



M2 



VOCES CHRONOLOOICiE. 



EiarsaAf nap K. Ass 96 

EsthotaQ 10 

Vthel^noii K.E 11 

Ewngteiz K 41, 4S 

Eiu/mK.E; 96,87 

Euclozaw L 82 

KviUaub K.B 93 

Kanom\tauz H 49 

Eu-Pam/o/F 41,49 

Earymedopz B Si 

EuiTonfek L 48. 44 

Ex4/iia ^r d,6, 7 

Exridet A ExuiUU JEr 8^ 

Ezeloul Pr 91 

Ezrolk 10 

VergHd R. Scotland 45 

Fil-cons^tp B. R 86, 87 

Flav-Cleiit E. R ib. 

Flor6n>i G 40 

FoU 88 

Fran-Pharom^V K 45 

Fredbdap E 



way 



0&-Go-Rkp Ep 4«, 46 

Qa\bot L 48, 44. 

Galbaiw E. R 85 

Oalb-Othofow E. K ib. 

Qalerttft E.R 86,87,44,45 

Oalila](/e L 48,44 

Gallienrfawz B. R 86, 87 

Oall-Voltui/a E. R ib. 

QaXup Bp 45, 46 

CttLUgtoz C 40 

QeMaoneP 49,48 

QeXaad L 43,44 

Qennful K. Vandals 80 

Qeopbihpdoi-pauZ'kez K.. E. 18 

6eor-ga-ja6 K. E 14 

Qer-ChtirXmeig E.W 45 

QerizSzei 10 

Getdofr E.R 85,87 

Gibrapzo 15 

QidedolJ 18 

GildtupL 43,44 

God-Bulitott K 14, 15 

Gor^b'it E.R x.8a,S7 

Qmcchade 84 

QnnitifB 81 

OratoMa L. 48,44 

&rUoUE.W 87, 



QreC'Cec'lonf & Gree-cifil- 

nlzou Mr. , ISO 

Qrego-bi-bUpe P 48, 43 

Grego-Naztotz F 41, 42 

Greg-Thaume^/* F ib. 

QrypadiK.^ 97,98 

Gunpd{/b II 

Habetyn ft Hag^s Pr 91 

HalicAogL 44 

Heb'oped'dgo Pa 16 

mbdeka Pa 17,18 

Hebffi Bp 45,46 

He\idaj}4c E.R 85,86 

Hen-g^-te'-an-sez-chfz-gifr- 

ged'pedK.E 14 

Heng/tUK 19,13 

Hen-quarfrzw t E.W 88 

Hen-Stetoj L 48,44 

Hen-pra$r, •96cbi{f, -tlufo*, 
'fotoun^ 'f^fdd, 'Bifed, 
.s6R/et7 & -oclyti K. E. . 19, 18 

Hercuiodo^ 80 

Hermogapif H 41, 49 

Herm-Pasta«^ F 40, 49 

HerodflrK.Ju 99 

Herodo/«< L ix. 43 

Hesychi/bim L 48, 44 

Hezepep K. Ju 19, 90 

Hierocl^:e L 49 

miari(^F 41,49 

Hippar5«e L 43 

Holof4f{« 9,10 

Ifoimia^ Po 89 

Honorfni E.W 87,88 

Hoseplru Pr 91 

Hospiz or Hosepte K. Is. . • 90 

Ho8til<^K.R 83 

Uybaboid 11 

Hygalo P 44,45 

Hyrcatu H. P 99 

Hyrca-secondfi H. P ib, 

J &cobf 5a«J:-6op Pa 16 

Jaduto6H.P 98,90 

JnSdaz J 19 

JakipPzi 17,18 

Jamaicau/I 15 

Jamae Ep 45,46 

JaxiuK{f&'»ifdK»E 18 

Jam-cb^-loii K. £ 14 



BT HTSTORICiE. 



203 



Jai»»K.E ix.8,12,13 

Jojonazu H. P 29 

JtLrSfif-naud Pa 16 

JanYe/Pa 17,18 

JasbaUH.P 28,29 

IbzflJfce J. 18 

JehoaashAroifc, -hoahaklau, 

-hoashjrtn, -hoiakau^, & 

-hoiakimfvn K. Ju. or K. 

Is 19,20 

Jehoitisys K. J 9, 10 

Jehorkein, -hosaphanfto & 

hukko K. Is. or Ju 19, 20 

JephtakkJ 18 

Jeromtot* F 41, 42 

JerobHot^ K. Is 9, 10, 19 

JerO'Sekdu K. Is 20 

JeratoPr 21 

JeshtLfdu H. P 28, 29 

Ignai>2o F 40, 42 

Inahu K x. S, 29, 30 

Incendifci 34 

Inqmaded 14, 15 

JotMkqfP 42,43 

Joelc^Pr 20,21 

Johan&Dtpt H. P 28, 29 

JohnpEv. & Ep 45,46 

John-p<K.E 14* 

Joiadoo^, Joitikokty & J6na- 

5a«3H.P 28,29 

JonitxePr 20,21 

JorXmawK.Is 20 

Jorn- Jast L 44 

Jos^phaiip L 41,42 

Jos^phofi^ Pa 9,10 

J68yW J 18 

Josia«02 A Jothpidr K. J a. 19, 20 

JoYtoi(/'E.R S6,87 

Irenoip F 40, 42 

Irfinpoup E. E 37, 38 

IsakousPti 17,18 

Isebyk-beiz Pa 16 

IsleptottdAB 46 

Isaipa«2 Pr 21 

Isreto 9,10 

UUU B 31 

ItalrfnW 34 

Ital-Odops K. Ital y 45 

Judipand Mr 130 

JuAoMk 0,10 

JadpoEp .. 45 



Ju/«E,R .' 44,45 

JugpesK.B 22,23 

JugubzouW 34 

Julio« E.R ix. 30, 34, 35 

JuWant E. R 35, 37 

Julito E. R 36, 37 

Ja-Maccaba«« H. P 10, 28, 29 

Jaatinllep E. E 87, 38 

JusllakE,K ib. 

Just-Mar5o3 F 40, 42 

Laborosoarch^u/ K. B 23 

Lacran^^e F 41, 42 

Laert5op L 43, 44 

L^mibiz Pa 17, 18 

hamkolf'poip Pa 16 

r^nghi«j7 AB 46 

La6di*oC 40 

Ltigti/o K. Eg 26, 27 

lj9Xbid'in.'oU'dal-lap C. . . .39, 40 

h-az-blat P 42, 43 

Lathyracfz K. Eg 27 

Le-Upap E. E 37, 38 

L6a/oiE.E ib 

Leo-MoffP 42,43 

Leo-Pheiks E. E 38 

lAiYapus 17, 18 

Leuctrafpi B 31 

LibertleP 42,43 

Ucimtet E.R 36 

h\nadka Po 32 

Ling-LaUeip 10, 11 

Lo\€Uub 11 

Lombalk L. 43, 44 

Longfai^fK. P 24,25 

L6ci5iipK.Br 10,11 

Lukau5 Ev 45, 46 

Lycargne« L 82 

Lycophrepz Po ib. 

hyodiil'doif C 49 

Lys-thrachebos K 81 

Macctop E. R 85, 87 

MacartptF 41,42 

Maha1a<jy»Pa 17,19 

MahtiiBitoul'koul Pa 16 

Maho-la*JEr 181 

Mkhomaudd Mr ix. 7 

Mkhomsed Mr 7 

Majoro/p E.W 37, 88 

Malaehlnp Pr. 21 



204 



VOCES OHRONOLOGlCiE 



AUr-UQ.E 14 

MMokisepa H. P 2S, 29 

MBntMoutJLJu 19,20 

MancppH 41,42 

Manethfiiry L 43 

MantuiB SI 

Marath^nz B x. 31 

Marc^z H 4 1 , 42 

Marco/z E. E 87,38 

Mard<Em|}ea K. B 22, 23 

MtLtkot E¥ 45,46 

Mar-Luthtop 15 

Mary/«C Q. £ 13 

MaaaoieUop 15 

M aM-Paro/ouf ib. 

MatVo Ev 46,46 

HtA'Av'iful E.W 87, 88 

MtJLetu E. R 80, 37 

|laximic/e(/'E. K ib. 

i/iedazaiz Archon 80 

Menaiipe K. Is 20 

Meneidpe H. P 28,29 

Mephtek Aa 46 

MerlopoiL 43,44 

Meseuoud K. B 22, 23 

Mess-primpof W 30, 31 

Mes8-sec«At« W 32 

Methu«^tp-na«i» Pa 16 

Metbus^op Pa 17, 18 

Micha-Palad«a E. E 38 

Micpvt Pr 21 

JMin-FdezF 41,42 

MW-irihfoud 88,34 

Mithridati-ott W ib. 

Misdakk 9,10 

Mnemojif K. P 25 

M<56Ev 45,4(> 

Montdpe H 41, 42 

Mos-mo.'a, or -dola Pr IS 

Mund-octoi JEv, 131 

Nabonad=BeIsh K. B 26 

Nabonad/u^ K. B.. 23 

Nabon&spop iEr 7 

NabopoUeZ K. B 23 

Nab-f^* Mr 131 

Nadipi/ K. B 2 1 , 23 

Naditiyr R.Is.. .-. 19,20 

'Nahor aki5n'bok Pa 16 

Nahorrfo/i Pa 17, 18 

hkhwoaplei 21 



Nebtyt K.B SS 

Nech=Necus K Eg 26 

Necussiw K. Eg 24, 25 

NehemijfMPr la 

Neo/o/C 40 

Nerig/wn K. B SS 

Neni/E.R S5 

NerYoic«E.R 86,87 

Vic-Sil-Con-Ariee/ C. . . . 6, 89 

Ninez^ott K. Ass 20, 80 

Nln6T*ad 9,10 

Noachaz^«-iiiiz Pa 16 

Soenok Pa 17, 18 

NoYttduaH 41,40 

NainecUre E. R 86, 87 

Numpq/'K.R 38 

ObadittofPr 21 

OchWfcK.P 26 

Odoacopf K. Heruli 89,46 

OMibiss K. Thebes 80 

Ogygapaus flood 29, SO 

Oiaukzou K. Denmark 46 

Olmteeii: JEr 8 

Oly-JanMr 131 

Olympinik Mr 8 

O\ympois Sf quoit Mr 7 

Omnel K. Is 20 

OokelArot L. 43, 44 

On-primida, -sdvz & 'tboul 

H.P 28,29 

OrigetzF 41,42 

Ori-6aU^£.E 44,45 

Oro-Mag K. P 21-, 25 

Oroz-Theo L 44 

Othdip Leg 46 

C)th-Magnt# E.W 37, 88 

Oth6bdattiir Leg 46 

Otho«ott E. R 85 

OthdzuJ 18 

Oitadoup Turk-Sultan 11 

Otiomadnoi Sultan 44, 45 

Papoaz H 41, 42 

Pap-Avatj^/ 11 

Pau-Samefa«z H 41,42 

Pausaeo L 43, 44 

Per>Lambeto AB 46 

Pec-Readdotn AB ib 

P^t B.R 44,45 

Pekaipsa & Pekaj^un K. Is. SO 



ET HISTORIC^ 



805 



PeltLgidzu H 49 

Pelapiip-etou Pa 16 

PeUgedopPti 17,18 

Pey & P€'3ecaup £p 45 

PelqfibW 81 

PertmaneE.R 35,87 

l^er t- Juli-Sant E. R ib, 

P6rsa<a£ K. Mycene 30 

Celrattu L 43,44. 

PhBdkoK.Eg 90, »7 

Pharamddy K. France 45 

Pharsop B 34 

PhWde^K.Bg 96 

Phil-Nad JEr 131 

PhilteoMr 7 

Philip<?f E. R 36,37 

Phi-Col-Ep-Ph- Ja«e Ep. . . 45, 46 

Phil-Jq/y U 41,42 

PhilidoMc 7 

PhiIipo6B 34 

Philipiie K. Syr 27,28 

PhiUcEp 45 

PhocUp W : 31 

Phocauze E. E 37, 38 

Phra*/oM K. M .24, 25 

Pintt/'fizPo 32 

PifitokFh ix.32 

Plut-Appi-Tra L 44 

Pol-BoloM K 45 

PolycsLTdzei F 40, 42 

Porpes K. B 22,23 

Port-Alphaftm K 45 

Porphej]^ L 42 

Powdsvl 15 

Prinq/on 1 1 

PnH'bS-skei K,Bg 24, 25 

PriscUpa H 42 

Pt'iscsqf K. R 33 

Probdoit E. R 36, 37 

Proco^ip L 43, 44 

Promadcoi 29, 30 

Prosp-Oros-Theo L 44 

Protalen 15 

PrudmpL 43,44 

Psamniatf^, PsaminiUe/, & 

PsamiUpj^ K. Eg 24, 25 

Ptol-Geogrq/z L 43, 44 

^ol-8Blibapalsy K. Eg 31 

Ftol - AlexanAry, -Aulaif^, 
-Epiphezo, -Euergefos, 
-Lagl^o, • -Lathvrods 



-Phad&o, -Philopheefr, 
-Pboiii6etz & -Physcoj^tf 

K.Eg 26,97 

Pu-Baldift E.R 36,87 

Pnn-eH-dat-bok W 84 

PuroU 10 

Pyrdotft W 84 

Pyth&g/yt Ph 39 

Ralbag & Rambam L xIy. 

Reg-Babyl^zotf 98 

Regibnu K. B 99, 98 

RehonoU K. Ju 19,90 

Reuapeip^in Pa 16 

RetiedapPtL... 17,18 

Revnaw 45, 46 

RicardisAB 46 

Ric5etn, Ri-seMtp & Ri- 

teroktK.E 19,18 

Ri-l<-jc6-ed K. E 14 

Rob-Steph/un L 43,44 

Rom- Ja/« 44, 45 

Romiiid«5 and Rompimta 

Mr 8,83 

RomputK.R 7,88 

Romifp Ep 45 

Ro-pda ^r 181 

Ruftnz L 41, 49 

RufiroiK.E 19,18 

Sab=So K. Eg 95, 96 

Sabacopdot K. Eg 93, 95 

Salam^fry B 31 

Sti[cLsout-ott Pa 16 

Saldi56Pa 17,18 

Salm=Ene=Shalm K.Ass. 96 

Salinptf& K. Ass 9, 10 

Salmpeilr K. Ass 91, 98 

Sambap H. P. & Pr 18 

Samnt/e W 34 

StinchabofU L 48 

Sa6s=Nabu K. B 26 

Sa6s«aup K. B. & Ass 99, 98 

Sapphff^d Po 89 

Sardanpop or paup K.Ass. 99, 30 

Sardine 40 

Sardu^ 9, 10 

Satd% K. Crete 30 

Sauldzni* K. Is 9, 10, 19 90 

Scander5(2/ie K 11 

Sco^Fergt^dK 45 



206 



VOCES CHRONOLOGlCiS 



AecPe'Timaup Ep 45, 46 

Seleuc-ftsK.S SI 

SeleucoMC, Sel-Cal<(/%, 
Cerauiwd, - NUad & 

.PIuii»K.S «7,28 

Semiramaul Q. Ass 29, 90 

8eonachoi6o K. Ass 21, 23 

8en=:Sarg K. Ass 26 

Septepoi 10 

Serakdti-diz Pa 16 

SerCkgdaku Pa 17,18 

8ery«pffK.R 83 

8eth-4ey-nad Pa 16 

S^thOroi/'Pa 17,18 

8e¥6raiUR.R 85,37 

SevponK. Eg 23,25 

8eF=8eth K. Eg 26 

Shalloppe K. is 20 

SheJ^Pa 17,18 

Shembulk'aujf Pa 16 

8id6tfroz K. S 27,28 

Sil-It&l-Nero L. 44 

Qim»Jiff-MtiCcabot, A -sec- 
dap H. P 28,29 

SisjphdlzoK 29,30 

BmalcaUos 15 

8merd=Art K. P 28 

8oeHf»»Ph 32 

S6d'Gakoup 9, 10 

BoXomdzal K. Is 19, 20 

Solun Ph ix. 82 

Sophoclozoi Po 32 

8p-Al»i/a2 K 45 

Sp-inyuiirit 15 

S-Qaino/ei^P 42,43 

Stat-consularoffo 33, 34 

Stnt'Tegdol 33 

Stepb5i/K.E 12, 13 

8teph-da K. E 14 

Htephede AB 46 

Strab-TibL 44 

Stratfotod AB 46 

Sudbutotik AB ib. 

Saper^id K. R 33 

Swed-Beroitt'6 K 45 

Syl-dictm 34 

Symmachezfr L 41, 42 

Taeldotf E.R 36 

TacUdz^ L 48, 44 

Tam-Baja^^wM M 



T4mbsfheJEr 5,6,7 

TemM^iMC & Temptpie ^r. 8 

Tarakolk-difl Pa 16 

Tereftei Pa.... 17.18 

TertuloMdF 40,42 

Teuebuzd K 30 

ThaumetTF 41,42 

Thebadeiyr 30,31 

The6crdtii Po 32 

The6doii< K.Ostro-Goths.. 89 

Theod6tajm L 41,42 

Theo-J6Dozet E.E 37,88 

Theo-Magto»i» E. E ib. 

Theoph-AntotlE F 40, 42 

TheAdif SO 

Thesfo-C Ep .^,46 

TholfttJ 18 

Thom-Aquodn L 48, 44 

Thuauap L ib. 

Tiber6«£.R 34,35 

TrbfMiiK. Is 19,20 

TigrkneU K.A .....27,28 

Ti'TimsUf Tim-secottp & 

Timom Ep 45, 46 

Tirhapj^; K. Eg 24, 25 

Tirh=Tara K. iEth 26 

Titfn Ep 45 

TitpouE.R 35 

Toxlop K. Ostro-Goths 36 

TrajanJ; E.R ix.85,37 

Treaialol G 40 

Tren-deca^Hi{/« G 15 

Trib/imd 83,34 

Trii»n 84 

Trduekeb JEr 8 

Tr6yabeU Mr 7 

Troy-jo* ^r 181 

Troypftta Mr 8 

Turk-Ottoroflk/fiot 44, 45 

Turnlaul & Tychfrfot L.. . .43, 44 
Tylito Id 

Valentoctj^ H 41,42 

Val6rfK E. R 36,37 

Val(en)tinito«/&VaIeiit<kIo 
E.W.ValwoE.E.&Val- 

stiWE.W 37,88 

Vespoiz £. R 35 

Vientoa G 40 

Vitell©«z E.R 35 

VitruFlul L 44 



£T HISTORIGiB. 



2Ki7 



Ulp-Se? L 44 

Un-Ptotn 16 

VolvLdla E.R 36, 37 

Vortigfos 12,18 

Vicl-Acto-sc JEr 131 

XJrb-S'CXe-jh-atoip P. P. . .42, 43 
Uz-AzarUr£y K. Ju 19, 20 

WaltedAB 46 

Wil • consau, Rufilroi, & 

MseikK.E 12,13 

WiUibd'Stm'fat K.E 14 

MVinchtifi AB 46 



Xen6philou Ph 32 

Xerxoiti«K.P 24,25 

Xer<f-SogK.P it. 



Yezd-JosiEr 131 

Ytuid Mr 7 

Zachara|?pt K. Is 20 

Zehbel K.S 27,28 

Zechar^c/z Pr 21 

Zedekilnei K. Ju 19, 20 

ZetUetfc 9,10 

ZenobdoidQ 10,11 

Zenojpo E. E 37, 88 

Zepbauez Pr 21 

Zim-Tibn€n K. Is 19, 20 

Zonsinbbak L 43, 44 

ZorotJ^He 10 

Zost/W L 42 

Zosoop 42. 48 

Zos-Theo jun L« 44 



THI 

CONSTRUCTION AND USE 

OF THB 

GEOGRAPHICAL WORDS. 



Of words consUting of two parts in the same character, joined 
with a hyphen, the first part denotes a city, town, people, &c, in 
a kingdom, region, or province, denoted by the latter : the words 
in Italic letters signifying places in ancient Geography, the words 
In Raman letters, places in modem Geography. Thus, Ahdir- 
thra; Abdera, a town in ancient Thrace. Aginc-art; Agineourt 
in ArioU, 

Words in a parenthesis denote that the place represented by the 
first syllable or syllables, is one of those represented by the latter, 
as (Antig-lee) Antigua^ one of the Leetvard Islands ; (Gub-antj 
CubOf one of the Antilles. 

The letters N. E. S. W. either following or in a word, denote 
the situation of a place ; as Antill-luc S. the AntiUes Islands, 
South of the Lvcajfoa ; Mad6ir-barb W. Madeira Isles, West of 
Barbary ; AmNEmoab^ the Ammonites resided on the North-East 
of Moab. S. preceding a word signifies Saint. 

The letters G.S. denote Sacred Geography. 

A small capital at the end of a word denotes a particular portion 
or diylsion of the region designed by the preceding letters ; as 
Mqui'lats points out that the ^qui dwelt in Latium Novum ; 
Batch-tartap, that Batchiserai is situated on the peninsula of Little 
Tartary. 

Italics joined with a hyphen denote the latitude and longitude of 
a place : as, Agr^iir-otY, the latitude of Agra28 deg. the longitude 73. 

Italics joined with a comma denote the proportion of the king- 
dom, &c. to Great Britain ; as Germ^,«t, Germany to Great Britain 
as S*5S to 1. 

Italics joined without a hyphen generally denote the distance 
from London or Jerusalem ; as PardeZ se, Paris from London about 
285 miles ; Antiocht^, Antioch from Jerusalem about dOO miles. 

Syllables joined with this mark s: denote correspondent places 
of ancient and present geography: as, i4eA=livad, the ancient 
Aekaia^ the present Livadia. 



VOCES GEOGRAPHICiE. 



PAGE 

Abdir-thra 76, 77 

Aeerr-eamo 76, 77 

Aeh=dlY9d 78,79 

Aerdc-epir 76, 77 

Act-acam ifr. 

Adrdm-mysi 76, 77 

^giB=Sirch* 79, 81 

^gin=eng 80, 81 

-^o==Upari ib. 

JSqui'lats 77 

jEtHa=gib 80,81 

il/Hca=trip-tun 78, 79 

Aginc-art 69, 60 

Agr^k'OU 63, 6i 

Agr-ind 60,61 

Aix-la-cha-west 58, 60 

Aix-prov 67 

Aladul-nat 61 

^^6=brit 79 

A\epU-tei 63,64 

A16p-3yri 61 

MexUhif ^t 64 

AU6b=sfiY 78,79 

Amas-nat 61 

(Amboyn-mol) 67, 68 

Ambr-aeam 76, 77 

Amien-pica 67 

AmNEmoab G.S 85 

Amyc'tac 76, 77 

AncyT'gal ib. 

Ancon-pap 60 

Ang-cnern W. 69, 70 

Anj-orl 60 



Ant-brab 57 1 (Baha-Iuc) 



PAOB 

(Antig-lee) 69 

AntilMacS. ib. 

Aotioch^ 65 

Antidek-pisid 76,77 

Ant-voU ib» 

AquHei-eam ib, 

Aram=9yr'mes G. S 89 

Arb^l-au 75,77 

Arch-dwin 68, 60 

ArehM6'fe 63, 64 

Ard-rut 76,77 

Argent=stnsh 81 

AriminHttmb 76,77 

/4rm-tarc-alad 79 

Arv=hamaW. G.S 83,84 

Athke-pkrO.S 8?, 63 

Asthurtus O.S 82 

Ass6m-para 61 

Astr&c-tart ib. 

Aatrdp-lau 63, 64 

Alhik-el ib. 

Athos-mac 75, 77 

Aug-suab 57, 58 

Avig-proY 59, 60 

Ans-latv 77,78 

AzoY'circ 61 

Az6r-portW 68 

Rabym-/o Pa 63, 64 

Babyloifc^G.S 65 

Bad-suab 58, 61 

B^«=gu&dal 80,81 

Kag-diarb 61 

69 



* The reader vill find in this Index also, many of the ¥rords 
more fully expressed than they are in the body of the work. 



210 



VOCES OBOGRAPHlOiB. 



Bai-campa 76, 77 

Bale:==ma-iiii 80,81 

Balt-mary 61 

(Barb-carib) 60 

Burb&n-la 63,64 

Bar-catal 58 

Bksi\foUp 62,64 

Bast-conic 50, 60 

Batch-tartap i5. 

BeWbd-ku 63,64 

Belg-senri 58 

BeneTen-nap 39. 60 

Bengdd-iml 63, 64 

B6rge-nor 59, 60 

Berl-branden i5. 

Bermta-Um 63, 64 

Berm-carol E 69 

Berr-orl 60 

Berty-/ 62, 64 

Bir^'phcpH 75, 77 

Bes&nc-FranCom 50, 60 

Bilb-bisc 58 

B16Dbe-baF ix.58,60 

(Born-sound) 67, 68 

Boryst=meip 80, 81 

Bo»ph'e(mm=ntiff 79, 81 

Boqih4kraei=^const ib. 

Bourd-gui 57 

Brand-Saxu 59, 60 

Bred-brab ib, 

Brem-saxL 58, 60 

Bres-sile 59, 60 

Brug-fland 57 

Brund-cala 76,77 

Bras-braba 57 

Bras/y-o 62, 64 

Brut-oenot 77 

Barg-cast Vet 58 

Gad-andal 50,60 

Gagli-sard ib. 

Ctiirdou-U 63,64« 

Cair-eg 61 

Cala-meu 77, 78 

Cali-granN W 68,69 

Cal-pica 58,60 

Calp=g\b 81 

Cainb-hainau 57 

Cana-ioTM 83, 84 

Can4r-bild W 68 

Cand-arcbip S 67 



CoMnirpeueet • .15^ 77 

CarUa=bisc 79 

CanT-ess E 60,70 

Gapitanap 60 

Caram&n-nat 61 

Carbdli-pamjdi, 76, 77 

Carfbb-antE. 69 

Carls-cro 58 

Carp=scarp 80, 81 

Cartht£-fry 63, 64 

Cart-mur 50, 60 

Ca«p=s&la-back 79, 81 

(kutU=sci\\ 80,81 

Cass-rhinu 58, 60 

(Celeb-mol) 67, 68 

Ce n chr-ach 76, 77 

(Ceram-mol) 67, 68 

Cerig-mor S 67 

Cerf»=niadag 80, 81 

Gepha=nior W 67 

Ceyl'FwestE 67,68 

ChaU-iBtM 76,77 

ChaleM-bitk ib. 

Chale=neg 80, 81 

Chaly-gal 76,77 

Ghamb-saY 59, 60 

Chamb-tart 60,61 

Gbarl-nam 57 

Ghax-8BtbiNF 61 

Ckiron-bceo 75, 77 

Choczi-mold 58 

Christ-agg 59, 60 

(S. Christ-lee S.) 60 

C«m5=jutl 78,79 

Ctmm=caflr. 79, 81 

Cirt^um 76, 77 

CUh'bas 75,77 

Gitadel-min 69, 60 

Cley-westpha 57, 58 

Clus-etru 76, 77 

Cnid-dorA ib. 

Coddn=zett\ 78 , 79 

Col'Jgrip=co\ 81 

Col'All=gen ib. 

Colch= m'lng 78, 79 

('olog-rhinL 67, 58 

ColdsM-phrygi 76, 77 

Comagen-syrp ib* 

Compost-gal 58 

Consto5-^a 62, 64 

Const-rom 58 



VOCES OBOGEAPHIC^. 



2U 



Constat^ 65 

Const-suab 58, 60 

Co\iln'be 62, 64 

Co|i«a3 65 

Cop-zeal 60, 60 

Cord-aDdala ib. 

Coif-butW 67 

Carfmi'pelig Pa 76, 77 

Cortni-aeh ib. 

Corsic-gen S 67 

Co»=lang 80,81 

Craco-polp 50, 60 

Crac4z-e2 68, 64 

Crem.mil 50, 60 

Cress^pic ib. 

Cre(=caDdy 80, 81 

(Cub-ant) 60 

Cum-woli & Cur-tab 76, 77 

Cush==4ethiop O. S 83, 84 

Cyp'DatoS 67,68 

Cyrii=cor8ic 80,81 

CytA=ceri ib. 

Cyzi=m^s 76, 77 

D&a-bild 61 

Daci=mo\d'VrtL'i 78, 79 

Dam&8c5«zG.S 65 

Damaie-eea 8 76, 77 

Dan-a-bterdoz 6. S 65 

Dang-nab 61 

Dan-suab^eux 85, 86 

'DtLUtzickyz 65 

Dantzic-pol 50, 60 

'DAnXzvf-bei ^ 62,64 

Daufirapu 77 

DeUpho 75,77 

D^nmodyon 66 

Dev^nt-over 57 

Diarb-TorkA 61 

Dio8c&r=ZoQ 80, 81 

Dij6n-burg 57 

Dodan-mol 76, 77 

Douay-fland 57 

Dresd-sax 50,60 

Dunk-fland 57 

D win-Rug-whi Pa 86 

DynMnae 75,77 

Ebr-med-8 86 

Ebiid=We8% Scot 60, 70 

^W«=Y¥ 80,81 



Edin-mes 76,77 

Ed&m-^udG.^ 85 

Bia=sut'p€rs G. S 89 

Elb-ger-oc 86 

Eleug-meg 76, 77 

BtUh'tiTeh G.S 68 

Eph-imi 76,77 

^'=chim 78,70 

Bpidaulac 76. 7 7 

Erid=po 80,81 

Eub=neg ib. 

Eoph-arm-sin-pers 86 

ib'vx=black 70,81 

S.F^-gran 61 

(Per-can) 68 

Vfirrek-ak 63,64 

Ferrep,op-ap,t7 64 

Fez-barb 61 

Flor-tusc 50, 60 

Fontara-bisc 58,60 

Formc^t-p 63,64 

Form6.8ouchiD £.. 67, 68 

Fort=caii 80, 81 

Frana,p 65,66 

FraDC-rhinu 57, 58 

FranCom-burg E 59 

Fon-jut E 66, 67 

Gckf=cad 80,81 

Gadi'fret^gih 70, 81 

G«ft»/=bild 78,70 

Gang'paj^ 76, 77 

G&ngl-beng 86 

Garam=zaar 70 

Genevosy 65 

GeneT-switz 50,60 

8. Q%obi'Sou 63, 64 

Germ^e 65, 66 

Gibto«-« ; 62,64 

Qibrabsy 65 

(Gilo-mol) 67,68 

Gomer=a^ G. S 82,83 

Gor^=verd 80 

Gott-goth 59,60 

Grani-pk 75, 77 

Gren-dau 57 

Guem-norm W .60, 70 

Halicdr-dora 75, 77 

Hamdth=pkcBn'tfr G,S. 83,84 



212 



VOCES GEOGRAPHICifi. 



Harab-saxL 57, 58 

Hano-saxL ib. 

Hav-araD B8,84 

Ha?red-norm 59, 60 

Havi^^MuS'Car G. S 83 

Heid-rhiL 57,58 

Hec«/.ae 6S, 64 

8.Hel6tt-p ib. 

H.HeUcoDgoW 68 

HeUeo-ph 75,77 

Heliesp =dard 60, 8 1 

Herm-transyl ,.... 58 

Hmm-lahf 77,78 

Hesp==\erA 80,81 

Helv=switz 78,79 

Hip-numid 77,78 

(Hispanidl-ant) 69 

Hocst-bav 58, 60 

Holy-north E. Pa 69, 70 

HoUt-saxL 60 

Hymelt-att 75,77 

Hyrc=aala-back 79 

S.Jag-chili 61 

(Jamaic-ant) 69 

JVimdk'ky 68, 64 

Jam-virgin 61 

Tap-norChin £ 67,68 

Japto-6ay 63, 64 

JaV'-gret G. S 83 

(J av-80und) 67, 68 

J5=spain 79 

Jber -alb—eeoTg 78, 79 

Ice -nor W 66, 67 

Jers-norm W. .69, 70 

Jeruta-U ix. 63, 64 

Uil-doi 63,64 

lUi'phryM 76,77 

lUib-hispB ib, 

IMyW=cr6-dal 78, 79 

Jord-neph-italt G. S 86 

Ish-mad-am-drab G. S 85 

Isp-pers 60,61 

lipte-on 63, 64 

l88-cUi 75,77 

J«t=danu 80,81 

Ist-Ten 69, 60 

Ita5,an 65, 66 

ltha=comp 80,81 

Kitt=:itA G. S..^ 83 



Lad-phil E 67,68 

Laod'car 76, 77 

Lavini-UU 76, 77 

Leg-tusc 50, 60 

Leip-sax ib 

Leipsu5-ad 63, 64 

Lemn=stali 80, 81 

Lef5=metelin ib. 

Leuc4f€Bo 76, 77 

Leue=mAur 80, 81 

r^uw&rd-fries 57 

Li&-(fe»=zaara 79 

Libur=cro » .78, 79 

Libum-etru 76, 77 

Lt5y=barc 79 

Liege- westph 59, 60 

Lt^=gen 79 

Liffti8-mar=gen 80, 81 

Limo-guienn 60 

Listei-bz 63, 64 

Lfs-port 50, 60 

L6nlaib 64 

Loo-gaeld 57 

Lorett-anc 59, 60 

Lorr-champ E 52 

Lub^liby G. S 83, 84 

(Luc&yo-luc) .... 69 

Lac-flor E ib. 

Lue-oenot 77 

Lud=lyd G. S 82 

L«^B=leyd 81 

Lug=\yo t6. 

Lund-scon 59, 61 

Lyca-cap 76, 77 

Mac&ss-mol 67 

Madag-zang E 68 

Mad-castN 58 

Madeir-barbW 68 

Mad6irtt-cd 63, 64 

Madroy-f ix. 62, 64 

Madreiffz 64, 65 

Meeanrlydi 75, 77 

M<Bot-2iZ 79, 81 

Maest-limbur 59, 60 

Magd-saxL 58, 60 

Maff'ScythQ.S 83 

Mala-gran 59,60 

Maldiv-Pwest S 67, 68 

Malt-sici S 68 

(Manil-phil) 67, 68 



VOCES GEOGRAPHICiB. 



218 



.»■ 



.0 

i 

,1 

I 






Man-lanc W 69,70 

Mawt-ure 76, 77 

MaraihraU 75, 77 

Marseil-proY 67 

Jlfa«=fez-mor 78, 79 

Meaux-champ 59,60 

Mediol'ins 76,77 

Memph'JEgi ib, 

3feniifA=madag 80 

M€8hech=niosch G. S 83 

Me8op=dmr 79 

Messap-greeu 77 

Messinik'bau 63, 64 

Metelin-nat W 67,68 

Midd-zeal 57 

Mi-majorc-yalen E 66, 67 

(Mind-phil) 67,68 

Ming-georg 61 

Mitt-courl 59. 60 

Mizr-eegG.S 83,84 

MoarN£edG,S 86 

Ma}84fnf=hu\g 78, 79 

McBS'8up=serv , . . . ^ ib. 

Mog=mentz 81 

Mol6c-PEast £ 67, 68 

Monom-sths 61 

MoDS-hain 57 

Montpel-lang 58, 60 

Moscassy 65 

Mosdu-t^ 62, 64 

MousAl-diar 61 

Monlc-bavar 57, 58 

Munst-west ib. 

MwH-boi 77,78 

Mycin-arg 76, 77 

Nabath-arav 77, 78 

Naq/W-* ...63,64 

Nancy-lor 59,60 

Naplo5-5i« 63,64 

Nass-rhinu 59, 60 

Natol-turkA 61 

NazarJE:^ G.S 65 

Neg-Uyad E 67 

NemC'arg 76, 77 

Neoetes^ap ib, 

Newf-noYscot E 68, 69 

Nico-cyp 61 

NieP-eux 85,86 

NUdm-bUhy 75,77 

ififfBaaeg 79 



Nil-medi 86 

Nim-gaelder 58, 60 

Ninto-/c 63,64 

Nism-langaed 59, 60 

Nol-eampa 77, 78 

Nom-arai} ib. 

Nor=ba,\tir'9,ua . - 78, 79 

Numid=a\g 79 

Nic9»t-nov=bild ib, 

Nurem-franc 57, 58 

NysS'tneg .75, 71 

Od-balt 8d 

Oeno-greeu 77 

Oliv-prus 58, 6« 

Olym-elis, 76, 77 

Olymp'thess ib, 

Omer-art 58, 60 

Oph=ehersG,S 89 

Oran-proT 57 

Ork-scot N 69, 70 

Oss-thess 75, 77 

Ovi-ast 58 

Oxld-fsfi-ap 64 

Pad=po 80, 81 

Pada-yen 58,60 

Palerm-sici .59, 60 

Palm^cBlS '. 77,78 

Pampel-nay - 58 

Pann6n=hutig 78, 79 

Parfke 62,64 

Par-isle 57 

Parde/ 64, 65 

Pata4ye 76,77 

Pavdt-venet ib, 

Patm=palm 80, 8 1 

Pat'gporad 75, 77 

Pek-chin 60,61 

Pekinoz-5ap 63, 64 

Peli6iirthes8 77 

PeU-amath 76,77 

Pelopon=mor 78, 79 

Perg-myn 76, 77 

Perpig-rous 59, 60 

Petwara-sclay ib, 

PeucH-apu 77 

PhaT'cdixand 68 

PharS'thessa 76, 77 

Philadelp-lyd ib, 

Philad'pens 61 



214 



VOGBS GEOGRAPHIC^. 



PhUip^raei 76,77 

Philip-EasiP^n E 67, t)8 

PM2ue=pai G. S 83, 84 

PkuUib G.S ib, 

Pitid-pamG 76, 77 

Poict-orl 57 

PoMstri 69,60 

PoU,tii 66, 65 

Pomeran-saxo 69, 60 

Port-noYscot 61 

Por,t» 66 

(Portric-ant) 60 

(Port-sant-mad) 68 

Poseg-sclav 69,60 

Pngaulz •••. 66 

Prag-boh 69,60 

Prag/y-6o 62, 64 

Presb-hungu 69, 60 

Propont=mar 79, 81 

(Pro^i-luc) 69 

Pyl-mets 75,77 

Quebop-^ 63, 64 

Queb-canada 61 

/?a-d^d=pers-ga G.S 83, 84 

Ragu-dal 69, 60 

RamKl&vi-peiii W 69, 70 

Rati-bav / 59,60 

R<iv€n'Umb 77, 78 

Rav-rom 59, 60 

R^nn-br^ta 57 

jRAa««=gris-ty r-it 78, 79 

i2fta=volga 80 

Bhig-calabri 76, 77 

Khei-cham 57 

Rhin-gris-ger-oc ; . .85, 86 

Rhod-nato S 67, 68 

Rhon-med-s. ... * 86 

Rhotot-to 63, 64 

Ric^2-^t4 ib, 

Riga-liv 59,60 

Roch-orl ib, 

Rois^d-be 62, 64- 

R6ii{/*a,to-&^,<2ott 64 

Komouly 65 

Rom-pap •60 

i{otAo=rouen 81 

Rou-norm 57 

Rous-cataloa 59, 60 

B«6t=fium 80, 81 



Ru88a3,5t 

Sab-arav 77, 78 

Sagufi'tarr 76, 77 

Sagunt=morYed 8i 

Salam=co\ 80, 8 1 

Salamanc-leo 59, 60 

ScUent-megs 77, 78 

8alonic-ma« 68 

S. SaW-braz 61 

Samarof G. S 65 

SamdtO'^ofn 75, 77 

Sam-nat W 67, 68 

Saracin'ttrav. 77, 78 

Sard-genS 67 

Sarag-arr 56 

Sard-lyd 75,77 

Sardicthrad t6. 

Sarm=po-ta-ru88-l 78, 79 

Sav-burg-dau E 52 

Saxo-saxu 59 60 

>cand=s we- nor 78, 79 

Scen-araD 77, 78 

Scio-nat W 67, 68 

Sclav-hang 59, 60 

Scifth'hOsi=t2iTt 78, 79 

Sen-atlant-oc 86 

Serai-bosn & Sev-andalu. . . 58 

Skeb-araw G. S 83, 84 

Shep-kentE 69,70 

Shet-scot N ib, 

Hmmqf-ga 68, 64 

Sici-nap S 67 

SicU'jTet=mess 80, P I 

Sid-^hcen 77, 78 

Si«-odrtot=ven, -am6=lart, 

-ara6=redS, -cort«<A=lep, 

gan = beng, -mag = sia, 

-per«=bals & Sin'8aUim=s 

eng 80,81 

Simi'pann 76, 77 

Sles-j ut 59, 60 

Smyrnik'dou 62, 64 

Smym-ion 76, 77 

Smyrn-nat 61 

So^d=zagat-usb 79 

Soiss-isle 59,60 

iSoph-bulg 68 

Sound-PEast S. E 67, 68 

SpaM 65,66 

Spal-dalma 58